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[S-R] New to list and looking for Markowicz/Markovitch Information

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  • Melissa
    Hello. I just recently subscribed to this list. Thank you for letting me be a part. I descend from a Michael Markowicz/Markovich/Markovitch and Martha Cody.
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 23, 2004
      Hello. I just recently subscribed to this list. Thank you for letting me be
      a part. I descend from a Michael Markowicz/Markovich/Markovitch and Martha
      Cody. Census records from 1910 tell me they are Polish but I know from my
      family and the 1920 census that they are Slovakian from Austria-Czech (That
      is what it says on the 1920 census for birthplace). Mike emigrated in 1896
      and Martha 1899. I found a record for Martha Markowicz on the Ellis Island
      site that says she came from Nilik, Galicia. I have tried to find
      information on this but come up clueless. Does anyone have any further
      information? The record also says she came over with a child named Paraska
      even though my family has never heard of this name but knew a Katie that
      seems to match the dates for age, etc..Would families change the names of
      children after arriving sometimes? Also, are Ellis Island records sometimes
      way off on age? The Martha record says she was 30 but she would have been
      closer to 35. Not too far off and possibly I can understand that one. I
      found another record for a Michael Markowicz for 1896 but it says his age as
      18. He would have been closer to 26. It also says he was from Russia so I'm
      not so sure if it's my great grandfather or not. Census records say that
      Martha is Slovakian as well and her parents were but from my research Cody
      is an Irish surname. My mother also says she was Slovakian. Does anyone know
      anything maybe about this name? Maybe if it translates into a Slovakian
      name? Sorry this post is so long. I promise they won't be in the future. I
      just have so very little to go on and am finding very little information on
      my mother's family. Thank you for any help anyone can give me.

      Melissa
    • Caye Caswick
      I go to church with a Rusyn/Ukrainian woman with the first name Paraskeva -- and she goes by Pearl -- although the Katie might be a nickname for the ending of
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 23, 2004
        I go to church with a Rusyn/Ukrainian woman with the first name Paraskeva -- and she goes by Pearl -- although the Katie might be a nickname for the ending of her name -- it's possible.

        I also saw this name mentioned at a Carpatho-Rusyn genealogy site, but cannot remember which one I saw it on now -- but you should run the name on the internet, I bet you'll find out more. Good luck in your search and welcome to our group.


        Caye



        Melissa <misfethr@...> wrote:
        Hello. I just recently subscribed to this list. Thank you for letting me be
        a part. I descend from a Michael Markowicz/Markovich/Markovitch and Martha
        Cody. Census records from 1910 tell me they are Polish but I know from my
        family and the 1920 census that they are Slovakian from Austria-Czech (That
        is what it says on the 1920 census for birthplace). Mike emigrated in 1896
        and Martha 1899. I found a record for Martha Markowicz on the Ellis Island
        site that says she came from Nilik, Galicia. I have tried to find
        information on this but come up clueless. Does anyone have any further
        information? The record also says she came over with a child named Paraska
        even though my family has never heard of this name but knew a Katie that
        seems to match the dates for age, etc..Would families change the names of
        children after arriving sometimes? Also, are Ellis Island records sometimes
        way off on age? The Martha record says she was 30 but she would have been
        closer to 35. Not too far off and possibly I can understand that one. I
        found another record for a Michael Markowicz for 1896 but it says his age as
        18. He would have been closer to 26. It also says he was from Russia so I'm
        not so sure if it's my great grandfather or not. Census records say that
        Martha is Slovakian as well and her parents were but from my research Cody
        is an Irish surname. My mother also says she was Slovakian. Does anyone know
        anything maybe about this name? Maybe if it translates into a Slovakian
        name? Sorry this post is so long. I promise they won't be in the future. I
        just have so very little to go on and am finding very little information on
        my mother's family. Thank you for any help anyone can give me.

        Melissa


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      • Richard D. Custer
        ... be ... (That ... Melissa, You re looking for Milik / Mylyk, a village in Poland near the Slovak border. (The nearest town is Krynica.) It was an
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 23, 2004
          > Hello. I just recently subscribed to this list. Thank you for letting me
          be
          > a part. I descend from a Michael Markowicz/Markovich/Markovitch and Martha
          > Cody. Census records from 1910 tell me they are Polish but I know from my
          > family and the 1920 census that they are Slovakian from Austria-Czech
          (That
          > is what it says on the 1920 census for birthplace). Mike emigrated in 1896
          > and Martha 1899. I found a record for Martha Markowicz on the Ellis Island
          > site that says she came from Nilik, Galicia. I have tried to find

          Melissa,
          You're looking for Milik / Mylyk, a village in Poland near the Slovak
          border. (The nearest town is Krynica.) It was an ethnically Rusyn (of the
          Lemko subgroup) village until 1947 when the Rusyns were deported during the
          "Vistula Operation"/"Akcja Wisla".

          On Mylyk, see:

          list of families owning land in 1787: (Markowicz is there)
          http://www.carpatho-rusyn.org/new/194.htm

          Photo of the village church & a bit of info:
          http://lemko.org/lih/churchir/mylyk.html

          On Rusyns / Lemkos in general, see:

          http://www.carpatho-rusyn.org
          http://www.c-rs.org
          http://www.lemko.org

          Good luck!

          Rich Custer
        • Frank
          ... letting me be ... Martha ... from my ... Austria-Czech (That ... in 1896 ... Island ... further ... Paraska ... that ... names of ... sometimes ... have
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 23, 2004
            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Melissa" <misfethr@h...> wrote:
            > Hello. I just recently subscribed to this list. Thank you for
            letting me be
            > a part. I descend from a Michael Markowicz/Markovich/Markovitch and
            Martha
            > Cody. Census records from 1910 tell me they are Polish but I know
            from my
            > family and the 1920 census that they are Slovakian from
            Austria-Czech (That
            > is what it says on the 1920 census for birthplace). Mike emigrated
            in 1896
            > and Martha 1899. I found a record for Martha Markowicz on the Ellis
            Island
            > site that says she came from Nilik, Galicia. I have tried to find
            > information on this but come up clueless. Does anyone have any
            further
            > information? The record also says she came over with a child named
            Paraska
            > even though my family has never heard of this name but knew a Katie
            that
            > seems to match the dates for age, etc..Would families change the
            names of
            > children after arriving sometimes? Also, are Ellis Island records
            sometimes
            > way off on age? The Martha record says she was 30 but she would
            have been
            > closer to 35. Not too far off and possibly I can understand that
            one. I
            > found another record for a Michael Markowicz for 1896 but it says
            his age as
            > 18. He would have been closer to 26. It also says he was from
            Russia so I'm
            > not so sure if it's my great grandfather or not. Census records say
            that
            > Martha is Slovakian as well and her parents were but from my
            research Cody
            > is an Irish surname. My mother also says she was Slovakian. Does
            anyone know
            > anything maybe about this name? Maybe if it translates into a
            Slovakian
            > name? Sorry this post is so long. I promise they won't be in the
            future. I
            > just have so very little to go on and am finding very little
            information on
            > my mother's family. Thank you for any help anyone can give me.
            >
            > Melissa

            Melissa,

            Hungarians had a surname ending -ics which was not native to Hungarian
            but a phonetic adaptation i.e. written -ics pron. ick.
            This was akin to South Slavic surname affix -ic'/-vic', -ovic' pron.
            ovich, meaning 'son of'.
            Similar to Polish surname affix -owicz or -owycz which (in Polish) is
            pronounced the same as and means the same thing as 'son of' (clan
            name)
            in
            Croatian.
            This special ending also has the same meaning in Russian.


            Many Polish surnames end in -ski or -cki.
            In older records you sometimes read -sky (before spelling rules
            were adapted); but in recent times tendency to insist on -ski.
            Probably a possessive affix added to name which evolved from person's
            characteristics (such as 'tall, short, etc.), occupation, or place
            of residence.
            In Czech and Slovak, the -sky is akin to the Polish -ski, while -cky
            is similar to Polish -cki.

            Slavic surnames can roughly divided into three main groups :

            Those derived from original nicknames, such as names of animals,
            trees,
            things, physical characteristics, professions, etc.

            those derived from the Chrustian given name or profession of
            father (patronymics)

            those derived from names of towns, villages, regions, etc.
            (toponymics)

            In many cases it is nearly impossible to determine if a given surname
            is derived from the name of a profession or from the name of the
            village
            which has this profession in its root.
            In middle ages there were villages where all the inhabitants were
            engaged in the same profession and bore the same surnames, and were
            not necessarily related.

            We can still learn something about a surname from the suffix that is
            present. The suffix -ski is commonly said to prove "noble" origin of
            a family.
            This was true about 200 years ago in Poland.
            Presently most people whose surnames end with -ski (or -cki which is
            a phonetic variant of -ski) originate from the former lower social
            classes. This phenomenon is easily explained because in the 19th
            century everybody wanted to be considered as "noble", thus many
            people improved their names with this suffix.

            The process of forming Polish surnames lasted several centuries.
            The noble class originally used "clan" names which later survived
            in the names of their coats of arms. Particular families within a
            clan used a surname derived from the name of the village(s) they
            owned.
            When a family moved, it was usual to change the surname as well.

            Cody
            http://www.irishorigins.com/Examples/Cody_Family_Records.HTML

            EIR lists 721 surnames Cody

            Many emigrants changed their name after arrival in the US.
            You are assuming your Cody had an Irish surname and name was spelled
            Cody
            and sounded the same.
            Expect the surname bearer had Slovak or Magyar name spelled Kody or
            Koday ?


            Did surname say

            How are you ?

            Conas tá tú ? or Go maith ? Irish Gaelic

            Ako sa más^ ? Slovak

            Jak sie masz ? Polish


            In 1899 Martha Makowicz, age 30, had emigrated to US with her
            daughter
            Paraska, age 9, to husband and father in Pittsburgh PA.
            Paraska (|| a p a c k a ) Cyrillic - is a Greek/Russian female given
            name derived
            from first name Paraskiewia (P)
            This suggests G.C or Orthodox religion .
            What was surname religion ?
            What was their address in Pittsburgh ?

            Katarzyna (Katherine) in Polish.
            Kasia (Kate) (P)
            Katerina, Katka, Katica in Slovak.

            Last residence was Milik (not Nilik) Galicia (now SE Poland) and
            located
            just across the NE Slovakia border and 7 miles distant from Stará
            L'ubovna,
            Slovakia.


            Now my reply to your query is a longer post. :-)

            Frank K
          • nhasior@aol.com
            Hi Melissa, here is an obituary. may give you some leads. Galicia was a part of south Poland, Northeast Slovakia and the Ukraine. I wonder if the name
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 23, 2004
              Hi Melissa, here is an obituary. may give you some leads. Galicia was a
              part of south Poland, Northeast Slovakia and the Ukraine. I wonder if the name
              Paraska is a title or a first name.
              Noreen



              Paraska Olga Zawadiwsky




              Paraska Olga Zawadiwsky, age 78, of Karpathy Lane, Plymouth, passed away in
              Milwaukee, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2004.

              She was born Oct. 10, 1925, in the Ukraine. Before coming to the U.S., she
              had been a member of the Ukrainian Insurgent Army, (UPA).

              She was the devoted wife of Bohdan Zawadiwsky, married for 45 years. They had
              made their home in New York City, where they became naturalized American
              citizens. They later moved to Chicago, Sheboygan and Milwaukee and in retirement,
              moved to the Town of Plymouth, where they established the Ukrainian community,
              Karpathy, in the Kettle Moraine.

              As a Byzantine Ukrainian Catholic, she was an active member of the Church in
              New York City, St. Nicholas parish in Chicago and St. Michael’s parish in
              Milwaukee.

              Olga was actively involved in Ukrainian culture, making Ukrainian Eggs,
              embroidery and Ukrainian cuisine, and in the dissemination of Ukrainian culture in
              America. Olga enjoyed her country home where she loved nature and wildlife,
              spending time gardening and keeping her beehives. Her husband preceded her in
              death Dec. 27, 1993.

              She is the loving mother and grandmother of her daughter, Christina, and two
              sons, George Gregory and his daughter Sarah, and Don Joseph and his wife
              Rebecca, all of Milwaukee.

              A private family service will be held Tuesday, Jan. 13, at the Wittkopp
              Funeral Home in Plymouth. Burial will be in the Plymouth Woodlawn Cemetery.

              The Sheboygan Press

              January 10, 2004


               





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Melissa
              ... the ... Rich, thanks for all the information. It was a tremendous help! I was able to find out alot and confirm alot of things told to me by my family. It
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 24, 2004
                > Melissa,
                > You're looking for Milik / Mylyk, a village in Poland near the Slovak
                > border. (The nearest town is Krynica.) It was an ethnically Rusyn (of the
                > Lemko subgroup) village until 1947 when the Rusyns were deported during
                the
                > "Vistula Operation"/"Akcja Wisla".
                >
                > On Mylyk, see:
                >
                > list of families owning land in 1787: (Markowicz is there)
                > http://www.carpatho-rusyn.org/new/194.htm
                >
                > Photo of the village church & a bit of info:
                > http://lemko.org/lih/churchir/mylyk.html
                >
                > On Rusyns / Lemkos in general, see:
                >
                > http://www.carpatho-rusyn.org
                > http://www.c-rs.org
                > http://www.lemko.org
                >
                > Good luck!
                >
                > Rich Custer


                Rich, thanks for all the information. It was a tremendous help! I was able
                to find out alot and confirm alot of things told to me by my family. It
                would explain why my great grandfather's Ellis Island record says that he is
                Russian. Seems he was actually Rusyn more than likely. This list has helped
                me to fill in some missing gaps.

                Melissa
              • Melissa
                Frank K wrote: Cody http://www.irishorigins.com/Examples/Cody_Family_Records.HTML EIR lists 721 surnames Cody Many emigrants changed their name after arrival
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 24, 2004
                  Frank K wrote:

                  Cody
                  http://www.irishorigins.com/Examples/Cody_Family_Records.HTML

                  EIR lists 721 surnames Cody

                  Many emigrants changed their name after arrival in the US.
                  You are assuming your Cody had an Irish surname and name was spelled
                  Cody
                  and sounded the same.
                  Expect the surname bearer had Slovak or Magyar name spelled Kody or
                  Koday ?



                  What was surname religion ?
                  What was their address in Pittsburgh ?



                  Ken,

                  As for the Martha Cody, she was already married to my great grandfather when
                  she arrived here so the only way I know her surname was through family
                  members and my grandfather's death certificate that says her surname was
                  Cody even though census records say she was from Aust-Slovakia and spoke
                  Slovakian and so did her parents. I'm thinking it was something similar but
                  like most surnames it seems, got changed when she arrived here.

                  Right now I'm not sure if my great grandparents were Greek catholic or
                  Orthodox religion. The Mylyk area from my reading seem to mainly be of the
                  Greek Catholic religion.

                  On the Ellis Island record it says they were headed to 123 N. Ken St. in
                  Pittsburgh but I haven't found any records on them in Pittsburgh yet. The
                  earliest record I have of them other than Ellis Island is in Dunlo, PA in
                  1910.


                  I think I will try searching on Kody and Koday surnames and see what I come
                  up with for the Slovakian areas.

                  Thanks once again for more ideas on what I can research.

                  Melissa
                • Melissa
                  Noreen thanks for the info and obit. I never thought of Paraska as a title, only as a first name meaning Pearl. I ll have to see if I can find out more about
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 24, 2004
                    Noreen thanks for the info and obit. I never thought of Paraska as a title,
                    only as a first name meaning Pearl. I'll have to see if I can find out more
                    about that. It was interesting and insightful to read about another Paraska.

                    Melissa




                    Hi Melissa, here is an obituary. may give you some leads. Galicia was a
                    part of south Poland, Northeast Slovakia and the Ukraine. I wonder if the
                    name
                    Paraska is a title or a first name.
                    Noreen
                  • John M,
                    ... According to a published list of Lemko Rusyn given names Paraska is the short form for the woman s name Paraskevia. The Lemko, a western branch of Rusyns,
                    Message 9 of 9 , Feb 24, 2004
                      At 08:33 AM 2/24/2004 -0500, you wrote:
                      >Noreen thanks for the info and obit. I never thought of Paraska as a title,
                      >only as a first name meaning Pearl. I'll have to see if I can find out more
                      >about that. It was interesting and insightful to read about another Paraska.
                      >
                      >Melissa

                      According to a published list of Lemko Rusyn given names Paraska is the
                      short form for the woman's name Paraskevia. The Lemko, a western branch of
                      Rusyns, live/lived in SE Poland and NE Slovakia. I believe the name is
                      derived from the "Holy Great-Martyr Paraskevia of Iconomium" (3rd c.).


                      John M
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