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Re: Slovak names

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  • Joe Mrnka
    Marge, I would also add that it is not unusual for Slovak surnames to include the suffix -sky . It is the masculine suffix of an adjective. While in Slovakia,
    Message 1 of 6 , May 1, 2003
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      Marge,

      I would also add that it is not unusual for Slovak surnames
      to include the suffix "-sky". It is the masculine suffix of
      an adjective. While in Slovakia, I knew a fella named
      Suc^ansky. Not far from the village I lived in was the
      villages of Horna Suc^a and Dolna Suc^a and the male
      citizen of said villages would be Suc^an.
      Using the above example I wanted to show that your ancestor
      person may have been native to Olsava. This may be a town
      or a local landmark, etc.
      In Slovak the plural is -ski (long i) as opposed to the
      short i in Polish singular.

      I hope this helps.

      Joe

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    • lkocik@comcast.net
      Bill I m not sure of how to use this forum....Can I post two surnames to see if anyone recognizes them and might possibly have information on them. I have
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 11, 2005
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        Bill
        I'm not sure of how to use this forum....Can I post two surnames to see if anyone recognizes them and might possibly have information on them. I have exhausted all free internet avenues I could find. I am not comfortable paying for a researcher, ,,,ironically, being frugal is part of my heritage.
        Larry Kocik
        the names are; Kocik/Kocich and Gajdusek. The villiage of origin is Gbely, formerly Egbel.
        thank you very much -------------- Original message --------------
        Thank you very much. This will help the research tremendously, as it adds
        some opinion and position to the matter of discussion.

        ______________
        Bill Tarkulich



        -----Original Message-----
        From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Dr. Joe Q
        Sent: Monday, October 10, 2005 5:53 PM
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [S-R] Brief Magyar (Hungary) Translation

        Dear Bill,

        I didn't know you wanted the whole thing, here it is:

        The abora is a building to store hay and grain that
        has a movable roof supported on four poles. The people
        adjusted the roof up and down depending upon the
        quantity of stored hay. The roof was usually
        pyramidal in shape but there were also a saddle shaped
        roofs. It [the roof] was covered with wooden shingles,
        sticks, or thatches. The roof of the abora (also
        called a cap) is held in place with pins placed in the
        holes of the upright poles. The pins were made of hard
        wood or iron. The abora rarely had walls. It was a
        characteristic building in Zempl�n, Ung, Bereg,
        Ugocsa, M�ramaros, and Szatm�r counties and was used
        by Hungarian and Ukrainian peasants. It was used by
        Romanians in M�ramaros county and in Slovak S�ros
        county. With few exceptions, it was unknown in other
        areas of the Carpathian basin.

        sz�na �s kev�s gabona t�rol�s�ra szolg�l� �p�tm�ny,
        amelynek n�gy tart�oszlopon nyugv�, mozgathat� fedele
        van. A teto"t az abor�ban t�rolt term�ny, takarm�ny
        mennyis�g�to"l f�gg�o"en szokt�k feljebb emelni vagy
        lejjebb cs�sztatni. A teto" legt�bbsz�r piramis,
        ritk�bban nyereg form�j�; fazsindellyel, - dr�nic�val
        vagy zs�ppal fedett. Az abora fedele (neve: sisak,
        sapka) a tart�oszlopokba szab�lyos k�z�nk�nt f�rt
        lyukakba illesztett kem�nyfa vagy vascsapokon
        nyugszik. Az abor�nak ritk�n van fala. A t�rt�neti
        Zempl�n, Ung, Bereg, Ugocsa, M�ramaros �s Szatm�r m.
        magyar �s ukr�n paraszts�g�nak jellegzetes �p�tm�nye.
        Haszn�lj�k a m�ramarosi rom�nok �s a s�rosi szlov�kok
        is. A K�rp�t-medence egy�b t�jain � n�h�ny sz�rv�nyos
        megjelen�s�t lesz�m�tva � az abora ismeretlen.

        ---------------------------------

        There is an illustration of it in a 14 century Czech
        bible, in the 15 century there is a drawing of one in
        [unspecified] English writing. In the new ages [after
        the Middle Ages] it was known to be used in Holland,
        Germany, Baltics, Poland, and Belarus. It seems
        certain, that the hayracks spread from Western Europe
        eastward in the middle ages. It was found in
        northeastern Hungary in the 16-17 century at the edges
        of the great Hungarian plain.

        Az abor�t a cseh Veliszl�v-biblia rajzol�ja a 14.
        sz.-ban meg�r�k�tette, de megtal�lhat� 15. sz.-i angol
        k�pes �br�zol�sokon is. Az �jkorban ismeretes volt
        holland, n�met, balti, lengyel �s belorusz ter�leteken
        is. Bizony�tottnak l�tszik, hogy az abora Ny-Eur�p�b�l
        a k�z�pkorban terjedt kelet fel�. Az abora a 14. sz.
        elej�n egy bodrogk�zi falu nevek�nt m�r ismert volt. A
        16�17. sz.-t�l adatolhat� az abora haszn�lata az �K-i
        K�rp�tokban s az Alf�ld �rintkezo" perem�n.

        ---------------------------------

        In the same area, it could be found on farms of large
        land owners. In the 19th century, Hungarian economic
        writers promoted the use of abora, but it was to no
        avail. It is also spelled abara.

        E ter�let nagy uradalmaiban is megtal�lhat� volt. A
        19. sz.-i magyar gazdas�gi �r�k eredm�nytelen�l
        propag�lt�k haszn�lat�t. Abara n�ven is ismerik.


        ---------------------------------

        Literature citations [do you need these translated
        too?]

        � Irod. Kwasn'iewski, Krist�f: Etnografia Polska
        (1965); Schier, Bruno: Hauslandschaften und
        Kulturbewegungen im �stlichen Mitteleuropa (G�ttingen,
        1966); Pal�di-Kov�cs Attila: Az abara. Egy sz�nat�rol�
        �p�tm�ny a magyar parasztok gazd�lkod�s�ban (N�pi
        Kult�ra � N�pi T�rsadalom, 1969)


        --- Bill Tarkulich <bill.tarkulich@...> wrote:

        > Thank you Doc. It adds some supporting framework to
        > the when and where.
        > Hopefully this information will open some doors.
        >
        > While we are speaking of Hungary, I want to
        > emphasize to the group how
        > important and relevant documents, books, essays and
        > histories of Hungary are
        > to us Slovakia researchers. There is much that can
        > be gained from reading
        > these documents, in large part because there was so
        > little written about our
        > region in particular. It was just lumped into the
        > larger works.
        >
        > In my early research, I largely ignored Hungarian
        > works, and boy that was a
        > mistake. While what is written may be small and
        > selective, it is important
        > nonetheless. Janet's reference to "Hungarian
        > Ethnography and Folklore",
        > translated into English and posted online is a
        > treasure. For certain there
        > are many other very valuable Magyar-language
        > documents that will hopefully
        > be translated someday, or perhaps we will learn to
        > read Magyar too!
        >
        > ______________
        > Bill Tarkulich
        >
        >
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
        > Behalf Of Dr. Joe Q
        > Sent: Wednesday, September 28, 2005 11:20 AM
        > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: RE: [S-R] Brief Magyar (Hungary)
        > Translation
        >
        > Dear Bill,
        >
        > Below is the article in the link. As was previously
        > pointed out, the sentence "Bizony�tottnak l�tszik,
        > hogy az abora Ny-Eur�p�b�l a k�z�pkorban terjedt
        > kelet
        > fel�." tells a lot. I have added the translation of
        > the other important sentences in that section which
        > I
        > have set off with dashes.
        >
        > Dr. "Q"
        >
        > ***************************
        >
        > sz�na �s kev�s gabona t�rol�s�ra szolg�l� �p�tm�ny,
        > amelynek n�gy tart�oszlopon nyugv�, mozgathat�
        > fedele
        > van. A teto"t az abor�ban t�rolt term�ny, takarm�ny
        > mennyis�g�to"l f�ggo"en szokt�k feljebb emelni vagy
        > lejjebb cs�sztatni. A teto" legt�bbsz�r piramis,
        > ritk�bban nyereg form�j�; fazsindellyel, ?
        > dr�nic�val
        > vagy zs�ppal fedett. Az abora fedele (neve: sisak,
        > sapka) a tart�oszlopokba szab�lyos k�z�nk�nt f�rt
        > lyukakba illesztett kem�nyfa vagy vascsapokon
        > nyugszik. Az abor�nak ritk�n van fala. A t�rt�neti
        > Zempl�n, Ung, Bereg, Ugocsa, M�ramaros �s Szatm�r m.
        > magyar �s ukr�n paraszts�g�nak jellegzetes
        > �p�tm�nye.
        > Haszn�lj�k a m�ramarosi rom�nok �s a s�rosi
        > szlov�kok
        > is. A K�rp�t-medence egy�b t�jain � n�h�ny
        > sz�rv�nyos
        > megjelen�s�t lesz�m�tva � az abora ismeretlen.
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        >
        > Az abor�t a cseh Veliszl�v-biblia rajzol�ja a 14.
        > sz.-ban meg�r�k�tette, de megtal�lhat� 15. sz.-i
        > angol
        > k�pes �br�zol�sokon is. Az �jkorban ismeretes volt
        > holland, n�met, balti, lengyel �s belorusz
        > ter�leteken
        > is. Bizony�tottnak l�tszik, hogy az abora
        > Ny-Eur�p�b�l
        > a k�z�pkorban terjedt kelet fel�. Az abora a 14. sz.
        > elej�n egy bodrogk�zi falu nevek�nt m�r ismert volt.
        > A
        > 16�17. sz.-t�l adatolhat� az abora haszn�lata az
        > �K-i
        > K�rp�tokban s az Alf�ld �rintkezo" perem�n.
        >
        > There is an illustration of it in a 14 century Czech
        > bible, in the 15 century there is a drawing of one
        > in
        > (unspecified) English writing. In a Czech bible from
        > the 14 century there is a picutIn the new ages
        > (after
        > the middle ages) it was known to be used in Holland,
        > Germany, Baltics, Poland, and Belorus. It seems
        > certain, that the hayracks spread from Western
        > Europe
        > eastward in the middle ages. It was found in
        > northeastern Hungary in the 16-17 century.
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        >
        > E ter�let nagy uradalmaiban is megtal�lhat� volt. A
        > 19. sz.-i magyar gazdas�gi �r�k eredm�nytelen�l
        > propag�lt�k haszn�lat�t. Abara n�ven is ismerik. �
        > Irod. Kwasn'iewski, Krist�f: Etnografia Polska
        > (1965);
        > Schier, Bruno: Hauslandschaften und Kulturbewegungen
        > im �stlichen Mitteleuropa (G�ttingen, 1966);
        > Pal�di-Kov�cs Attila: Az abara. Egy sz�nat�rol�
        > �p�tm�ny a magyar parasztok gazd�lkod�s�ban (N�pi
        > Kult�ra � N�pi T�rsadalom, 1969)
        >
        >
        >
        > --- Bill Tarkulich <bill.tarkulich@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Thank you very much John. This lends some support
        > > to the side of the
        > > argument that Hay Racks were originally a Dutch
        > > invention.
        > >
        > > ______________
        > > Bill Tarkulich
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > -----Original Message-----
        > > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        > > [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
        > > Behalf Of John Venham
        > > Sent: Wednesday, September 28, 2005 5:59 AM
        > > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        > > Subject: Re: [S-R] Brief Magyar (Hungary)
        > > Translation
        > >
        > > Bill,
        > >
        > > The key sentence to answer your question:
        > >
        > > Bizony�tottnak l�tszik, hogy az abora Ny-Eur�p�b�l
        > a
        > > k�z�pkorban terjedt kelet fel�.
        > >
        > >
        > > It seems certain, that the hayracks spread from
        > > Western Europe eastward in the middle ages.
        > >
        > > John Venham
        > >
        > > --- Bill Tarkulich <bill.tarkulich@...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > > Brief Magyar (Hungary) Translation
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Anyone care to take a stab at this page?
        > > >
        > > > http://mek.oszk.hu/02100/02115/html/1-18.html
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > It's written in Magyar. It's about the hay
        > > > racks/obhory/abora. What I
        > > > really want to know is does the text indicate
        > > where
        > > > the racks originated?
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Thanks!
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > ______________
        > > > Bill Tarkulich
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        ______________________________________________________
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      • Tom Geiss
        I have a Question about two Slovak names,. One person is LUBOMIR, and another is L UBOMIR? Also some other Slovak words , like L UDI ? Is there a reason for
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 31 7:16 PM
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          I have a Question about two Slovak names,. One person is LUBOMIR, and another is L'UBOMIR? Also some other Slovak words , like L'UDI ?
          Is there a reason for this? Tom

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • n8de@thepoint.net
          The accented L is pronounced LY ... both are the same name, just one in Slovak, the other in Latin or Hungarian. Don Havlicek Edmore, MI
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 31 8:14 PM
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            The 'accented' L is pronounced LY ... both are the same name, just one
            in Slovak, the other in Latin or Hungarian.

            Don Havlicek
            Edmore, MI


            Quoting Tom Geiss <tomfgurka@...>:

            > I have a Question about two Slovak names,. One person is LUBOMIR,
            > and another is L'UBOMIR? Also some other Slovak words , like L'UDI ?
            > Is there a reason for this? Tom
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
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