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Re:Correct Use - Rabban?

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  • Shinu Jesus Abraham
    Barekmore Thirumeni Thanks for the very detailed clarification and thanks to Bennet Shemmachen for the logical thoughts. Requesting prayers Shinu Jesus Abraham
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 6, 2007
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      Barekmore Thirumeni

      Thanks for the very detailed clarification and thanks to Bennet
      Shemmachen for the logical thoughts.

      Requesting prayers

      Shinu Jesus Abraham
      Member # 2908
    • Dr. Thomas Joseph
      I see that this question has received thoughtful responses from H.E. Mor Athanasius Geevargis and others. I would like to provide some additional context. The
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 6, 2007
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        I see that this question has received thoughtful responses from H.E.
        Mor Athanasius Geevargis and others. I would like to provide some
        additional context.

        The term Rabban precedes monasticism in the Syriac Church, which
        arrived from Egypt only in the late 4th cent. Bishop Jacob of
        Nisibis is know to have founded a school in Edessa in the early 4th
        cent. where the Head of the school was called Rabban and he also
        occupied the chief exegete's chair (kursyo da-mpassqono). The chief
        disciplinary official as well as the librarian was the Steward
        (rabbayto). The school had other academic positions such as maqryono
        (instructor in liturgical reading)m, mhaggyono (elementary reading
        master) and badoqo (researcher, apparently in secular subjects). The
        students were called eskolaye (from the Greek schola). Mor Ephrem
        the Syrian was a mpassqono (Exegete) at this school. (See Robert
        Murray, Symbols of Church and Kingdom, [1975, Gorgias reprint 2004,
        p. 23]).

        Rabban is very likely to have later been associated with the
        monastic schools and then generally applied to any monk. Today
        Rabban typically denotes an ordained priest-monk. Novitiates are
        called sharwoye and the general term for monks irrespective of their
        ecclesiastical rank is dayroyo (inhabitant of a dayro - monastery).

        Even though in Syriac, today we write Raban (reesh beth nun) with a
        single beth, we know that the beth was in early Syriac doubled, i.e.
        Rab-ban. Even though it is written with a single beth, it is
        pronounced with hard spirantization (qushoyo); otherwise a beth
        preceded by a vowel would be pronounced soft (rukhokho). (See George
        Kiraz, Introduction to Syriac Spirantization, Barhebraeaus Verlag,
        Holland, 1995).

        Curiously, where such doubling occurs, in Malayalam, the beth is
        corrupted as "mb". Ramban is an example. Another is qambel for
        qabbel (accept).

        PS: At the N. American Syriac Symposium at Princeton in 2003, a Syro-
        Malabar priest presented a choir that sang many East Syriac songs.
        He also had the songs recorded on a CD which was on sale. On
        noticing the mis-transliterated Syriac title of the CD (Qambel
        Moran), Prof John Healey (Manchester Univ, and author of the First
        Studies in Syriac, Gorgias Press, 2005) remarked to a few of us that
        even though the Indian Syriac music was good, due to philological
        reasons he could not buy the CD!)

        Rgds,
        Thomas Joseph, Ph.D.
        Web Master, Syriac Orthodox Resources [ http://sor.cua.edu/ ]
        Tech. Editor, Hugoye: Journal of Syriac Studies [
        http://bethmardutho.cua.edu/Hugoye/ ]
        ID: 0202


        --- In SOCM-FORUM@yahoogroups.com, Shinu Jesus Abraham wrote:
        >
        > Greetings to All
        >
        > What is the correct name - Rabban or Ramban in syriac language? If
        it is Rabban why do we follow is as Ramban?
        >
        > Shinu Jesus Abraham
        > Member ID # 2908
      • Shinu Jesus Abraham
        Respected Dr. Thomas Joseph That was really informative. Thanks Shinu Jesus Abraham Member ID # 2908 ... H.E.
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 7, 2007
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          Respected Dr. Thomas Joseph

          That was really informative.

          Thanks

          Shinu Jesus Abraham
          Member ID # 2908


          --- In SOCM-FORUM@yahoogroups.com, Dr. Thomas Joseph wrote:
          >
          > I see that this question has received thoughtful responses from
          H.E.
          > Mor Athanasius Geevargis and others. I would like to provide some
          > additional context.
          >
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