Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Surname opinions wanted

Expand Messages
  • dan wanchic
    I ve been researching my maternal line surname Granatovic from Trebisov. My gggrandfather was Andras Granatovic. My ggrandfather Josef and his two brothers
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 4 6:13 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      I've been researching my maternal line surname Granatovic from Trebisov.

      My gggrandfather was Andras Granatovic.

      My ggrandfather Josef and his two brothers changed the spelling
      to Granatovich in the US. My guess is because of pronouncing
      the ending 'c' as 'ch.

      My grandfathers' generation changed the spelling to Grantonic.

      I have several different theories on the meaning of Granatovic
      and I'd like to rule out some of my guesses. I'd like some opinions
      from the group. These are listed in my guess from highest to lowest
      probability.

      1. It's a trade name related to someone who imported or sold pomegranates
      since granatovnik is Slovak/Czech for pomegranate. Dropping the 'nik' and
      adding the 'ic' seems to be a plausible progression into a surname.

      2. It's a trade name related to someone who traded or sold garnets since
      granat is German for garnet. Adding the suffix 'ovic' results in Garnetson.
      Although the German population in Czech/Slovakia region is small, it is
      still
      a significant possibility.

      3. Similar scenerio as #2 but using an ethinic Russian origin since granat
      means
      pomegrante in Russian. But this case adding the 'ovic' the name would mean
      'son of pomegranate' I've found the Granatovich surname in Russia.

      4. Similar scenerio as #3 but Belarus or Ukranian origin. (I don't
      know the translation for these languages) I do see the Granat and
      Granatovich
      surname in searches in each country.

      5. It's a patronymic name corrupted by a double translation error when
      converting
      th given name Hranich to cryllic and back. Grana is the Russian translation
      of Hranich.

      6. It's a descriptive name loosely related to the reddish color of garnets
      or pomegranates.

      Any insight is greatly appreciated.

      Dan

      If this address bounces
      -- wa8vzq@...--
      -- Saint Cloud, MN --

      _________________________________________________________________
      Learn how to help protect your privacy and prevent fraud online at Tech
      Hacks & Scams. http://special.msn.com/msnbc/techsafety.armx
    • Frank
      ... . Expect surname was from Baltics, Scandanavia, and former Russian Empire. Given name Andrew (E) András (H) Ondrej/Andrej (Sk) Andreas (G) Ondrih (Cz)
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 4 7:58 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "dan wanchic" <wa8vzq@h...>
        wrote:
        > I've been researching my maternal line surname Granatovic from
        Trebisov.
        >
        > My gggrandfather was Andras Granatovic.
        >
        > My ggrandfather Josef and his two brothers changed the spelling
        > to Granatovich in the US. My guess is because of pronouncing
        > the ending 'c' as 'ch.
        >
        > My grandfathers' generation changed the spelling to Grantonic.
        >
        > I have several different theories on the meaning of Granatovic
        > and I'd like to rule out some of my guesses. I'd like some opinions
        > from the group. These are listed in my guess from highest to lowest
        > probability.
        >
        > 1. It's a trade name related to someone who imported or sold
        pomegranates
        > since granatovnik is Slovak/Czech for pomegranate. Dropping the
        'nik' and
        > adding the 'ic' seems to be a plausible progression into a surname.
        >
        > 2. It's a trade name related to someone who traded or sold garnets
        since
        > granat is German for garnet. Adding the suffix 'ovic' results in
        Garnetson.
        > Although the German population in Czech/Slovakia region is small,
        it is
        > still
        > a significant possibility.
        >
        > 3. Similar scenerio as #2 but using an ethinic Russian origin since
        granat
        > means
        > pomegrante in Russian. But this case adding the 'ovic' the name
        would mean
        > 'son of pomegranate' I've found the Granatovich surname in Russia.
        >
        > 4. Similar scenerio as #3 but Belarus or Ukranian origin. (I don't
        > know the translation for these languages) I do see the Granat and
        > Granatovich
        > surname in searches in each country.
        >
        > 5. It's a patronymic name corrupted by a double translation error
        when
        > converting
        > th given name Hranich to cryllic and back. Grana is the Russian
        translation
        > of Hranich.
        >
        > 6. It's a descriptive name loosely related to the reddish color of
        garnets
        > or pomegranates.
        >
        > Any insight is greatly appreciated.
        >
        > Dan
        >
        > If this address bounces
        > -- wa8vzq@c...
        > -- Saint Cloud, MN --

        Dan,

        Many interesting speculations.
        My surname opinion input.

        Many emigrants changed names after ariival in the US.

        Ellis Island Records (EIR) list 232 surnames Granat.
        >From Russia, Sweden, Finland, Belarus, Hungary, Mexico, and other
        countries.
        I didn't see a Andras or Andrew in this group to match your gggrandfather.=
        .

        Expect surname was from Baltics, Scandanavia, and former Russian Empire.

        Given name Andrew (E) András (H) Ondrej/Andrej (Sk) Andreas (G)
        Ondrih (Cz) Andrezej (P) Andriejus (Lith) A h d p e u (Rus)

        In Slovak, granát = grenade, shell
        granátovy' = a garnet jewel (s^perk)
        granátové jablko (apple) = a pomegranate

        Pomegranate is a fruit native to SW Asia and grown in warm countries.
        I doubt if the climate in Upper Hungary (Slovakia) was warm enough
        to cultivate such a crop for the Hapsburg rulers of Austria-Hungary.
        Perhaps the Russian tsars could savor pomegranates.

        Garnet mining is carried on in US (NY, MT) in S.A, in Mexico, South
        Africa and elsewhere in the world.

        Hungarians had a surname ending -ics which was not native to Hungarian
        but a phonetic adaptation i.e. written -ics pron. ick.
        Magyar letter "cs" =ch was equivalent to Slovak diacritic letter c^ =ch.

        In 1905, a Josef Granatovics, age 33 (b. abt. 1869, Hungarian,
        married,
        had emigrated from To"keterebes (H) Trebis^ov (Sk) to his brother in
        Mingo Junction, Jefferson CO OH (which is located at the WVA border)
        Couldn't read the brother's given name , perhaps Juraj (George ) ?

        Frank K

        __________________________________________
        _______________________
        > Learn how to help protect your privacy and prevent fraud online at
        Tech
        > Hacks & Scams. http://special.msn.com/msnbc/techsafety.armx
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.