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Re: [S-R] terms for family members

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  • Vladimir Bohinc
    Dear Joe, Svagor is the brother of my wife. Svokor and svokra are her parents. We had a joke: Show a photo of your svokra in a drug store and you can get any
    Message 1 of 20 , Dec 5, 2003
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      Dear Joe,
      Svagor is the brother of my wife.
      Svokor and svokra are her parents.
      We had a joke:
      Show a photo of your svokra in a drug store and you can get any poison
      without prescription.
      They are very understandable people:-)
      Vladimir

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)" <JArmata@...>
      To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, December 06, 2003 3:36 AM
      Subject: Re: [S-R] terms for family members


      > Kinship terms are really complicated! The old Slavs seemed to
      > have a separate word for every sort of relationship; and the old
      > terms along with imports from German and Hungarian are often used
      > in different ways in different parts of the country.
      >
      > Unfortunately, s~vagor can be either: father-in-law or
      > brother-in-law, depending on local usage. For father-in-law, it
      > traditionally refers to the wife's parents, though it wouldn't be
      > surprising if it were used for the husband's father too
      > somewhere.
      >
      > Tyotka/tetka/tsetka and variations are general terms for aunt.
      >
      > Traditionally, terms based on stri-/stry- refer to uncles and
      > aunts on your father's side, while those with vuj-/uj- refer to
      > uncles and aunts on your mother's side.
      >
      > So striko and strina would be uncle and aunt respectively on the
      > father's side, while vuyko and vuyna would be the same on the
      > mother's side.
      >
      > Joe
      >
      >
      > > Does anyone know the precise relationship for "sovgor" (shovgor)? Based
      > > on some old photos and letters I had thoght "sovgor" meant
      > > brother-in-law, but recently some Russian exchange students told me
      > > "sovgor" was father-in-law.
      > >
      > > Recently someone had wrote about the terms used for various family
      > > members; in letters from Uzhgorod to my grandmother her neices who grew
      > > up in the Austro-Hungarian and Czechoslovak periods addressed her as
      > > "Tyutka" - but their children who grew up in USSR after WWII addressed
      > > my grandparents as "Strika i Strina". My grandmother sometimes used a
      > > word which sounded to me like "way-ka" for "uncle".
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
      http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
      SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
      > __________ Informacia od NOD32 1.557 (20031114) __________
      >
      > Tato sprava bola preverena antivirusovym systemom NOD32.
      > http://www.eset.sk
      >
      >
    • nhasior@aol.com
      In a message dated 12/6/03 3:27:31 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... Vladimir, we will tell your mother in law what you said. hahahaha :O) Noreen [Non-text
      Message 2 of 20 , Dec 6, 2003
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        In a message dated 12/6/03 3:27:31 AM Eastern Standard Time,
        konekta@... writes:

        > Show a photo of your svokra in a drug store and you can get any poison
        > without prescription.
        >

        Vladimir,
        we will tell your mother in law what you said. hahahaha :O)
        Noreen


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Vladimir Bohinc
        Noreen, She knows that all right. That s why she never wants to eat my delicious cooking:-) A discouraging My to ne jedavame = We don t eat that.; is always
        Message 3 of 20 , Dec 6, 2003
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          Noreen,
          She knows that all right. That's why she never wants to eat my delicious
          cooking:-)
          A discouraging " My to ne jedavame" = We don't eat that.; is always the
          answer.
          But I'll keep trying.
          Vladimir


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: <nhasior@...>
          To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, December 06, 2003 5:30 PM
          Subject: Re: [S-R] terms for family members


          > In a message dated 12/6/03 3:27:31 AM Eastern Standard Time,
          > konekta@... writes:
          >
          > > Show a photo of your svokra in a drug store and you can get any poison
          > > without prescription.
          > >
          >
          > Vladimir,
          > we will tell your mother in law what you said. hahahaha :O)
          > Noreen
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
          http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
          SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
          >
          > __________ Informacia od NOD32 1.573 (20031205) __________
          >
          > Tato sprava bola preverena antivirusovym systemom NOD32.
          > http://www.eset.sk
          >
          >
        • Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)
          Hi Vlad! The Ethnographic Atlas of Slovakia has a map for terms for parents-in-law. Looking at it closely, svokor/svokra is by far the most common, it blankets
          Message 4 of 20 , Dec 6, 2003
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            Hi Vlad! The Ethnographic Atlas of Slovakia has a map for terms
            for parents-in-law.

            Looking at it closely, svokor/svokra is by far the most common,
            it blankets the country, with other terms marked as smaller areas
            all over the place.

            Other terms are test/testina, svat/svacha, svagor/svagrina,
            apos/anos (Hungarian areas), ipamuram/napamason (Hungarian
            areas), svigerfater/svigermuter (German areas); quite a few areas
            are marked as having no special terms for parents-in-law - I
            guess some things are just not discussed there :^)!

            It looks like svagor/svagrina is used marked for
            father-in-law/mother-in-law in an area to the east of Topolcany.
            That usage is shown by blue stripes on the map, and it's really
            hard to tell the blue stripes from the green stripes elsewhere,
            but I think that's the only area with the blue stripes, so it
            might be limited to there.

            Joe


            >
            > Dear Joe,
            > Svagor is the brother of my wife.
            > Svokor and svokra are her parents.
            > We had a joke:
            > Show a photo of your svokra in a drug store and you can get any poison
            > without prescription.
            > They are very understandable people:-)
            > Vladimir
            >
          • Vladimir Bohinc
            Dear Joe, This matter is very complicated. I read about it now in the book Traditions of the slovak family and came to the conclusion, that for an individual,
            Message 5 of 20 , Dec 7, 2003
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              Dear Joe,
              This matter is very complicated. I read about it now in the book Traditions
              of the slovak family and came to the conclusion, that for an individual, it
              is the best just to ask his relatives for the terms they are using.
              These terms depend upon the geographical location, the time taken into
              consideration and even the ethnicity of the family. Although, they are let
              us say slovak families, in fact, many were of different ethnicities, which
              have their own specifics.
              And, of course, if you are using one term for a particular person, your
              child can not use the same term, your wife can not use the same term etc.
              This is when it gets complicated. What to remember and for who'se use?
              The book says, that parents often were practicing using terms, that their
              children were suppose to use, just to teach their own children of correct
              terms.
              So, when the mother said: " Ujo prisiel", it was an Ujo to the child, not to
              her.
              I read, that there about 35 to 40 such terms to be found on the territory of
              Slovakia in different times.
              In general, any strange man is an Ujo to the child.At least here, in Western
              Slovakia.
              Vladimir

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)" <JArmata@...>
              To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Sunday, December 07, 2003 3:02 AM
              Subject: Re: [S-R] terms for family members


              > Hi Vlad! The Ethnographic Atlas of Slovakia has a map for terms
              > for parents-in-law.
              >
              > Looking at it closely, svokor/svokra is by far the most common,
              > it blankets the country, with other terms marked as smaller areas
              > all over the place.
              >
              > Other terms are test/testina, svat/svacha, svagor/svagrina,
              > apos/anos (Hungarian areas), ipamuram/napamason (Hungarian
              > areas), svigerfater/svigermuter (German areas); quite a few areas
              > are marked as having no special terms for parents-in-law - I
              > guess some things are just not discussed there :^)!
              >
              > It looks like svagor/svagrina is used marked for
              > father-in-law/mother-in-law in an area to the east of Topolcany.
              > That usage is shown by blue stripes on the map, and it's really
              > hard to tell the blue stripes from the green stripes elsewhere,
              > but I think that's the only area with the blue stripes, so it
              > might be limited to there.
              >
              > Joe
              >
              >
              > >
              > > Dear Joe,
              > > Svagor is the brother of my wife.
              > > Svokor and svokra are her parents.
              > > We had a joke:
              > > Show a photo of your svokra in a drug store and you can get any poison
              > > without prescription.
              > > They are very understandable people:-)
              > > Vladimir
              > >
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
              http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
              SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >
              > __________ Informacia od NOD32 1.573 (20031205) __________
              >
              > Tato sprava bola preverena antivirusovym systemom NOD32.
              > http://www.eset.sk
              >
              >
            • nhasior@aol.com
              Maybe all of these terms were for a very good purpose. Slovak children certainly knew what relationship each adult was to them. That they would be so
              Message 6 of 20 , Dec 7, 2003
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                Maybe all of these terms were for a very good purpose. Slovak children
                certainly knew what relationship each adult was to them. That they would be so
                specific must have, at one time, been decided out of some sort of necessity.
                Noreen


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • christopher gajda
                on photo s from my relatives in Uzhgorod they wrote the word sovgor to identify one man; I thought it might have been a misspelling of svogor but in his
                Message 7 of 20 , Dec 8, 2003
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                  on photo's from my relatives in Uzhgorod they wrote the word "sovgor" to identify one man; I thought it might have been a misspelling of "svogor" but in his funeral pictures there is a wreath that has "shovgor" written in Cyrillic. Is this some kind of regional variation or is this an entirely different word?

                  Vladimir Bohinc <konekta@...> wrote:Dear Joe,
                  Svagor is the brother of my wife.
                  Svokor and svokra are her parents.
                  We had a joke:
                  Show a photo of your svokra in a drug store and you can get any poison
                  without prescription.
                  They are very understandable people:-)
                  Vladimir

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)" <JArmata@...>
                  To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Saturday, December 06, 2003 3:36 AM
                  Subject: Re: [S-R] terms for family members


                  > Kinship terms are really complicated! The old Slavs seemed to
                  > have a separate word for every sort of relationship; and the old
                  > terms along with imports from German and Hungarian are often used
                  > in different ways in different parts of the country.
                  >
                  > Unfortunately, s~vagor can be either: father-in-law or
                  > brother-in-law, depending on local usage. For father-in-law, it
                  > traditionally refers to the wife's parents, though it wouldn't be
                  > surprising if it were used for the husband's father too
                  > somewhere.
                  >
                  > Tyotka/tetka/tsetka and variations are general terms for aunt.
                  >
                  > Traditionally, terms based on stri-/stry- refer to uncles and
                  > aunts on your father's side, while those with vuj-/uj- refer to
                  > uncles and aunts on your mother's side.
                  >
                  > So striko and strina would be uncle and aunt respectively on the
                  > father's side, while vuyko and vuyna would be the same on the
                  > mother's side.
                  >
                  > Joe
                  >
                  >
                  > > Does anyone know the precise relationship for "sovgor" (shovgor)? Based
                  > > on some old photos and letters I had thoght "sovgor" meant
                  > > brother-in-law, but recently some Russian exchange students told me
                  > > "sovgor" was father-in-law.
                  > >
                  > > Recently someone had wrote about the terms used for various family
                  > > members; in letters from Uzhgorod to my grandmother her neices who grew
                  > > up in the Austro-Hungarian and Czechoslovak periods addressed her as
                  > > "Tyutka" - but their children who grew up in USSR after WWII addressed
                  > > my grandparents as "Strika i Strina". My grandmother sometimes used a
                  > > word which sounded to me like "way-ka" for "uncle".
                  >
                  >
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                  http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
                  SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > __________ Informacia od NOD32 1.557 (20031114) __________
                  >
                  > Tato sprava bola preverena antivirusovym systemom NOD32.
                  > http://www.eset.sk
                  >
                  >


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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Vladimir Bohinc
                  Dear Christopher, It is one of the two possibilities, where I would think, it rather means brother in law. But, to be sure, one would have to ask somebody,
                  Message 8 of 20 , Dec 12, 2003
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                    Dear Christopher,
                    It is one of the two possibilities, where I would think, it rather means
                    brother in law.
                    But, to be sure, one would have to ask somebody, that is more acquainted
                    with Rusyn terms of this sort.
                    Vladimir

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "christopher gajda" <christophergajda@...>
                    To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Monday, December 08, 2003 7:19 PM
                    Subject: Re: [S-R] terms for family members


                    > on photo's from my relatives in Uzhgorod they wrote the word "sovgor" to
                    identify one man; I thought it might have been a misspelling of "svogor" but
                    in his funeral pictures there is a wreath that has "shovgor" written in
                    Cyrillic. Is this some kind of regional variation or is this an entirely
                    different word?
                    >
                    > Vladimir Bohinc <konekta@...> wrote:Dear Joe,
                    > Svagor is the brother of my wife.
                    > Svokor and svokra are her parents.
                    > We had a joke:
                    > Show a photo of your svokra in a drug store and you can get any poison
                    > without prescription.
                    > They are very understandable people:-)
                    > Vladimir
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: "Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)" <JArmata@...>
                    > To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
                    > Sent: Saturday, December 06, 2003 3:36 AM
                    > Subject: Re: [S-R] terms for family members
                    >
                    >
                    > > Kinship terms are really complicated! The old Slavs seemed to
                    > > have a separate word for every sort of relationship; and the old
                    > > terms along with imports from German and Hungarian are often used
                    > > in different ways in different parts of the country.
                    > >
                    > > Unfortunately, s~vagor can be either: father-in-law or
                    > > brother-in-law, depending on local usage. For father-in-law, it
                    > > traditionally refers to the wife's parents, though it wouldn't be
                    > > surprising if it were used for the husband's father too
                    > > somewhere.
                    > >
                    > > Tyotka/tetka/tsetka and variations are general terms for aunt.
                    > >
                    > > Traditionally, terms based on stri-/stry- refer to uncles and
                    > > aunts on your father's side, while those with vuj-/uj- refer to
                    > > uncles and aunts on your mother's side.
                    > >
                    > > So striko and strina would be uncle and aunt respectively on the
                    > > father's side, while vuyko and vuyna would be the same on the
                    > > mother's side.
                    > >
                    > > Joe
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > > Does anyone know the precise relationship for "sovgor" (shovgor)?
                    Based
                    > > > on some old photos and letters I had thoght "sovgor" meant
                    > > > brother-in-law, but recently some Russian exchange students told me
                    > > > "sovgor" was father-in-law.
                    > > >
                    > > > Recently someone had wrote about the terms used for various family
                    > > > members; in letters from Uzhgorod to my grandmother her neices who
                    grew
                    > > > up in the Austro-Hungarian and Czechoslovak periods addressed her as
                    > > > "Tyutka" - but their children who grew up in USSR after WWII addressed
                    > > > my grandparents as "Strika i Strina". My grandmother sometimes used
                    a
                    > > > word which sounded to me like "way-ka" for "uncle".
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                    > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
                    > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > >
                    > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > __________ Informacia od NOD32 1.557 (20031114) __________
                    > >
                    > > Tato sprava bola preverena antivirusovym systemom NOD32.
                    > > http://www.eset.sk
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
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                  • marianne50614
                    Thanks for this string of messages re: terms for grandparents, aunts and uncles. My cousins and I have been curious about the identity of a woman whose
                    Message 9 of 20 , Dec 21, 2003
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                      Thanks for this string of messages re: terms for grandparents, aunts
                      and uncles. My cousins and I have been curious about the identity of
                      a woman whose identity is listed on the back of her old photo
                      as "Strina". The rest of the description we were unable to read
                      (sadly, my generation didn't learn to read Slovak or Rusyn).

                      Though my cousins and I share at least one great-great-grandfather
                      (GGF), we had all heard different terms for "aunt" or "uncle", and
                      the replies I've seen here have cleared up why they were different.
                      (Our paternal ancestors are related to one another.)

                      Question: How would one refer to their godparents? My mother
                      referred to her godmother as "Nina" and her godfather as "Bacsi" (I'm
                      not sure of the spelling; pronounced "bahch-ee", accent more on first
                      syllable). She wasn't sure if these were actually the terms for
                      godparents or more "terms of endearment" she was taught to use for
                      them.

                      MARIANNE


                      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Vladimir Bohinc" <konekta@n...>
                      wrote:
                      > Dear Christopher,
                      > It is one of the two possibilities, where I would think, it rather
                      means
                      > brother in law.
                      > But, to be sure, one would have to ask somebody, that is more
                      acquainted
                      > with Rusyn terms of this sort.
                      > Vladimir
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: "christopher gajda" <christophergajda@y...>
                      > To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
                      > Sent: Monday, December 08, 2003 7:19 PM
                      > Subject: Re: [S-R] terms for family members
                      >
                      >
                      > > on photo's from my relatives in Uzhgorod they wrote the
                      word "sovgor" to
                      > identify one man; I thought it might have been a misspelling
                      of "svogor" but
                      > in his funeral pictures there is a wreath that has "shovgor"
                      written in
                      > Cyrillic. Is this some kind of regional variation or is this an
                      entirely
                      > different word?
                      > >
                      > > Vladimir Bohinc <konekta@n...> wrote:Dear Joe,
                      > > Svagor is the brother of my wife.
                      > > Svokor and svokra are her parents.
                      > > We had a joke:
                      > > Show a photo of your svokra in a drug store and you can get any
                      poison
                      > > without prescription.
                      > > They are very understandable people:-)
                      > > Vladimir
                      > >
                      > > ----- Original Message -----
                      > > From: "Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)" <JArmata@g...>
                      > > To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
                      > > Sent: Saturday, December 06, 2003 3:36 AM
                      > > Subject: Re: [S-R] terms for family members
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > > Kinship terms are really complicated! The old Slavs seemed to
                      > > > have a separate word for every sort of relationship; and the old
                      > > > terms along with imports from German and Hungarian are often
                      used
                      > > > in different ways in different parts of the country.
                      > > >
                      > > > Unfortunately, s~vagor can be either: father-in-law or
                      > > > brother-in-law, depending on local usage. For father-in-law, it
                      > > > traditionally refers to the wife's parents, though it wouldn't
                      be
                      > > > surprising if it were used for the husband's father too
                      > > > somewhere.
                      > > >
                      > > > Tyotka/tetka/tsetka and variations are general terms for aunt.
                      > > >
                      > > > Traditionally, terms based on stri-/stry- refer to uncles and
                      > > > aunts on your father's side, while those with vuj-/uj- refer to
                      > > > uncles and aunts on your mother's side.
                      > > >
                      > > > So striko and strina would be uncle and aunt respectively on the
                      > > > father's side, while vuyko and vuyna would be the same on the
                      > > > mother's side.
                      > > >
                      > > > Joe
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > > Does anyone know the precise relationship for "sovgor"
                      (shovgor)?
                      > Based
                      > > > > on some old photos and letters I had thoght "sovgor" meant
                      > > > > brother-in-law, but recently some Russian exchange students
                      told me
                      > > > > "sovgor" was father-in-law.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Recently someone had wrote about the terms used for various
                      family
                      > > > > members; in letters from Uzhgorod to my grandmother her
                      neices who
                      > grew
                      > > > > up in the Austro-Hungarian and Czechoslovak periods addressed
                      her as
                      > > > > "Tyutka" - but their children who grew up in USSR after WWII
                      addressed
                      > > > > my grandparents as "Strika i Strina". My grandmother
                      sometimes used
                      > a
                      > > > > word which sounded to me like "way-ka" for "uncle".
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                      > > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank
                      email to
                      > > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      > > >
                      > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                      > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > __________ Informacia od NOD32 1.557 (20031114) __________
                      > > >
                      > > > Tato sprava bola preverena antivirusovym systemom NOD32.
                      > > > http://www.eset.sk
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
                      > >
                      > > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
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                    • William F Brna
                      Stryna is the wife of Stryc who is a paternal uncle. She would be an aunt on the father s side. Godfather is Krstnyotec and godmother is Krstnamat .
                      Message 10 of 20 , Dec 21, 2003
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                        "Stryna" is the wife of "Stryc" who is a paternal uncle. She would be an
                        aunt on the father's side. Godfather is "Krstnyotec" and godmother is
                        "Krstnamat". My parents also used "Kmotor" for godfather, but I do not
                        know the distinction, unless it referred to my mother's godfather as
                        opposed to mine.

                        William F. Brna

                        On Sun, 21 Dec 2003 17:00:26 -0000 "marianne50614" <mmpetruska@...>
                        writes:
                        > Thanks for this string of messages re: terms for grandparents, aunts
                        >
                        > and uncles. My cousins and I have been curious about the identity
                        > of
                        > a woman whose identity is listed on the back of her old photo
                        > as "Strina". The rest of the description we were unable to read
                        > (sadly, my generation didn't learn to read Slovak or Rusyn).
                        >
                        > Though my cousins and I share at least one great-great-grandfather
                        > (GGF), we had all heard different terms for "aunt" or "uncle", and
                        > the replies I've seen here have cleared up why they were different.
                        >
                        > (Our paternal ancestors are related to one another.)
                        >
                        > Question: How would one refer to their godparents? My mother
                        > referred to her godmother as "Nina" and her godfather as "Bacsi"
                        > (I'm
                        > not sure of the spelling; pronounced "bahch-ee", accent more on
                        > first
                        > syllable). She wasn't sure if these were actually the terms for
                        > godparents or more "terms of endearment" she was taught to use for
                        > them.
                        >
                        > MARIANNE
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Vladimir Bohinc"
                        > <konekta@n...>
                        > wrote:
                        > > Dear Christopher,
                        > > It is one of the two possibilities, where I would think, it rather
                        >
                        > means
                        > > brother in law.
                        > > But, to be sure, one would have to ask somebody, that is more
                        > acquainted
                        > > with Rusyn terms of this sort.
                        > > Vladimir
                        > >
                        > > ----- Original Message -----
                        > > From: "christopher gajda" <christophergajda@y...>
                        > > To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
                        > > Sent: Monday, December 08, 2003 7:19 PM
                        > > Subject: Re: [S-R] terms for family members
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > > on photo's from my relatives in Uzhgorod they wrote the
                        > word "sovgor" to
                        > > identify one man; I thought it might have been a misspelling
                        > of "svogor" but
                        > > in his funeral pictures there is a wreath that has "shovgor"
                        > written in
                        > > Cyrillic. Is this some kind of regional variation or is this an
                        > entirely
                        > > different word?
                        > > >
                        > > > Vladimir Bohinc <konekta@n...> wrote:Dear Joe,
                        > > > Svagor is the brother of my wife.
                        > > > Svokor and svokra are her parents.
                        > > > We had a joke:
                        > > > Show a photo of your svokra in a drug store and you can get any
                        >
                        > poison
                        > > > without prescription.
                        > > > They are very understandable people:-)
                        > > > Vladimir
                        > > >
                        > > > ----- Original Message -----
                        > > > From: "Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)" <JArmata@g...>
                        > > > To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
                        > > > Sent: Saturday, December 06, 2003 3:36 AM
                        > > > Subject: Re: [S-R] terms for family members
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > > Kinship terms are really complicated! The old Slavs seemed
                        > to
                        > > > > have a separate word for every sort of relationship; and the
                        > old
                        > > > > terms along with imports from German and Hungarian are often
                        > used
                        > > > > in different ways in different parts of the country.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Unfortunately, s~vagor can be either: father-in-law or
                        > > > > brother-in-law, depending on local usage. For father-in-law,
                        > it
                        > > > > traditionally refers to the wife's parents, though it wouldn't
                        >
                        > be
                        > > > > surprising if it were used for the husband's father too
                        > > > > somewhere.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Tyotka/tetka/tsetka and variations are general terms for
                        > aunt.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Traditionally, terms based on stri-/stry- refer to uncles and
                        > > > > aunts on your father's side, while those with vuj-/uj- refer
                        > to
                        > > > > uncles and aunts on your mother's side.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > So striko and strina would be uncle and aunt respectively on
                        > the
                        > > > > father's side, while vuyko and vuyna would be the same on the
                        > > > > mother's side.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Joe
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > > > Does anyone know the precise relationship for "sovgor"
                        > (shovgor)?
                        > > Based
                        > > > > > on some old photos and letters I had thoght "sovgor" meant
                        > > > > > brother-in-law, but recently some Russian exchange students
                        >
                        > told me
                        > > > > > "sovgor" was father-in-law.
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Recently someone had wrote about the terms used for various
                        >
                        > family
                        > > > > > members; in letters from Uzhgorod to my grandmother her
                        > neices who
                        > > grew
                        > > > > > up in the Austro-Hungarian and Czechoslovak periods
                        > addressed
                        > her as
                        > > > > > "Tyutka" - but their children who grew up in USSR after WWII
                        >
                        > addressed
                        > > > > > my grandparents as "Strika i Strina". My grandmother
                        > sometimes used
                        > > a
                        > > > > > word which sounded to me like "way-ka" for "uncle".
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
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                      • Milan Huba
                        Since nobody answered your specific query, let my give you my impression. Cetka appears to be a variation of Tetka which means aunt. The pronunciation of
                        Message 11 of 20 , Dec 22, 2003
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                          Since nobody answered your specific query, let my give you my impression.
                          "Cetka" appears to be a variation of "Tetka" which means aunt. The
                          pronunciation of words vary from area to area. My father and his family came
                          from central Slovakia (Liptov county) and my mother and her family from
                          western Slovakia around Bratislava. They spoke a different brand of Slovak,
                          sometimes pronouncing the very same work differently and other times using a
                          totally different word to mean the same thing.

                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: Susan Friedhaber-Hard [mailto:barclaypenn@...]
                          Sent: Friday, December 05, 2003 11:02 PM
                          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [S-R] terms for family members


                          Funny, I remember everyone calling my Slovak great aunt: Cetka.
                          Susan Friedhaber-Hard

                          pewterj <pewterj@...> wrote:
                          I remember calling my Slovak Aunt "Cetcie Annie". Does "Cetcie" mean
                          Aunt? I'm new to this group so please excuse my ignorance! Thanks.
                          Mary


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