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Galacia, Austria

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  • ragamuffinsmom
    My great grandmother, Sophie Dragon s (maiden name), obituary states she was born in 1890 in Galacia, Austria. She came to US (Ellis Island)in 1904. Settled
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 10, 2003
      My great grandmother, Sophie Dragon's (maiden name), obituary states
      she was born in 1890 in Galacia, Austria. She came to US (Ellis
      Island)in 1904. Settled in Sayre, PA. As much as I would like to
      know something about her parents, I would also like to confirm her
      heritage and the possibility of her having Jewish roots. Thank you.
      Glenda
    • Frank
      ... From the late 1700s until the end of WW I, Poland did not exist as a country. It was divided among the Russian, German (Prussian), and Austrian Empires.
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 11, 2003
        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "ragamuffinsmom"
        <ragamuffinsmom@y...> wrote:
        > My great grandmother, Sophie Dragon's (maiden name), obituary states
        > she was born in 1890 in Galacia, Austria. She came to US (Ellis
        > Island)in 1904. Settled in Sayre, PA. As much as I would like to
        > know something about her parents, I would also like to confirm her
        > heritage and the possibility of her having Jewish roots. Thank you.

        > Glenda

        From the late 1700s until the end of WW I, Poland did not exist as a
        country. It was divided among the Russian, German (Prussian), and
        Austrian Empires. These divisions were known as Partitions.
        There was German-Poland, Russian-Poland, and Austrian-Poland.

        A Jewish surname Dragon from Zuromin, Poland which is located 218
        miles WSW of Warszawa.

        http://216.239.53.104/search?q=cache:TovrTFRN56kJ:www.jewishgen.org/jr
        i-pl/psa/zurominpsasurn.htm+Zuromin+Poland&hl=en&ie=UTF-8

        It may have been located in Western Galicia (Austrian-Poland) ?
        http://216.239.39.104/search?q=cache:7QpyWGQe0cwJ:www.rootsweb.com/~po
        lwgw/p1918.html+Duchy+of+Cieszyn&hl=en&ie=UTF-8


        Under what spelling of surname did your great GM emigrate to US
        in 1904 ?
        I don't find her name listed in Ellis Island Records (EIR)

        Frank K
      • ragamuffinsmom
        ... states ... to ... her ... you. ... Frank, Thank you for the info. This is getting fascinating for me. I have so little info but -- Her daughters say she
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 11, 2003
          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Frank" <frankur@a...> wrote:
          > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "ragamuffinsmom"
          > <ragamuffinsmom@y...> wrote:
          > > My great grandmother, Sophie Dragon's (maiden name), obituary
          states
          > > she was born in 1890 in Galacia, Austria. She came to US (Ellis
          > > Island)in 1904. Settled in Sayre, PA. As much as I would like
          to
          > > know something about her parents, I would also like to confirm
          her
          > > heritage and the possibility of her having Jewish roots. Thank
          you.
          >
          > > Glenda

          >
          >
          > Under what spelling of surname did your great GM emigrate to US
          > in 1904 ?
          > I don't find her name listed in Ellis Island Records (EIR)
          >
          > Frank K

          Frank,
          Thank you for the info. This is getting fascinating for me. I have
          so little info but --
          Her daughters say she spoke Ukranian. As far as I know, it was
          Dragon. Perhaps 1903, 1905?
        • ragamuffinsmom
          Frank, I went to those websites. Found a large family of Dragon s that had children in the 1890 s. How do I find their descendants? I want to write to
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 11, 2003
            Frank,

            I went to those websites. Found a large family of Dragon's that had
            children in the 1890's. How do I find their descendants? I want to
            write to Poland and see if anyone knows of my great grandmother?

            Just a tiny spark of interest has turned into a flame!

            Glenda

            > A Jewish surname Dragon from Zuromin, Poland which is located 218
            > miles WSW of Warszawa.
            >
            > http://216.239.53.104/search?
            q=cache:TovrTFRN56kJ:www.jewishgen.org/jr
            > i-pl/psa/zurominpsasurn.htm+Zuromin+Poland&hl=en&ie=UTF-8
            >
            > It may have been located in Western Galicia (Austrian-Poland) ?
            > http://216.239.39.104/search?
            q=cache:7QpyWGQe0cwJ:www.rootsweb.com/~po
            > lwgw/p1918.html+Duchy+of+Cieszyn&hl=en&ie=UTF-8
            >
            >
          • Frank
            ... Ruthenians, Rusnaks, Rusyns speak po nashemu ; their language is similar to Ukrainian and also uses the Cyrillic alphabet, although the Latin alphabet has
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 12, 2003
              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "ragamuffinsmom"
              <ragamuffinsmom@y...> wrote:
              > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Frank" <frankur@a...> wrote:
              > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "ragamuffinsmom"
              > > <ragamuffinsmom@y...> wrote:
              > > > My great grandmother, Sophie Dragon's (maiden name), obituary
              > states
              > > > she was born in 1890 in Galacia, Austria. She came to US (Ellis
              > > > Island)in 1904. Settled in Sayre, PA. As much as I would like
              > to
              > > > know something about her parents, I would also like to confirm
              > her
              > > > heritage and the possibility of her having Jewish roots. Thank
              > you.
              > >
              > > > Glenda
              >
              > >
              > >
              > > Under what spelling of surname did your great GM emigrate to US
              > > in 1904 ?
              > > I don't find her name listed in Ellis Island Records (EIR)
              > >
              > > Frank K
              >
              > Frank,
              > Thank you for the info. This is getting fascinating for me. I have
              > so little info but --
              > Her daughters say she spoke Ukranian. As far as I know, it was
              > Dragon. Perhaps 1903, 1905?

              Ruthenians, Rusnaks, Rusyns speak 'po nashemu'; their language is
              similar to Ukrainian and also uses the Cyrillic alphabet,
              although the Latin alphabet has been used in Slovakia.
              Usually their religion was Greek Catholic ?


              When transliterating from Cyrillic alphabet to Latin (Roman) alphabet,
              5-6 spellings are possible - all correct because there is no standard.
              Depends into which foreign language the name was translated last.

              How are you ?

              K A K /| E J| A' ? Russian (Cyrillic)
              (k ah k d ye l a)

              R K C || P A B |/| ? Ukrainian (Cyrillic)
              (yah k s p r á v ee )

              Ukrainian has a H sound/letter, but no hard G.

              Russian has no H sound/letter, but a hard G.

              Frank K
            • ragamuffinsmom
              To the following I reply. My grandmother says, Halupki (pigs in a blanket). I had a Russian friend growing up that said, Galumpki. And a Polish friend here
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 14, 2003
                To the following I reply.

                My grandmother says, Halupki (pigs in a blanket). I had a "Russian"
                friend growing up that said, Galumpki. And a Polish friend here at
                work says, Galompi. It looks to me (from the info below) that
                Halupki would be Ukranian. So, it would appear my greatgrandmother
                would NOT be Polish, but Ukranian.

                Ukrainian has a H sound/letter, but no hard G.
                >
                > Russian has no H sound/letter, but a hard G.


                Glenda

                ragamuffinsmom wrote:
                > > Her daughters say she spoke Ukranian. As far as I know, it was
                > > Dragon. Perhaps 1903, 1905?


                frankly replied:
                > Ruthenians, Rusnaks, Rusyns speak 'po nashemu'; their language is
                > similar to Ukrainian and also uses the Cyrillic alphabet,
                > although the Latin alphabet has been used in Slovakia.
                > Usually their religion was Greek Catholic ?
                >
                >
                > When transliterating from Cyrillic alphabet to Latin (Roman)
                alphabet,
                > 5-6 spellings are possible - all correct because there is no
                standard.
                > Depends into which foreign language the name was translated last.
                >
                > How are you ?
                >
                > K A K /| E J| A' ? Russian (Cyrillic)
                > (k ah k d ye l a)
                >
                > R K C || P A B |/| ? Ukrainian (Cyrillic)
                > (yah k s p r á v ee )
                >
                > Ukrainian has a H sound/letter, but no hard G.
                >
                > Russian has no H sound/letter, but a hard G.
                >
                > Frank K
              • Frank
                ... Wish we could determine a surname s ethnicity by what its name bearers ate. My GF spoke 5 languages and cooked several ethnic styles in addition to Slovak
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 15, 2003
                  --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "ragamuffinsmom"
                  <ragamuffinsmom@y...> wrote:
                  > To the following I reply.
                  >
                  > My grandmother says, Halupki (pigs in a blanket). I had a "Russian"
                  > friend growing up that said, Galumpki. And a Polish friend here at
                  > work says, Galompi. It looks to me (from the info below) that
                  > Halupki would be Ukranian. So, it would appear my greatgrandmother
                  > would NOT be Polish, but Ukranian.
                  >
                  > Ukrainian has a H sound/letter, but no hard G.
                  > >
                  > > Russian has no H sound/letter, but a hard G.

                  Wish we could determine a surname's ethnicity by what its name bearers
                  ate.
                  My GF spoke 5 languages and cooked several ethnic styles in addition
                  to Slovak and Magyar.
                  He had served as a cook in the Hungarian cavalry.

                  Halupki
                  These are a common Eastern European dish, called halupki in Slovak,
                  gol~ambki (gowompkee) in Polish, and also known as stuffed cabbage
                  rolls.
                  Ukrainian cabbage rolls are called golubtsi.
                  But that is its name transliterated to the Latin alphabet from
                  the Ukrainian Cyrillic alphabet.

                  http://pages.prodigy.net/l.hodges/translit.htm

                  Frank K
                • ragamuffinsmom
                  I remembered my grandmother used to say (phonetically), szjuck a malinka - You little devil. Can anyone determine which country/language that is? My
                  Message 8 of 8 , Aug 16, 2003
                    I remembered my grandmother used to say (phonetically), "szjuck a
                    malinka" - You little devil. Can anyone determine which
                    country/language that is? My Polish friend was puzzled by it.

                    --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Frank" <frankur@a...> wrote:
                    > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "ragamuffinsmom"
                    > <ragamuffinsmom@y...> wrote:
                    > > To the following I reply.
                    > >
                    > > My grandmother says, Halupki (pigs in a blanket). I had
                    a "Russian"
                    > > friend growing up that said, Galumpki. And a Polish friend here
                    at
                    > > work says, Galompi. It looks to me (from the info below) that
                    > > Halupki would be Ukranian. So, it would appear my
                    greatgrandmother
                    > > would NOT be Polish, but Ukranian.
                    > >
                    > > Ukrainian has a H sound/letter, but no hard G.
                    > > >
                    > > > Russian has no H sound/letter, but a hard G.
                    >
                    > Wish we could determine a surname's ethnicity by what its name
                    bearers
                    > ate.
                    > My GF spoke 5 languages and cooked several ethnic styles in
                    addition
                    > to Slovak and Magyar.
                    > He had served as a cook in the Hungarian cavalry.
                    >
                    > Halupki
                    > These are a common Eastern European dish, called halupki in Slovak,
                    > gol~ambki (gowompkee) in Polish, and also known as stuffed cabbage
                    > rolls.
                    > Ukrainian cabbage rolls are called golubtsi.
                    > But that is its name transliterated to the Latin alphabet from
                    > the Ukrainian Cyrillic alphabet.
                    >
                    > http://pages.prodigy.net/l.hodges/translit.htm
                    >
                    > Frank K
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