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Our Daily Bread: Forwarded

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  • Very Rev. Kuriakose Corepiscopa Moolayil
    READ: 1 Samuel 1:1-18 Appended I cried to the Lord with my voice, and He heard me from His holy hill. —Psalm 3:4 Few things disable new workers on a job
    Message 1 of 153 , Jan 3, 2011
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      READ: 1 Samuel 1:1-18 Appended

      I cried to the Lord with my voice, and He heard me from His holy hill. —Psalm
      3:4

      Few things disable new workers on a job like criticism from veterans. Good
      hiring managers know to protect new employees by surrounding them with mentors
      willing to shield them from unnecessary barbs.

      Hannah is a mentor to us in dealing with criticism and deep desires of the
      heart (1 Sam. 1:1-18). Surrounded by a husband who didn’t understand, a
      taunting peer, and an overly judgmental clergyman, Hannah found a way through
      the fog by confiding in God (v.10). While we now know God answered the prayer
      of Hannah’s heart by giving her a child, we don’t know for sure if Eli’s
      blessing was a wish or a promise from God (v.17). I think her no-longer-sad
      face came most of all because she gained peace from confiding in Him.

      We were created to be in relationship with God; and when we take that
      relationship to an intimate level, it bonds us not only to His presence but
      also to His strength. Prayers that express our hurts and emotions are most
      assuredly welcomed by God because they demonstrate our trust in Him. We will
      often find perspective, and nearly always come away comforted, knowing we’ve
      entrusted the things that are troubling us—whether criticism or deep desires—to
      the One who is best able to sort through them. —Randy Kilgore

      The kindest Friend I’ve ever had
      Is One I cannot see,
      Yet One in whom I can confide,
      Who loves and blesses me. —Shuler

      In prayer, it’s better to have a heart without words than words without heart.
      1 Samuel 1
      The Birth of Samuel 1 There was a certain man from Ramathaim, a Zuphite[a] from
      the hill country of Ephraim, whose name was Elkanah son of Jeroham, the son of
      Elihu, the son of Tohu, the son of Zuph, an Ephraimite. 2 He had two wives; one
      was called Hannah and the other Peninnah. Peninnah had children, but Hannah had
      none.

      3 Year after year this man went up from his town to worship and sacrifice to
      the LORD Almighty at Shiloh, where Hophni and Phinehas, the two sons of Eli,
      were priests of the LORD. 4 Whenever the day came for Elkanah to sacrifice, he
      would give portions of the meat to his wife Peninnah and to all her sons and
      daughters. 5 But to Hannah he gave a double portion because he loved her, and
      the LORD had closed her womb. 6 Because the LORD had closed Hannah’s womb, her
      rival kept provoking her in order to irritate her. 7 This went on year after
      year. Whenever Hannah went up to the house of the LORD, her rival provoked her
      till she wept and would not eat. 8 Her husband Elkanah would say to her,
      “Hannah, why are you weeping? Why don’t you eat? Why are you downhearted? Don’t
      I mean more to you than ten sons?”

      9 Once when they had finished eating and drinking in Shiloh, Hannah stood up.
      Now Eli the priest was sitting on his chair by the doorpost of the LORD’s
      house. 10 In her deep anguish Hannah prayed to the LORD, weeping bitterly. 11
      And she made a vow, saying, “LORD Almighty, if you will only look on your
      servant’s misery and remember me, and not forget your servant but give her a
      son, then I will give him to the LORD for all the days of his life, and no
      razor will ever be used on his head.”

      12 As she kept on praying to the LORD, Eli observed her mouth. 13 Hannah was
      praying in her heart, and her lips were moving but her voice was not heard. Eli
      thought she was drunk 14 and said to her, “How long are you going to stay drunk?
      Put away your wine.”

      15 “Not so, my lord,” Hannah replied, “I am a woman who is deeply troubled. I
      have not been drinking wine or beer; I was pouring out my soul to the LORD. 16
      Do not take your servant for a wicked woman; I have been praying here out of my
      great anguish and grief.”

      17 Eli answered, “Go in peace, and may the God of Israel grant you what you
      have asked of him.”

      18 She said, “May your servant find favor in your eyes.” Then she went her way
      and ate something, and her face was no longer downcast.

      Footnotes:
      1. 1 Samuel 1:1 See Septuagint and 1 Chron. 6:26-27,33-35; or from Ramathaim
      Zuphim.
    • Very Rev. Kuriakose Corepiscopa Moolayil
      READ: Psalm 31:9-15 Have mercy on me, O Lord, for I am in trouble; my eye wastes away with grief, yes, my soul and my body! —Psalm 31:9 Today marks the 10th
      Message 153 of 153 , Sep 11, 2011
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        READ: Psalm 31:9-15

        Have mercy on me, O Lord, for I am in trouble; my eye wastes away with grief, yes, my soul and my body! —Psalm 31:9
        Today marks the 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks in the US on
        September 11, 2001. It’s hard to think about that date without mental
        images of the destruction, grief, and loss that swept over America and
        the world following those tragic events. The loss of thousands of lives
        was compounded by the depth of loss felt corporately—a lost sense of
        security as a country. The sorrow of loss, personal and corporate, will
        always accompany the memory of the events of that day.
        Those horrific events are not the only painful memories of September 11. It
        also marks the anniversary of my father-in-law’s death. Jim’s loss is
        felt deeply within our family and
        his circle of friends.
        No matter what kind of sorrow we experience, there is only one real
        comfort—the mercy of God. David, in his own heartache, cried to his
        heavenly Father, “Have mercy on me, O Lord, for I am in trouble; my eye wastes away with grief, yes, my soul and my body!” (Ps. 31:9). Only in the mercy of God can we find comfort for our pain and peace for our troubled hearts.
        In all losses, we can turn to the true Shepherd, Jesus Christ, who alone can heal our brokenness and grief. —Bill Crowder
        We have a Friend
        who’ll never leave,
        Who’s closer than a brother;
        He’s there to meet our deepest needs,
        To comfort like no other. —Sper
        When God permits suffering, He also provides comfort.
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