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Re: Church Latin

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  • J. Michutka
    ... From a book on Czechoslovak genealogy (I think), there was a mention of the husband taking the wife s family name if he(they) got the wife s family farm.
    Message 1 of 19 , Dec 9, 1999
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      At 09:37 PM 12/8/99 EST, you wrote:
      >From: JArcher360@...
      >
      >In some of these communications, there was a mention of a man's adopting a
      >surname of a woman, her maiden name, etc. I can remember some old man
      >telling me why that was so, but, I was young, and didn't think I would ever
      >really use that information. Perhaps someone else paid attention and knows
      >why that practice was in use? Caroline

      From a book on Czechoslovak genealogy (I think), there was a mention of the
      husband taking the wife's family name if he(they) got the wife's family
      farm. A variation on this seems to have happened in my own ancestry: male
      Pavlik married female Fiuri; from various records (mostly baptismal records
      for a couple of generations), it looks like this couple took on the Fiuri
      family farm/business (address was given in the records). And the family
      last name became Fiuri Pavlik, sometimes Pavlik Fiuri, for a couple of
      generations. There were TONS of Pavliks in this small town, and at least
      two other branches did a double last name; I didn't track their addresses
      to see if it was another instance of property going to the son-in-law, or
      just a way of keeping all those Pavlik families straight.

      I think there was an instance in the descendents of a Jewish rabbi where he
      had no sons, one of his sons-in-law followed in father-in-law's footsteps,
      and took his father-in-law's family name as well.

      Hope this helps.

      Julie Michutka
      jmm@...
    • RAHannig00@xxx.xxx
      Message 2 of 19 , Dec 9, 1999
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        << From a book on Czechoslovak genealogy (I think), there was a mention of the
        husband taking the wife's family name if he(they) got the wife's family
        farm. >>
        Just to add my two cents, this is probably correct; I know this was also a
        custom in Italy and perhaps it was widespread. I also know in Italy
        sometimes a wife's maiden name was added before or after the man's just
        because the man's surname was so common, it was a way to distiguish who his
        descendents were. I know that my Slovak grandmother-in-law's surname was
        Sebej Koval, and the family lore is that Sebej was added because Koval was so
        common - perhaps a Koval married a Sebej somewhere along the line.
        Robin Hannig
      • Ron Matviyak
        Yes, I have heard the same. The woman s family name would be adapted if the woman s family was much better off than the mans family; if the woman s family
        Message 3 of 19 , Dec 9, 1999
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          Yes, I have heard the same. The woman's family name would be adapted if
          the woman's family was much better off than the mans family; if the
          woman's family name was in danger of dying off; or as you say, if the
          name was too common they might modify the name adapting the womans name
          in fromt or bakc. In part of my family I belong to the Pavel Valyo's to
          seaparate us from the other Valyo's. Ironically there is only one old
          nasty man in the village with that name today!

          Ron



          J. Michutka wrote:
          >
          > From: "J. Michutka" <jmm@...>
          >
          > At 09:37 PM 12/8/99 EST, you wrote:
          > >From: JArcher360@...
          > >
          > >In some of these communications, there was a mention of a man's adopting a
          > >surname of a woman, her maiden name, etc. I can remember some old man
          > >telling me why that was so, but, I was young, and didn't think I would ever
          > >really use that information. Perhaps someone else paid attention and knows
          > >why that practice was in use? Caroline
          >
          > >From a book on Czechoslovak genealogy (I think), there was a mention of the
          > husband taking the wife's family name if he(they) got the wife's family
          > farm. A variation on this seems to have happened in my own ancestry: male
          > Pavlik married female Fiuri; from various records (mostly baptismal records
          > for a couple of generations), it looks like this couple took on the Fiuri
          > family farm/business (address was given in the records). And the family
          > last name became Fiuri Pavlik, sometimes Pavlik Fiuri, for a couple of
          > generations. There were TONS of Pavliks in this small town, and at least
          > two other branches did a double last name; I didn't track their addresses
          > to see if it was another instance of property going to the son-in-law, or
          > just a way of keeping all those Pavlik families straight.
          >
          > I think there was an instance in the descendents of a Jewish rabbi where he
          > had no sons, one of his sons-in-law followed in father-in-law's footsteps,
          > and took his father-in-law's family name as well.
          >
          > Hope this helps.
          >
          > Julie Michutka
          > jmm@...
          >
          >
        • Andrea Vangor
          It looks like I have two sisters marrying different men, of course, and in both families the surname changed to the wife s maiden name. When I finish
          Message 4 of 19 , Dec 9, 1999
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            It looks like I have two sisters marrying different men, of course, and in
            both families the surname changed to the wife's maiden name. When I finish
            researching this, I may understand more -- but there is a hint that the
            sisters' brother, whose name was written John (rightly) Doe, might have been
            adopted or otherwise not qualified for full inheritance of the parent's
            property.

            Andrea

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: <RAHannig00@...>
            To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@onelist.com>
            Sent: Thursday, December 09, 1999 4:51 AM
            Subject: Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Church Latin


            > From: RAHannig00@...
            >
            > << From a book on Czechoslovak genealogy (I think), there was a mention of
            the
            > husband taking the wife's family name if he(they) got the wife's family
            > farm. >>
            > Just to add my two cents, this is probably correct; I know this was also
            a
            > custom in Italy and perhaps it was widespread. I also know in Italy
            > sometimes a wife's maiden name was added before or after the man's just
            > because the man's surname was so common, it was a way to distiguish who
            his
            > descendents were. I know that my Slovak grandmother-in-law's surname was
            > Sebej Koval, and the family lore is that Sebej was added because Koval was
            so
            > common - perhaps a Koval married a Sebej somewhere along the line.
            > Robin Hannig
            >
            > >
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