Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Alyka/Alyi/Alya

Expand Messages
  • BeechCrRR@xxx.xxx
    In searching the church records I have come across the subject first name many times, spelled in each of the three ways (if I m reading the chicken scratch
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 20, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      In searching the church records I have come across the subject first name many times, spelled in each of the three ways (if I'm reading the chicken scratch correctly). I've been told this translates to the English "Elizabeth." Can anyone confirm? Also, of the three variations what is the "correct" spelling and what language is this? Latin? Hungarian? Thanks for any assistance you may be able to provide.
      Jeff
    • Maura Petzolt
      It s not Hungarian...... Elizabeth in Hungarian is Erzebet. In fact none of these are listed in my Hungarian girls names in _Handy Guide to Hungarian
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 20, 1999
      • 0 Attachment
        It's not Hungarian...... Elizabeth in Hungarian is Erzebet.

        In fact none of these are listed in my Hungarian girls names in _Handy
        Guide to Hungarian Genelogical Records_ by Suess.

        I would guess Alice in English, but don't know what language it would
        be... maybe Slovak or Russian? Alice and Aliz are Hungarian for Alice.
        Could also be Polish?

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        Maura Petzolt Mobile Alabama USA
        sabinov@...
        Helpful Hints for Successful Searching
        http://www.rootsweb.com/~irlwat/instruct.htm
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      • Andrea Vangor
        This is an old topic, if you mean the names Alyka and Alya. They are certainly eastern Slovak dialect versions of the name Elizabeth and are interchangeable
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 20, 1999
        • 0 Attachment
          This is an old topic, if you mean the names Alyka and Alya. They are
          certainly eastern Slovak dialect versions of the name Elizabeth and are
          interchangeable with Elisabetha and Erzebet in the records from Opina where
          I found a lot of dialect names. Some one on this or another list confirmed
          that Alyka for Elizabeth, Hanc~a for Anna, Bora for Barbara, Ondo/Ondko for
          Andrew, Janik for John, and Gyura for George are all eastern Slovak dialect
          names. I also found something that is probably Helena, the name Ilya, and
          something that looks like Ysok for Isaac, I suppose.

          The dialect names occurred from 1784 when the records start and end about
          ten years later,but they recur from time to time in later years -- I guess
          the minister forgot to use the Latin or Hungarian. I was thrilled to think
          that I had discovered the names that these people really used in their
          lives.

          Andrea

          Message -----
          From: Maura Petzolt <sabinov@...>
          To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@onelist.com>
          Sent: Monday, December 20, 1999 7:11 AM
          Subject: Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Alyka/Alyi/Alya


          > From: sabinov@... (Maura Petzolt)
          >
          > It's not Hungarian...... Elizabeth in Hungarian is Erzebet.
          >
          > In fact none of these are listed in my Hungarian girls names in _Handy
          > Guide to Hungarian Genelogical Records_ by Suess.
          >
          > I would guess Alice in English, but don't know what language it would
          > be... maybe Slovak or Russian? Alice and Aliz are Hungarian for Alice.
          > Could also be Polish?
          >
          > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          > Maura Petzolt Mobile Alabama USA
          > sabinov@...
          > Helpful Hints for Successful Searching
          > http://www.rootsweb.com/~irlwat/instruct.htm
          > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          >
          > >
        • BeechCrRR@aol.com
          Andrea & Maura, Many thanks for your input. So Alyka and Alya are both acceptable spellings or is only one of the two correct? And am I to assume Alyi should
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 20, 1999
          • 0 Attachment
            Andrea & Maura,

            Many thanks for your input.

            So Alyka and Alya are both acceptable spellings or is only one of the two
            correct? And am I to assume Alyi should be Alya? Yet another case of trying
            to decipher the old handwriting, I'm sure.

            As for the other names you list, Andrea, I got some help from (an almost)
            native Slovak some months back:

            Andreas=Onda (almost as you indicate),
            Elizabeth=Alzbeta,
            Anna=Hanca (as you indicate),
            Joannes=Johanca
            Barbara=Bora (as you indicate),
            Michael=Mizo
            Helena=Helenka
            George=Juraj (a different twist from what you have).

            The family of the person I received the above info from was from somewhere in
            Northern Slovakia so that may explain some of the differences from the
            Eastern Slovakia versions you have.

            Jeff


            << This is an old topic, if you mean the names Alyka and Alya. They are
            certainly eastern Slovak dialect versions of the name Elizabeth and are
            interchangeable with Elisabetha and Erzebet in the records from Opina where
            I found a lot of dialect names. Some one on this or another list confirmed
            that Alyka for Elizabeth, Hanc~a for Anna, Bora for Barbara, Ondo/Ondko for
            Andrew, Janik for John, and Gyura for George are all eastern Slovak dialect
            names. I also found something that is probably Helena, the name Ilya, and
            something that looks like Ysok for Isaac, I suppose.

            The dialect names occurred from 1784 when the records start and end about
            ten years later,but they recur from time to time in later years -- I guess
            the minister forgot to use the Latin or Hungarian. I was thrilled to think
            that I had discovered the names that these people really used in their
            lives.

            Andrea

            Message -----
            From: Maura Petzolt <sabinov@...>
            To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@onelist.com>
            Sent: Monday, December 20, 1999 7:11 AM
            Subject: Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Alyka/Alyi/Alya


            > From: sabinov@... (Maura Petzolt)
            >
            > It's not Hungarian...... Elizabeth in Hungarian is Erzebet.
            >
            > In fact none of these are listed in my Hungarian girls names in _Handy
            > Guide to Hungarian Genelogical Records_ by Suess.
            >
            > I would guess Alice in English, but don't know what language it would
            > be... maybe Slovak or Russian? Alice and Aliz are Hungarian for Alice.
            > Could also be Polish?
            >
            > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            > Maura Petzolt Mobile Alabama USA
            > sabinov@...
            > Helpful Hints for Successful Searching
            > http://www.rootsweb.com/~irlwat/instruct.htm
            > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >>
          • Andrea Vangor
            Dear Jeff and List, I think that eastern Slovaks had regular versions of common Christian names, and variants. I have seen Ani/y for Anna, Alya for
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 20, 1999
            • 0 Attachment
              Dear Jeff and List,

              I think that eastern Slovaks had "regular" versions of common Christian
              names, and variants. I have seen Ani/y for Anna, Alya for Alyka/Elizabeth,
              etc. Probably Alyka is the diminutive of Alya. The name that threw me the
              most looks like "Yook" but is probably Ysak.

              Did you notice how often the minister/recorder draws a line over a consonant
              to indicate that it is supposed to be two letters, Joanes for example. I
              think that some of these names went out of style or were further altered
              later in the 19th century. Bora seems to be written more often as Borka in
              the mid-century.

              I thought Opina was bad, until I got the microfilm for C~ervenica...

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: <BeechCrRR@...>
              To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@onelist.com>
              Sent: Monday, December 20, 1999 3:17 PM
              Subject: Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Alyka/Alyi/Alya


              > From: BeechCrRR@...
              >
              > Andrea & Maura,
              >
              > Many thanks for your input.
              >
              > So Alyka and Alya are both acceptable spellings or is only one of the two
              > correct? And am I to assume Alyi should be Alya? Yet another case of
              trying
              > to decipher the old handwriting, I'm sure.
              >
              > As for the other names you list, Andrea, I got some help from (an almost)
              > native Slovak some months back:
              >
              > Andreas=Onda (almost as you indicate),
              > Elizabeth=Alzbeta,
              > Anna=Hanca (as you indicate),
              > Joannes=Johanca
              > Barbara=Bora (as you indicate),
              > Michael=Mizo
              > Helena=Helenka
              > George=Juraj (a different twist from what you have).
              >
              > The family of the person I received the above info from was from somewhere
              in
              > Northern Slovakia so that may explain some of the differences from the
              > East
              >
            • JArcher360@xxx.xxx
              Just catching up on things. Names used in daily lives was one of the topics--my grandmother was christened Maria, but her friends always called her Mera.
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 27, 1999
              • 0 Attachment
                Just catching up on things. Names used in daily lives was one of the
                topics--my grandmother was christened Maria, but her friends always called
                her "Mera." The Pronunciation has that "r" which sounds more like a cross
                between an r and a t, much like the r in stara. My aunt was called Vajlika
                which I gathered was the diminutive for Valeria, the name on her baptismal
                certificate from Slovakia. My mother was always called Aranka, but in the
                US, Irene was used. Another of my aunts was Bozhena,(English spelling, don't
                have a hacek on this machine.) and there is not really an English equivalent,
                someone chose Blanche. My other aunt was addressed as Lenorah, which someone
                decided was Eleanor. There wasn't much Slovak to English distortion with
                Josef and Jan. I guess what I am wondering was how many names were not only
                Latinized or Anglicized, but were chosen by the clergy? And like y'all--I
                find it much more interesting to know what names people actually used as real
                people. Caroline
              • JArcher360@xxx.xxx
                Isn t Ilya more of a Russian name? Someone suggested hypnosis---I remember something about the diminutives of names in Russian ending with --ya. Slovak
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 27, 1999
                • 0 Attachment
                  Isn't Ilya more of a Russian name? Someone suggested hypnosis---I remember
                  something about the diminutives of names in Russian ending with --ya. Slovak
                  diminutives always seem to be either --ka or --om. Eastern Slovakia--why
                  not toss in a few Russian names? Makes those old records even more
                  interesting. C
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.