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Our Daily Bread

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  • Very Rev. Kuriakose Corepiscopa Moolayil
    READ: Isaiah 41:17-20 I will plant in the wilderness the cedar and the acacia tree, the myrtle and the oil tree. —Isaiah 41:19 Near one of the most majestic
    Message 1 of 90 , Aug 15, 2011
      READ: Isaiah 41:17-20

      I will plant in the wilderness the cedar and the acacia tree, the myrtle and the oil tree. —Isaiah 41:19

      Near one of the most majestic sites in God’s nature is a botanical garden of awe-inspiring beauty. On the Canadian side of Niagara Falls is the
      Floral Showhouse. Inside the greenhouse is a vast array of beautiful
      flowers and exotic plants. In addition to the flora my wife and I
      observed, something else caught our attention—the wording of a plaque.
      It reads: “Enter, friends, and view God’s pleasant handiwork, the
      embroidery of earth.” What a marvelous way to describe the way our
      Creator favored this globe with such jaw-dropping beauty!
      The
      “embroidery of earth” includes such far-ranging God-touches as the verdant
      rainforests of Brazil, the frigid beauty of Arctic Circle glaciers, the
      flowing wheat fields of the North American plains, and the sweeping
      reaches of the fertile Serengeti in Africa. These areas, like those
      described in Isaiah 41, remind us to praise God for His creative
      handiwork.
      Scripture also reminds us that the wonder of individual plants are part of God’s
      work. From the rose (Isa. 35:1) to the lily (Matt. 6:28) to the myrtle,
      cypress, and pine (Isa. 41:19-20), God colors our world with a
      splendorous display of beauty. Enjoy the wonder. And spend some time
      praising God for the “embroidery of earth.” —Dave Branon
      If God’s creation helps you see
      What wonders He can do
      Then trust the many promises
      That He has given you. —D. De Haan
      Creation is filled with signs that point to the Creator.
    • Very rev. Kuriakose Corepiscopa Moolayil
      READ: Psalm 22:1-8,19-26 Those who seek Him will praise the Lord. Let your heart live forever! —Psalm 22:26 Do you know which psalm is quoted most often in
      Message 90 of 90 , Nov 1, 2012
        READ: Psalm 22:1-8,19-26

        Those who seek Him will praise the Lord. Let your heart live forever! —Psalm 22:26

        Do you know which psalm is quoted most often in the New Testament? You may have guessed the familiar and beloved 23rd Psalm, but actually it is
        Psalm 22. This psalm begins with David’s poignant, heart-breaking words
        that were quoted by Jesus on the cross, “My God, My God, why have You
        forsaken Me?” (Matt. 27:46; Mark 15:34).
        Imagine the situation David must have found himself in that caused him to cry
        out to God in this way. Notice that he felt forsaken and abandoned: “Why are You so far from helping me?” (Ps. 22:1). He also felt ignored: “O
        my God, I cry in the daytime, but You do not hear” (v.2).
        Ever been there? Have you ever looked up into the heavens and wondered why
        it seemed that God had abandoned you, or was ignoring you? Welcome to
        David’s world. But for every plaintive cry David expresses, there is a
        characteristic of God mentioned that rescues him from despondency.
        Through it all, David discovers that God is holy (v.3), trustworthy
        (vv.4-5), a deliverer and rescuer (vv.8,20-21), and his strength (v.19).
        Do you feel forsaken? Seek the Lord. Rehearse His character. And “let your heart rejoice with everlasting joy” (v.26 nlt). —Dave Branon
        Lord, sometimes I feel as if You don’t care about
        my life. When those times come, please remind me
        of Your character as You did David. Help me to
        lean on You again and know that You are there.
        Even when we don’t sense God’s presence, His loving care is all around us.
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