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SERMON OF THE WEEK

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  • Rev. Dr. V Kurian Thomas Valiyaparambi
    October 10, 2010 Next Sunday is the 4th Sunday after Sleebo. Gospel reading for Sunday is from Luke 16:1-15. Theme: No servant can serve two masters. Either
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 5, 2010
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      October 10, 2010

      Next Sunday is the 4th Sunday after Sleebo. Gospel reading for Sunday is from Luke 16:1-15.

      Theme: "No servant can serve two masters. Either he will hate one and love the other or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and mammon (money)." Luke 16:13)

      Gospel Reading: (Luke 16:1-15) "

      The Parable of the Shrewd Manager

      1 Jesus told his disciples: "There was a rich man whose manager was accused of wasting his possessions. 2So he called him in and asked him, 'What is this I hear about you? Give an account of your management, because you cannot be manager any longer.'

      3"The manager said to himself, 'What shall I do now? My master is taking away my job. I'm not strong enough to dig, and I'm ashamed to beg 4I know what I'll do so that, when I lose my job here, people will welcome me into their houses.'

      5"So he called in each one of his master's debtors. He asked the first, 'How much do you owe my master?'

      6" 'Eight hundred gallonsa] of olive oil,' he replied.
      "The manager told him, 'Take your bill, sit down quickly, and make it four hundred.'

      7"Then he asked the second, 'And how much do you owe?'
      " 'A thousand bushelsb] of wheat,' he replied.
      "He told him, 'Take your bill and make it eight hundred.'

      8"The master commended the dishonest manager because he had acted shrewdly. For the people of this world are more shrewd in dealing with their own kind than are the people of the light. 9I tell you, use worldly wealth to gain friends for yourselves, so that when it is gone, you will be welcomed into eternal dwellings.

      10"Whoever can be trusted with very little can also be trusted with much, and whoever is dishonest with very little will also be dishonest with much. 11So if you have not been trustworthy in handling worldly wealth, who will trust you with true riches? 12And if you have not been trustworthy with someone else's property, who will give you property of your own?

      13"No servant can serve two masters. Either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and Money."

      14The Pharisees, who loved money, heard all this and were sneering at Jesus. 15He said to them, "You are the ones who justify yourselves in the eyes of men, but God knows your hearts. What is highly valued among men is detestable in God's sight."

      Rich man and the shrewd manager

      Message:

      In the gospel, Jesus relates a parable to the disciples in reference to our attitude towards wealth. Jesus talks about our possessions, how we are to deal with what God has given us as a gift.

      The parable is about a foolish steward, or manager. The master, or the owner, had entrusted the manager with all his wealth to be properly looked after. However, the manager misused the goods. When the master came back and realized that the manager had misused his wealth, he dismissed the manager and gave the manager time to settle the accounts. The moment this manager realized it did cost him the job, he makes an assessment of what he did. The manager said to himself, "What shall I do now?. The owner is taking away my job." He realized he is in trouble. The moment this manager realized that he is going to lose his job, he makes an assessment of where he stood. The manger said to himself, "What shall I do now My Master is taking away my job." He realized he is in trouble.

      When the master came back, he dismissed the manager, and gave him time to settle the accounts. The manager begins to cut down on what he overcharged the owner and customers. The master afterwards praises the manager for realizing his problems and taking immediate actions to fix it. The Lord said this man should be commended because he began to use his opportunity wisely.

      There are three things noticeable in this parable:

      1). Accountability. When the master came back, the unwise manager was brought to accountability for his actions. The Master owned the wealth. The manager only managed it. The Master had expectations and this explains why the manager was accountable to the owner.

      2) Assessment of the manager. The moment the unwise manager found out he was going to lose his job, he made an assessment of where he stood. The manager said to himself, "What shall I do now? My master is taking away my job. I am not strong to do any manual labor, and I am ashamed to beg.' He realizes he is in trouble. The master came home and found the manager was not doing what the owner required of him.

      3)The actions of the manager. The manager sat down with his account books, began to correct the accounts.

      There are three lessons we can learn from this parable.

      1) First: We are to use the opportunity wisely. The master praised the manager for the fact that he realized there was a problem. He immediately took action to fix it. Likewise, use the opportunity that God has given us wisely. God gives us a chance just like the owner gave the manager, a chance to correct our lifestyle. There is an old saying, like this, "Though I can't go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now on and make a brand new ending." And that is what happened to the manager. The Lord said the man shall be commended because he used his opportunity wisely.

      2) Second: Trust is something to be earned. Trust cannot be given or granted freely. It must be earned. If we can't be faithful with little things, how can we be with large things?. If we misuse whatever was given to us, the master won't give us any more. God doesn't trust us on what we plan to do or hope to do, instead we will be measured on by what we are doing right now.

      3) Third: Be totally devoted to God. No servant can serve two masters. Either he will hate the one and love the other or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You can't serve both God and mammon (wealth).

      Let's be faithful to God for all his blessings.

      Prepared by: Rev. Dr. V Kurian Thomas Valiyaparambi
    • Rev. Dr. V Kurian Thomas
      SERMON OF THE WEEK September 4, 2011 Next Sunday is the 3rd Sunday after Assumption. Subject: The Temple Tax Issue Gospel Reading: Mathew 17:24-27. 24After
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 30, 2011
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        SERMON OF THE WEEK
        September 4, 2011

        Next Sunday is the 3rd Sunday after Assumption.

        Subject: The Temple Tax Issue
        Gospel Reading: Mathew 17:24-27.

        "24After Jesus and his disciples arrived in Capernaum, the collectors of the two-dragma tax came to Peter and asked, "Doesn't your teacher pay the temple tax?". 25"Yes, he does," he replied. When Peter came into the house, Jesus was the first to speak. "What do you think, Simon?" he asked. "From whom do the kings of the earth collect duty
        and taxes�from their own sons or from others?" 26"From others," Peter answered. "Then the sons are exempt," Jesus said to him. 27"But so that we may not offend them, go to the lake and throw out your line. Take the first fish you catch; open its mouth and you will find a four-drachma coin. Take it and give it to them for my tax and yours."

        Message:
        Jesus and his disciples were in Capernaum, Peter's home town. There the tax collectors came to Peter. They then asked Peter, "Doesn't your teacher pay the tax?". This was the tax collected for the upkeep
        of the Jerusalem temple. The money was used to support all the temple services.

        This question from the tax collectors was probably a test to see how supportive was Jesus to the Temple services. Peter answered, "Yes." When he and Jesus were in the house away from the tax collectors, Jesus asked Peter, "What do you think, Simon? From whom do the kings of earth collect taxes, from their sons or from strangers?" There are kings on earth who run their kingdoms with money raised from taxes. Their taxes are collected not from the king's children, but from the rest of the citizens. The analogy pictures God as the king and the temple services as the running of the kingdom. This makes a comparison between king's sons and strangers.

        Peter answers, "From strangers." That is, kings collect taxes from citizens who are not part of the royal family. Jesus said to Peter, "That's right, then the sons are exempt from taxes." Jesus says to Peter, "So that we don't want to offend them, give it to them for you and me." Jesus is the Lord of the temple, therefore did not owe tax. Jesus took this opportunity to teach what ought to be practically the right thing to do to avoid embarrassments. Jesus said, "So that we do not offend them, go to the sea and throw a hook, and take the first fish that comes up. When you open its mouth, you will find a coin. Take that and give it to them for your sake and mine."

        In this example, Jesus shows us how to deal with a situation where we
        are conflicted with and don't know what to do. Regardless of what the right answer may be, do the thing that is necessary to avoid embarrassments. Sometimes the 'right' is less important than to maintain good relationships with others. It is not necessary to force our right on others when we know it will only damage our reputation or relationships in someone else's eyes.


        Prepared by:
        Rev. Dr. V Kurian Thomas, Valiyaparambil
      • Rev. Dr. V Kurian Thomas
        SERMON OF THE WEEK January 8, 2012 Next Sunday is the first Sunday after the baptism of our Lord (or Danaha -January 6th)). Gospel reading is from Mathew
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 3, 2012
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          SERMON OF THE WEEK
          January 8, 2012

          Next Sunday is the first Sunday after the baptism of our Lord (or "Danaha" -January 6th)). Gospel reading is from Mathew 4:12-22.
          Theme: "Follow me and I will make you fishers of men" - (Mathew4:18)

          Gospel:

          "Jesus Begins to Preach
          12 When Jesus heard that John had been put in prison, he withdrew to Galilee. 13 Leaving Nazareth, he went and lived in Capernaum, which was by the lake in the area of Zebulun and Naphtali 14 to fulfill what was said through the prophet Isaiah:
          15 Land of Zebulun and land of Naphtali,
          the Way of the Sea, beyond the Jordan,
          Galilee of the Gentiles
          16 the people living in darkness
          have seen a great light;
          on those living in the land of the shadow of death
          a light has dawned.[a]
          17 From that time on Jesus began to preach, Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near.
          Jesus Calls His First Disciples
          18 As Jesus was walking beside the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon called Peter and his brother Andrew. They were casting a net into the lake, for they were fishermen. 19 Come, follow me, Jesus said, and I will send you out to fish for people. 20 At once they left their nets and followed him.
          21 Going on from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John. They were in a boat with their father Zebedee, preparing their nets. Jesus called them, 22 and immediately they left the boat and their father and followed him." (Mathew 4:12-22)

          Message:
          The central core purpose of Christian life is outlined in these verses: Evangelize, Incorporate, and Disciple. Jesus says, go therefore and make disciples of all nations; evangelize with the strength of the gospel and teach the world about the kingdom of God; and follow me, I will make you fishers of men.
          As Jesus was walking by the sea of Galilee, he saw two brother casting a net into the sea. They were fisherman. Jesus said to the, "Follow me, and I Will make you fishers of men."
          In order to understand this command, we need to look at the following questions.

          (1) What does it mean to follow Jesus? Follow me is an invitation to the believer for services. The decision to follow Jesus is not a simple task. It is to set aside one's personal goals and pleasures in order to embrace the purposes for which God created us. The purpose is to know God in a personal way and make disciples by teaching them Christ's commandments. To follow Christ means to give up personal affections, goals and priorities.

          When Jesus called Peter and Andrew, their goal was to become successful fishermen. In asking them to forsake their goal, Jesus commanded them to follow him and would make them fishers of men's souls.

          (2) How does one become fishers of men? When Jesus told Peter to cast his nets on the other side of the boat, then Peter said "Master, we have fished all night and caught nothing." But when they used the very effective method of using the light of Jesus, fish were attracted to it.

          (3) How to fish for Christ? Jesus uses an effective method to draw people to himself. Apostle John quotes Jesus in 8:12, "I am the light of the world, he who follows me shall not walk in darkness but in the light of life."

          Just as the fish is attracted to the light of the disciples, God wants people to be attracted to his light shining through the disciples. The light of every believer is the presence of Jesus in their lives. Paul says in Corinthians 4:6-7, "For it is God who commanded light to shine out of darkness and who has shown in their hearts to give the lights of the glory of God."

          (4) What does it require to follow Jesus? It is a call that requires complete and immediate attachment to God. Peter and Andrew "left their nets." James and John left their father. The requirement for following Jesus are not the same for everyone. Basically it is the willingness to exchange their affections, goals and priorities in life.

          Peter was a disciple who actually left everything to follow Jesus. However, he failed Jesus by denying him on the night of Jesus' arrest. A few days later, Peter with some of his disciples decided to go for fishing. They got out to do the fishing but couldn't catch a single fish. Jesus calls them from the shore and ends up performing a miracle by filling their nets with fish. After they have enjoyed a fish breakfast together, Jesus comes up to Peter and asks, "Do you love me more than these fish, nets, and the bread?

          All of us can also imagine Jesus asking us the same question. Jesus may mention our family, all our assets, cash, position, career and all that. Do we love Jesus more than all our possessions?

          Jesus wants us to respond something like, "Yes, Lord. I love you more than all my possessions. And I want to prove it with my actions. I am prepared to follow you, for I am your disciple.

          Prepared by:
          Rev. Dr. V Kurian Thomas, Valiyaparambil
        • Rev. Dr. V. KurianThomas
          SERMON OF THE WEEK September 30, 2012   Next Sunday, September 30, is the third Sunday after Sleebo. Gospel reading is from Mark 2:23-28.   Theme:  Was
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 25, 2012
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            SERMON OF THE WEEK
            September 30, 2012
             
            Next Sunday, September 30, is the third Sunday after Sleebo. Gospel reading is from Mark 2:23-28.
             
            Theme: "Was Sabbath made for man or man made for Sabbath?"
                                       
            Message:  God's laws are not for control and domination. God did not give us his commands to show who is the boss. He gave us his laws for our benefit. Jesus makes that very clear in this gospel.

            The term "Sabbath" is derived from the Hebrew word "Shabbat", which means, "to cease". Those who observe Sabbath generally regard it as a day of rest and respect for God for having completed the creation in six days as well as to commemorate Jewish redemption from slavery in Egypt. The so-called "Sabbatical leave" is thought to have its origin mandated also from this concept. The Pharisees were very traditionalists in observing the Sabbath because of its roots in the Old Testament teachings. .

            One day as Jesus and his disciples were walking through a grain field on a Sabbath day, the disciples started to pluck some heads of grain to satisfy their hunger. The Pharisees happened to observe this and complained to Jesus about the actions of his disciples. It was assumed, as their teacher, Jesus was responsible for their behavior. The Pharisees viewed picking grain on a Sabbath day was a violation of the rule prescribed in Exodus 20: 8-11 which states, "Remember the Sabbath day by keeping it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the Sabbath day is a Sabbath to the Lord. On it you shall not do any work."

            Jesus responded by citing the example of King David from 1 Samuel 21:1-16, David who was fleeing from Saul took and ate the consecrated bread from the house of God. The consecrated bread was to be eaten only by the priest, yet David who was hungry and in need of food was allowed as an exception by the high-priest Abiathar. That was on a Sabbath day. In opting for David, the Pharisees thereby exonerated the activities of Jesus' disciples. Jesus cited David's action as a precedent. When David ate the consecrated bread, he was hungry and it would be admittedly a lawful act. Jesus said the disciples ate grain because they were hungry, something the law of God permits.     

            Jesus then continued to respond by discussing the purpose of Sabbath. Human beings were not created to observe the Sabbath, but Sabbath was created for their benefit. Sabbath is not an end in itself but only a means to achieve a goal. Sabbath was originally given to men for rest and recreation. When properly observed, it would be a joy. But the Pharisees had made it a terrible burden for people to bear. None of God's laws were intended to be interpreted to hurt people, rather it was to help them. Jesus addressed the charges by stating that the Sabbath was not meant to restrict necessities. It was made to serve people, not for the people to serve Sabbath.

            Sabbath has been essentially a Jewish practice, not a Christian way of life. It has been a Jewish practice to commemorate Jewish people's redemption from slavery in Egypt. It also commemorates God's creation of the universe, and on the seventh day God rested (or ceased) from his work. Sabbath is fasting one day a week. It is a weekly practice of "stilling" ourselves and taking rest, so that during rest we have a still soul and be able to remember what is important that God wants us to have in life. Treat it as a gift from God.
             
            Prepared by: Rev. Dr. V. Kurian Thomas Valiyaparambil
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