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Re: Seen this name before?

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  • Frank <frankur@att.net>
    ... Czechoslovakian ... What was your great GF s first name ? His naturalization papers should have listed his birthplace (village/town) He emigrated to the
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 28, 2003
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      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "andy655321 <achema@m...>"
      <achema@m...> wrote:
      > Hello, My name is Andrew Chema. My great grandfather's
      > naturalization papers say his former nationality was
      Czechoslovakian
      > and I was wondering if this is really a czech, slovak name or maybe
      > one that has been changed a little.. if so, what does it mean or
      > translate to ?? Thanks!


      What was your great GF's first name ?
      His naturalization papers should have listed his birthplace
      (village/town)
      He emigrated to the U.S. in what year (from naturalization papers)

      Where did he settle in the U.S.

      U.S. Social Security Death Index (SSDI) lists 49 surnames Chema.
      Under NY, PA, OH and mainly MI.
      Are any of these surnames related ?

      His nationality was Czechoslovak after 1920.
      But, as you wrote what was his ethnicity ?
      Slovak, Czech, Hungarian, Austrian, other ?

      How are you ? English

      Wie geht es Ihnen ? Austrian

      Hogy Van ? Hungarian

      Ako sa más^ ? Slovak

      Jak se máte ? Czech

      Jak sie masz ? Polish
    • andy655321 <achema@muskingum.edu>
      His first name was Paul; His wife s name was Rose Valinsky before they were married. He came to the United States (New York) between 1900 and 1905 (sorry I
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 28, 2003
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        His first name was Paul; His wife's name was Rose Valinsky before
        they were married. He came to the United States (New York) between
        1900 and 1905 (sorry I dont have the paper on hand at the moment).
        He settled in Ohio between those same years. Thanks again.
      • andy655321 <achema@muskingum.edu>
        I should say that the name was changed briefly ( A year or so) to Crema then back to Chema. Any reason for this you imagine ???
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 28, 2003
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          I should say that the name was changed briefly ( A year or so) to
          Crema then back to Chema. Any reason for this you imagine ???
        • Frank <frankur@att.net>
          ... I don t know. Some emigrants changed names after they settled in the U.S. In a ship manifest it could have been just a misspelling. Crema is an Italian
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 29, 2003
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            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "andy655321 <achema@m...>"
            <achema@m...> wrote:
            > I should say that the name was changed briefly ( A year or so) to
            > Crema then back to Chema. Any reason for this you imagine ???

            I don't know.
            Some emigrants changed names after they settled in the U.S.
            In a ship manifest it could have been just a misspelling.

            Crema is an Italian word meaning 'cream' and an Italian surname.

            When a Slavic surname ends in a vowel it usually gets put
            into listings with Romance languages names, Italian, Spanish etc.
            Sometimes you can tell by the surname bearer's first name.

            In Czech and Slovak the diacritic (accented) letter c^ is pron. ch.
            Slovak also has a letter 'Ch' pron. ch which comes after h in
            the Slovak dictionary.
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