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Re: introduction and question

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  • Frank
    ... and an offer to help. ... supposedly emigrated ... additionally the koewicz dos it have any significance. ps forgive typing ordered new keyboard ...
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 3, 2004
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      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "jojo" <kcsped@c...> wrote:
      > Hello my name is Dora. Getting ready to crawl in bed, one question
      and an offer to help.
      >
      > A fabulas find today found out name and spelling of grand mother,
      supposedly emigrated
      > from Austria-hungry 1913. Would anyone have any thoughts on name ,
      additionally the "koewicz" dos it have any significance. ps
      forgive typing ordered new keyboard
      > tessie nazarkiewicz
      >
      > I have ordered and received lds tapes on new York births 1908,
      1921-1922
      > and deaths 1918-1921 would look up any needed
      >
      > Dora

      Dora,

      Thoughts on name.

      The South Slavic surname affix -ic'/-vic', -ovic' pron. ovich, means
      'son of '(clan name)
      in Croatian. This special ending also has the same meaning in
      Russian.
      Similar to Polish surname affix -owicz or -ewicz or -owycz which is
      pronounced
      the same as and means the same thing as 'son of'' above.
      In Czech -ovic^ or -evic^.
      In Russian and Ukrainian -ovich/-ovych or -evich/-ovych (in Latin
      alphabet)
      In Polish the letter "cz" is pron. ch as are all those accented
      letters
      "c" in the other languages.

      Tessie (E) is form of given name Theresa (P) dim. Teresa, Tesia, Tesa.
      Tereza (H)

      Nazar (from Greek/Russian and Latin (Nazarius *) can be a male given
      name.
      So perhaps surname Nazarkiewicz originally meant the patronymic "son
      of
      Nazar"

      (Probably taken from name of Patron Saint Nazarius *
      His father was a pagan Roman army officer, his mother a Christian.
      Raised a Christian, and taught religion by Saint Peter the Apostle.
      Friend of and co-worker with Saint Celsus.
      Evangelized in Milan. Martyred in the first persecution of Nero.
      Born 1st century at Rome, Italy
      Died beheaded c.68 in Milan, Italy; legend says that when Saint
      Ambrose of
      Milan discovered his tomb in 395, Nazarius's blood was still liquid;
      relics
      taken to the basilica of the Apostles in Milan)

      Many Polish surnames end in -ski or -cki.
      In older records you sometimes read -sky (before spelling rules
      were adapted); but in recent times tendency to insist on -ski.
      Probably a possessive affix added to name which evolved from person's
      characteristics (such as 'tall, short, etc.), occupation, or place
      of residence.
      In Czech and Slovak, the -sky is akin to the Polish -ski, while -cky
      is similar to Polish -cki.

      Slavic surnames can roughly divided into three main groups :

      those derived from original nicknames, such as names of animals,
      trees,
      things, physical characteristics, professions, etc.

      those derived from the Chrustian given name or profession of
      father (patronymics)

      those derived from names of towns, villages, regions, etc.
      (toponymics)

      Don't see Theresa Nazarkiewicz listed in 1913 Ellis Island Records
      (EIR)
      But 1913 EIR list two surnames Nazarkiewicz who were from Galicia and
      one surname from Martinow, Austria.
      Galicia was known as Austrian-Poland.

      >From the late 1700s until the end of WW I, Poland did not exist as a
      country. It was divided among the Russian, German (Prussian), and
      Austrian Empires. These divisions were known as Partitions.
      There was Russian-Poland, German-Poland, and Austrian-Poland.

      Galicia was formerly a Austrian Kronland and part of Austro-Hungarian
      Monarchy(1867-1918). Sometimes referred to as Austrian Poland.
      Other names for the area were Galicja (Polish), Galizien (German),
      Halychyna (Ukrainian) and Rus Halicka (Polish).

      In 1918, Galicia was annexed to Poland as "Malopolska" (Little
      Poland).
      After the 1939 partition of Poland by Germany and Russia, East Galicia
      became part of Ukraine while West Galicia remained in Poland.
      Its former territories are now shared between southern Poland and
      western Ukraine.

      Frank K
    • jojo
      Hello my name is Dora. Getting ready to crawl in bed, one question and an offer to help. A fabulas find today found out name and spelling of grand mother,
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 31, 2004
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        Hello my name is Dora. Getting ready to crawl in bed, one question and an offer to help.

        A fabulas find today found out name and spelling of grand mother, supposedly emigrated
        from Austria-hungry 1913. Would anyone have any thoughts on name , additionally the "koewicz" dos it have any significance. ps forgive typing ordered new keyboard
        tessie nazarkiewicz

        I have ordered and received lds tapes on new York births 1908, 1921-1922
        and deaths 1918-1921 would look up any needed

        Dora

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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