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  • When I examined given naming conventions several years ago, found that Slavic and Central European patterns seem to be the same as the English and Irish naming patterns. http://www.genealogy.com/genealogy/35_donna.html?Welcome=994774593 http://www.rootsweb.com/~genepool/naming.htm http://www.rootsource.com/names.htm http://www.tcarden.com/tree/ensor/Name.html There was a large...
    Frank Kurchina Dec 9, 2006
  • (English) Merry Christmas and A Happy New Year (French) Joyeux Noël et Bonne Année (Italian) Buon Natale e Felice Anno Nuovo (Spanish) Feliz Navidad y Feliz Año Nuevo (Portuguese) Feliz Natal e Feliz Ano Novo (German) Fröhliche Weihnachten und Ein Fröhes Neues Jahr (Hungarian) Kellemes Karácsonyi Ünnepeket és Boldog Újévet (Slovak) Veselé vianoce a S^t'astný Nový Rok...
    Frank Dec 20, 2005
  • Yiddish Oy vey ( oi, yoy)... literally woe is me, but figuratively Oh brother, oh my gosh .... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yiddish Frank K
    Frank Dec 16, 2005
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  • Before WW I, Slovakia was part of Upper Hungary (Felvidék) and part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (1867-1918) and earlier a part of Hungary under the Austrian Empire. The 1896 Militär-Paß (passport) bearer was supposedly born in 1874 in Csetnek, Gömör meyge, Hungary now S^tínik, Slovakia. In 1896 Kotlarc^ík would have been about age 22 (military age). The common army was...
    Frank Dec 2, 2005
  • One of most common Slavic surname affixes is the one denoting gender of the bearer -ová (Slovak), -owa (Polish), and -oba (Russian). As a rule of Slovak grammar, female surnames end in -á, -ská, or -ová. The feminine form of the surnames is considered merely a separate form of same surname, not a distinct surname in itself. If the surname is adjectival in origin , i.e., ends in...
    Frank Nov 24, 2005
  • When Cyrillic alphabet is transliterated into Roman (Latin) alphabet, 5-7 different spellings are possible - all correct because there is no standard. Depends into which European language the place name or surname was transliterated to last ? For example, a town located in former Bukovina (which is now divided between the Ukraine and Romania) had 7 names in the Latin alphabet. 1...
    Frank Nov 23, 2005
  • Kovacs is the "occupational" Hungarian surname Kovács, meaning (black)smith. Probably 50,000 surname Kovács bearers just in Hungary. In Slovak spelled as Kovác^. Hungarian letter cs is equiv. to Slovak diacritic letter c^ = ch. In 1910 the Hungarian letter cs became obsolete. Equivalent occupational surnames : Czech Kovár^, Polish Kowal (w is pron. v), and in German Schmied. In...
    Frank Nov 11, 2005
  • Genealogical research services providers http://www.genealogy-heraldry.sk/slo/sluzby.html Frank K
    Frank Sep 26, 2005
  • --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@^$1, Nick Holcz wrote: > At 07:19 PM 21/09/2005, you wrote: > > >Joe, Becki, Bill et al, > > > >As you know the online Ellis Island Records (1892-1924) ship > >manifests are full of misspellings and mistranscriptions because the > >Mormon "volunteers" who did the transcribing spoke no foreign > >languages. > > > I think it would also be because the people at...
    Frank Sep 21, 2005
  • --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@^$1, "Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)" wrote: > As someone else posted, these manifests are two pages. Go back one page > to see the rest of her manifest. Taking a second look, I see where they > misread "Isowabanfakvu" from - on that page, her last permanent residence is > given as "Zsona-banfalva", and her mother is living in "Zsobanfalva". > > Not sure what to...
    Frank Sep 21, 2005