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Slovaks in Galicia?

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  • Andrea Vangor
    Does anyone know if there were Slovaks living in the area of SE Poland called Galicia? I have a lead on someone who may be an ancestor. Charles
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 14, 1999
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      Does anyone know if there were Slovaks living in the area of SE Poland
      called Galicia? I have a lead on someone who may be an ancestor. Charles
      TREMBATH/TRIMBATH = Karol TREMBITZ, born around 1890 and married in
      Pennsylvania in 1917, claimed that his village of origin was "Beretski" and
      that his native language was Slovak. He seems to have been originally
      Byzantine Catholic.

      His father, who was killed in a bar fight in Pennsylvania, was Frank
      Trembath born c. 1870 and his mother was Anna MEDLECK aka Anna
      VAINGAR/VAINGER born c. 1877. Presumably, these parents were born in
      "Beretski" and their son claimed that their native language was also Slovak.

      The family story goes that after the parents had emigrated to America and
      the husband was killed in the fight, Anna took her son Charles back to the
      old country, wherever that was in Austria-Hungary (including Galicia). She
      later sent her son back to America. His descendants want to know where he
      came from, and I want to know if there is any connection between the surname
      Vaingar and my own, Vangor.

      There is no village called Beretski in Slovakia or anywhere in the former
      Austro-Hungarian territory, but there were two Rusyn villages named Berezki,
      one not far from the border of Slovakia.

      So, here are the questions.

      1. Would a Rusyn from Galicia report that his native tongue and that of his
      parents was Slovak? (On the 1920 U.S. census).

      2. Were there Slovaks living in Galicia, and would they have lived in a
      Rusyn village while maintaining their Slovak identity?

      3. Has anyone come across these surnames near the Polish border,
      VAINGER/AR, MEDLECK, TRIMBATH/TREMBATH/TREMBITZ?

      None of them sound particularly Slovak to me, but what do I know.

      Thanks for any useful ideas.

      Andrea
    • MJESKO@xxxxx.xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx)
      Hi Andrea Yes, there are many Greek Catholic Slovaks in S.E.Poland..... Well, there used to be until the end of WWII when their villages were burned and they
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 14, 1999
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        Hi Andrea

        Yes, there are many Greek Catholic Slovaks in S.E.Poland.....

        Well, there used to be until the end of WWII when their villages were
        burned and they were massacred and/or deported to Ukraine by the Polish
        government.

        This portion of Poland and the area called ZAKOPANE were orginally part
        of Slovakia but were "given" to Poland in 1919-1920 in order to stop a
        war.

        Check out the Carpatho-Ruszyn web site to get more info.

        Mark

        "TRADITION is the JOYFUL memory of a people!"
      • Andrea Vangor
        Thanks, Mark, I will. I am hoping that these people came instead from a village west of Kos~ice in Gemer, called Beretke -- they will be ever so much easier
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 14, 1999
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          Thanks, Mark, I will. I am hoping that these people came instead from a
          village west of Kos~ice in Gemer, called Beretke -- they will be ever so
          much easier to find. I can't imagine that many records survived the
          devastation you describe.

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: mark JESKO <MJESKO@...>
          To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@onelist.com>
          Sent: Sunday, November 14, 1999 4:46 AM
          Subject: Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Slovaks in Galicia?


          > From: MJESKO@... (mark JESKO)
          >
          > Hi Andrea
          >
          > Yes, there are many Greek Catholic Slovaks in S.E.Poland.....
          >
          > Well, there used to be until the end of WWII when their villages were
          > burned and they were massacred and/or deported to Ukraine by the Polish
          > government.
          >
          > This portion of Poland and the area called ZAKOPANE were orginally part
          > of Slovakia but were "given" to Poland in 1919-1920 in order to stop a
          > war.
          >
          > Check out the Carpatho-Ruszyn web site to get more info.
          >
          > Mark
          >
          > "TRADITION is the JOYFUL memory of a people!"
          >
          > >
        • Joe Armata
          Just to clarify this a bit, there were no ethnic Slovak villages in Galicia, though there were Slovak individuals scattered around Galicia who immigrated there
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 15, 1999
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            Just to clarify this a bit, there were no ethnic Slovak villages in
            Galicia, though there were Slovak individuals scattered around
            Galicia who immigrated there for marriage or business or other
            reasons. On the other hand, there were ethnic Polish villages in
            Hungary/Slovakia. This was partially due to the gradual shift of the
            Polish/Hungarian border northwards by Hungary during the early middle
            ages (it used to be around the Hornad river, then moved up to the
            Poprad), partially by Poles fleeing oppressive feudal conditions or
            just seeking a better life in more prosperous Hungary, and partially
            by the Wallachian migrations.

            The northern tips of Orava and Spis counties (roughly a dozen
            villages each) were ceded to Poland following the breakup of the
            Austro-Hungarian empire after WW1, when Poland was recreated as a
            nation. Though they're now part of Poland, they were never part of
            Galicia. At the time, Poland wanted larger chunks of Orava and Spis
            counties, based on the Polish-majority populations there, while
            Slovakia naturally wanted to maintain its title to all the land.
            Village representatives went both ways on the issue, and there was
            talk of a plebescite, but in the end a council of ambassadors decided
            to give Poland small slices of each county. A couple more villages
            were ceded to Poland just before WW2 broke out, but after the war
            they reverted to Slovakia again.

            Zakopane wasn't part of that land transfer, as it was always part of
            Galicia (and Poland before that).

            The populations that were expelled from southeast Poland after WW2
            were Rusyns/Ukrainians, not Slovaks.


            Joe Armata
            joe@...
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