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Re: Maczko, Orendas/Arendacs

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  • Frank
    Slovak language doesn t have a letter cz . Cz was an archaic Hungarian letter combination, now the letter c. In Slovak and Hungarian the letter c is pron. as
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 29, 2003
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      Slovak language doesn't have a letter 'cz'.
      Cz was an archaic Hungarian letter combination, now the letter c.
      In Slovak and Hungarian the letter c is pron. as English 'ts'.

      In Hungarian, letter 'cs' is pron. ch.
      Slavic diacritic letter 'c^' is pron. ch.
      Archaic Hungarian letters 'ch, ts' are now modern letter cs and letter
      'th' is modern letter t.

      Ellis Island Records (NYC) 1892-1912 list :
      482 surnames Maczko
      63 surnames spelled as Macsko
      32 surnames Orendas
      5 surnames spelled as Arendacs
      5 surnames Orendac from Kajtovka, Hungary
      5 surnames Arendac from Hajtovka, Czechoslovakia

      In 1900, a Maria Arendacs, age 16 (b. about 1884) and a
      Zuzanna Arendacs, age 16, emigrated from Hanjuvko, Hungary.
      They went to Passaic, NJ.
      Maria to her cousin and Zuzanna to her sister.

      Hajtóka (H) was formerly located in Sáros megye (county), Hungary
      near Héthárs (H) Lipany (Sk) and in the Epérjes (H) Pres^ov (Sk)
      area.
      It was also called Hajtufka, Hajtuvka, and Hajtovka (Sk) in the past.

      The LDS-Mormons have filmed the G.C. parish church records (1827-1933)
      for Hajtovka.
      Listed under U'dol, Sloavkia.
      Text in Latin, Hungarian, and Church Slavonic.

      film #
      1794352
      1794353


      The LDS-Mormons have filmed the R.C. parish church records (1686-1924)
      for Hajtovka.
      Listed under Plavnica, Slovakia.
      Text in Latin and Hungarian.

      film #
      1793215-1793218

      You live in NH ?
      There may not be many LDS FHCs located there.
    • Nick Holcz
      ... That interests me as my family name is Holcz and my father was born in Nove Mesto NV, can I assume from your information that it is a Hungarian name?
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 29, 2003
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        At 06:40 PM 29/04/2003 +0000, you wrote:
        >Slovak language doesn't have a letter 'cz'.
        >Cz was an archaic Hungarian letter combination, now the letter c.
        >In Slovak and Hungarian the letter c is pron. as English 'ts'.
        That interests me as my family name is Holcz and my father was born in Nove
        Mesto NV, can I assume from your information that it is a Hungarian name?
      • Alyssa Eppich
        Hi Frank, Thanks for the information on the Ellis Island records and various spellings of Maczko. In my ggps case, though, both came over in the 1880s making
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 30, 2003
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          Hi Frank,
          Thanks for the information on the Ellis Island records and various spellings
          of Maczko. In my ggps case, though, both came over in the 1880s making the
          search even more interesting! I am having to look at ship's manifests. I
          found one with a Janos Macko, age 38, whom I believe could be my gggf,
          coming in 1888, supposedly one year before the rest of the family, including
          my ggf, came.

          Actually, there is an LDS center in Exeter New Hampshire which is not too
          far from where I live.
          Mary Orendas/Arendacs' family came in 1886, but I have not had much luck
          tracking the ship's manifests for them. Like the Maczkos, my best hopes are
          the LDS films. Thanks for your help-I'm always interested in the information
          that you have-
          Alyssa
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Frank" <frankur@...>
          To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, April 29, 2003 2:40 PM
          Subject: [S-R] Re: Maczko, Orendas/Arendacs


          Slovak language doesn't have a letter 'cz'.
          Cz was an archaic Hungarian letter combination, now the letter c.
          In Slovak and Hungarian the letter c is pron. as English 'ts'.

          In Hungarian, letter 'cs' is pron. ch.
          Slavic diacritic letter 'c^' is pron. ch.
          Archaic Hungarian letters 'ch, ts' are now modern letter cs and letter
          'th' is modern letter t.

          Ellis Island Records (NYC) 1892-1912 list :
          482 surnames Maczko
          63 surnames spelled as Macsko
          32 surnames Orendas
          5 surnames spelled as Arendacs
          5 surnames Orendac from Kajtovka, Hungary
          5 surnames Arendac from Hajtovka, Czechoslovakia

          In 1900, a Maria Arendacs, age 16 (b. about 1884) and a
          Zuzanna Arendacs, age 16, emigrated from Hanjuvko, Hungary.
          They went to Passaic, NJ.
          Maria to her cousin and Zuzanna to her sister.

          Hajtóka (H) was formerly located in Sáros megye (county), Hungary
          near Héthárs (H) Lipany (Sk) and in the Epérjes (H) Pres^ov (Sk)
          area.
          It was also called Hajtufka, Hajtuvka, and Hajtovka (Sk) in the past.

          The LDS-Mormons have filmed the G.C. parish church records (1827-1933)
          for Hajtovka.
          Listed under U'dol, Sloavkia.
          Text in Latin, Hungarian, and Church Slavonic.

          film #
          1794352
          1794353


          The LDS-Mormons have filmed the R.C. parish church records (1686-1924)
          for Hajtovka.
          Listed under Plavnica, Slovakia.
          Text in Latin and Hungarian.

          film #
          1793215-1793218

          You live in NH ?
          There may not be many LDS FHCs located there.



          To unsubscribe from this group, go to
          http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
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        • Vladimir Bohinc
          Dear Nick, Holcz is a hungarian spelling of a german name. Although the correct german spelling would have been Holz (= wood), but the actual pronunciation is
          Message 4 of 6 , May 1 9:30 AM
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            Dear Nick,
            Holcz is a hungarian spelling of a german name. Although the correct german
            spelling would have been Holz (= wood),
            but the actual pronunciation is what requires the cz spelling, is hungarian
            language is used.
            The other day I went through the Nove Mesto 1869 census. Almost 3/4 of the
            houses were Jewish! Nove Mesto was a Jewish town. Now, just a few a left.
            Tere were also some Germans here.
            Regards,
            Vladimir

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Nick Holcz" <nickh@...>
            To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2003 4:15 AM
            Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: Maczko, Orendas/Arendacs


            > At 06:40 PM 29/04/2003 +0000, you wrote:
            > >Slovak language doesn't have a letter 'cz'.
            > >Cz was an archaic Hungarian letter combination, now the letter c.
            > >In Slovak and Hungarian the letter c is pron. as English 'ts'.
            > That interests me as my family name is Holcz and my father was born in
            Nove
            > Mesto NV, can I assume from your information that it is a Hungarian name?
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
            http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
            SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
          • Nick Holcz
            ... Vladimir, thanks for the information, On my father s birth certificate his name is spelt HOLZ on other papers I have it is spelt HOLCZ ,my family ( Slovak
            Message 5 of 6 , May 1 8:45 PM
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              At 06:30 PM 1/05/2003 +0200, you wrote:
              >Dear Nick,
              >Holcz is a hungarian spelling of a german name. Although the correct german
              >spelling would have been Holz (= wood),
              >but the actual pronunciation is what requires the cz spelling, is hungarian
              >language is used.
              >The other day I went through the Nove Mesto 1869 census. Almost 3/4 of the
              >houses were Jewish! Nove Mesto was a Jewish town. Now, just a few a left.
              >Tere were also some Germans here.
              >Regards,
              >Vladimir

              Vladimir, thanks for the information, On my father's birth certificate his
              name is spelt HOLZ on other papers I have it is spelt HOLCZ ,my family (
              Slovak part) was Jewish and my grandfather Samuel was born in 1865 and he
              married Hermina Lowy born 1868 ( the dates I worked out from information on
              birth certificate) . I have no idea where grandparents come from.

              Regards
              Nick
            • John M,
              ... There are also 22 Maezko. I couldn t find my father s (Maczko) manifest entry until I tried Maezko on the chance the c was mistaken for an e in the
              Message 6 of 6 , May 2 11:12 PM
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                At 07:12 PM 4/30/2003 -0400, you wrote:
                >Ellis Island Records (NYC) 1892-1912 list :
                >482 surnames Maczko
                > 63 surnames spelled as Macsko

                There are also 22 Maezko. I couldn't find my father's (Maczko) manifest
                entry until I tried Maezko on the chance the "c" was mistaken for an "e" in
                the EIDB listings. It was.

                John M.
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