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Re: Re: Church Latin and Surfing for Serfs

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  • Andrea Vangor
    Thanks very much, Joe. I find these medieval expressions fascinating, and sure they would have shifted their meanings over time like everything else. But I
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 7, 1999
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      Thanks very much, Joe. I find these medieval expressions fascinating, and
      sure they would have shifted their meanings over time like everything else.
      But I still want to know -- if serfdom survived in Slovakia until the
      1840's, who are the serfs? Where are the serfs? How can we tell a serf
      from a peasant in these records? A landless tenant is not necessarily a
      serf, and after the 1840's can't be a serf. Seems logical to me that a serf
      is attached to an estate, so when one shows up in the church records, it
      might mention that he or she "belongs" to someplace or other.

      No, there is no Pooville in the area, alas. I do have a Kmecz in my family
      tree though :-)
      and lots of nobility showing up at family baptisms and marriages in the
      Opina records ... probably because the local Lutheran minister for many
      years was a member of the aristocratic Csabyi family and dragged his wife
      Lady Susanna with him to these events, and probably other family members.

      Andrea


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Joe Armata <JOE@...>
      To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@onelist.com>
      Sent: Monday, December 06, 1999 11:34 AM
      Subject: Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Church Latin


      > From: "Joe Armata" <JOE@...>
      >
      > To add a bit about inquilinus, it's a term from the feudal days
      > referring to someone who had no cropland - meaning no large tracts of
      > land to grow grain. He might have a small vegetable garden near his
      > house, he might not have that and only own his house, and he might
      > not even have a house, but live in someone else's home. He was the
      > lower end of the village stratum - at the other end is the cmethonis,
      > someone with a full allotment of land (which gave us the words and
      > surnames kmet, kmiec), and one step below the cmethonis was the
      > hortulans, who had a half allotment of land. After the end of
      > feudalism the terms survived for a while longer, sometimes taking on
      > looser meanings in different places.
      >
      > I agree about iur, that it might be short for jure, meaning rightly,
      > properly, and referring to the person's legally correct last name (you
      > also see "recte" used in that meaning, to show the correct surname as
      > opposed to the local nickname). Don't know for sure though.
      >
      > Don't know about that poo word though! Is there a nearby village
      > with a name that might look like that? Maybe the person was a
      > resident of that village.
      >
      > Joe Armata
      > joe@...
      >
      > >
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