Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [S-R] Re: GALOVICH

Expand Messages
  • Pat Galovich
    Many thanks, Frank, for your very informative email. Two of the Galovich surnames listed in the Poprad and Bratislava regions belong to my husband s
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 29, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Many thanks, Frank, for your very informative email. Two of the Galovich surnames listed in the Poprad and Bratislava regions belong to my husband's
      half-brother and half nephew. We have been in touch with both, but the last contact was early 2000. We are planning a visit next September so hopefully
      will be able to gather more family history. I have determined that my father in law arrived in Quebec in 1929 aboard the SS Empress of Scotland, and 'rode
      the rails' to B.C. where he resided until his death in 1989.

      Of the 5 surname Galovichs in B.C., 4 belong to my immediate family - the 5th one is not familiar, and I thank you for bringing him to my attention.
      Perhaps I will attempt to get in touch and see if there is a connection.

      Much appreciated.
      Pat, Mission, B.C.
      _________

      > > Hi Terry: My father in law, Juraj Matej Galovic was born in
      > Hranovnica in 1900, s/o Jozef Galovic and Maria Benkova. To the best
      > of my knowledge, the family have never used the spelling you refer to and none from my husband's direct line emigrated to the States. However, I will
      > keep
      > you email on file for future reference.
      > > Many thanks for your interest.
      > > Regards,
      > > Pat, Mission, B.C.
      > > Surname Interests: Galovic/Galovich, Benko/Benkova, Hudzik, Gajan,
      > Kolba

      _______________________

      > ahoj Pat,
      > Not my line, however ..
      > Hungarians had a surname ending -ics which was not native to
      > Hungarian but a phonetic adaptation i.e. written -ics pron. ick.
      > This was akin to South Slavic surname affix -ic'/-vic', -ovic' pron.
      > ovich, meaning 'son of'.
      > Similar to Polish surname affix -owicz or -owycz, which is
      > pronounced the same as and means the same thing as 'son of' (clan
      > name) in Croatian.
      > This special ending also has the same meaning in Russian
      > (-vitch)
      >
      > Magyar letter 'cs' (ch)
      > Slovak diacritic letter c^ (ch)
      > Croatian diacritic letter c' (ch)
      > Polish letter 'cz' (ch)
      >
      > Now 170 surnames Galovic(h) emigrated to the U.S.
      > The majority were from former Yugoslavia (Croatia)
      > I have the same problem with my own paternal surname,
      > which is found in both Croatia and Slovakia.
      > There are historical reasons for this.
      >
      > Only 7 or so surnames Galgovic/Galgovics emigrated to the U.S.
      > The only one I identified emigrated from western Slovakia (Horná
      > Krupá)
      >
      > Hranovnica (Sk) Szepesvéghely (H) is located in the Poprad region in
      > eastern Slovakia.
      > Szepes + vég + hely means 'beautiful end place' in Magyar.
      > The LDS-Mormons filmed the R.C. parish church records (1820-1905)
      > for Hranovnica, Slovakia.
      >
      > The Slovakia telephone directory lists 5 surnames Galovic^
      > (Galovich) under Poprad and 20 surnames Galovic^(Galovich) under
      > Bratislava.
      >
      > Canada telephone White Pages list :
      > 7 surnames Galovic (Canada) and 5 surnames Galovich (BC)
      > v
      > Frank Kurcina
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Frank
      ... Galovich surnames listed in the Poprad and Bratislava regions belong to my husband s ... the last contact was early 2000. We are planning a visit next
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 29, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., Pat Galovich <bill-pat_galovich@t...> wrote:
        > Many thanks, Frank, for your very informative email. Two of the
        Galovich surnames listed in the Poprad and Bratislava regions belong
        to my husband's
        > half-brother and half nephew. We have been in touch with both, but
        the last contact was early 2000. We are planning a visit next
        September so hopefully
        > will be able to gather more family history. I have determined that
        my father in law arrived in Quebec in 1929 aboard the SS Empress of
        Scotland, and 'rode
        > the rails' to B.C. where he resided until his death in 1989.
        >
        > Of the 5 surname Galovichs in B.C., 4 belong to my immediate family
        - the 5th one is not familiar, and I thank you for bringing him to my
        attention.
        > Perhaps I will attempt to get in touch and see if there is a
        connection.
        >
        > Much appreciated.
        > Pat, Mission, B.C.

        Since there were so few surnames Galgovics listed in the Ellis
        Island Records I looked at the records.

        In 1900 there emigrated to the U.S. 5 surnames Galgovics.
        Mother Maria and her 4 children.
        They were from Kozma, Hungary which is now Kuzmice, Slovkaia and
        located in the Trebis^ov region.
        They went to address of her husband Josef in Franklin Furnace
        (Of which there are a number of place names located in the U.S.)

        The Slovakia telephone directory lists a Jozef Galgovic^ under
        Trebis^ov.

        In 1911 Mary Galgovic Mazuta, age 23, emigrated to the U.S. with a
        Anna , age 4 years.
        Mary was a widow, so Mazuta was her married name.
        She was going to address of her father Jozsef Galgovics in East
        Stroudsburg, PA.
        Jozsef was Anna's grandfather.
        Jozsef had lived in Franklin Furnace in 1899/1905.

        Would seem that Galgovic is a Slovak surname, spelled both
        Galgovics in Magyar and Galgovic^ (mäkc^en^ c )

        Surname is also found in western and eastern Slovakia as is Galovic^.

        Happy hunting !

        Frank K












        > _________
        >
        > > > Hi Terry: My father in law, Juraj Matej Galovic was born in
        > > Hranovnica in 1900, s/o Jozef Galovic and Maria Benkova. To the
        best
        > > of my knowledge, the family have never used the spelling you refer
        to and none from my husband's direct line emigrated to the States.
        However, I will
        > > keep
        > > you email on file for future reference.
        > > > Many thanks for your interest.
        > > > Regards,
        > > > Pat, Mission, B.C.
        > > > Surname Interests: Galovic/Galovich, Benko/Benkova, Hudzik,
        Gajan,
        > > Kolba
        >
        > _______________________
        >
        > > ahoj Pat,
        > > Not my line, however ..
        > > Hungarians had a surname ending -ics which was not native to
        > > Hungarian but a phonetic adaptation i.e. written -ics pron. ick.
        > > This was akin to South Slavic surname affix -ic'/-vic', -ovic'
        pron.
        > > ovich, meaning 'son of'.
        > > Similar to Polish surname affix -owicz or -owycz, which is
        > > pronounced the same as and means the same thing as 'son of' (clan
        > > name) in Croatian.
        > > This special ending also has the same meaning in Russian
        > > (-vitch)
        > >
        > > Magyar letter 'cs' (ch)
        > > Slovak diacritic letter c^ (ch)
        > > Croatian diacritic letter c' (ch)
        > > Polish letter 'cz' (ch)
        > >
        > > Now 170 surnames Galovic(h) emigrated to the U.S.
        > > The majority were from former Yugoslavia (Croatia)
        > > I have the same problem with my own paternal surname,
        > > which is found in both Croatia and Slovakia.
        > > There are historical reasons for this.
        > >
        > > Only 7 or so surnames Galgovic/Galgovics emigrated to the U.S.
        > > The only one I identified emigrated from western Slovakia (Horná
        > > Krupá)
        > >
        > > Hranovnica (Sk) Szepesvéghely (H) is located in the Poprad region
        in
        > > eastern Slovakia.
        > > Szepes + vég + hely means 'beautiful end place' in Magyar.
        > > The LDS-Mormons filmed the R.C. parish church records (1820-1905)
        > > for Hranovnica, Slovakia.
        > >
        > > The Slovakia telephone directory lists 5 surnames Galovic^
        > > (Galovich) under Poprad and 20 surnames Galovic^(Galovich) under
        > > Bratislava.
        > >
        > > Canada telephone White Pages list :
        > > 7 surnames Galovic (Canada) and 5 surnames Galovich (BC)
        > > v
        > > Frank Kurcina
        > >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Pat Galovich
        More great info - thanks once again Frank for your efforts. Good to have this type of thing in my files as I have so little knowledge of Eastern Europe and
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 29, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          More great info - thanks once again Frank for your efforts. Good to have this type of thing in my files as I have so little knowledge of Eastern Europe
          and particularly the history and culture of Slovakia, and surrounding areas (much to my chagrin). I'm sure the particulars you have provided will be of
          help in the future. Much appreciated.
          Regards,
          Pat, Mission, B.C.
          _________________

          > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., Pat Galovich <bill-pat_galovich@t...> wrote:
          > > Many thanks, Frank, for your very informative email. Two of the
          > Galovich surnames listed in the Poprad and Bratislava regions belong
          > to my husband's half-brother and half nephew. We have been in touch with both, but the last contact was early 2000. We are planning a visit next
          > September so hopefully will be able to gather more family history. I have determined that my father in law arrived in Quebec in 1929 aboard the SS
          > Empress of Scotland, and 'rode the rails' to B.C. where he resided until his death in 1989.
          > >
          > > Of the 5 surname Galovichs in B.C., 4 belong to my immediate family
          > - the 5th one is not familiar, and I thank you for bringing him to my
          > attention.
          > > Perhaps I will attempt to get in touch and see if there is a
          > connection.
          > > Much appreciated.
          > > Pat, Mission, B.C.

          _________________

          > Since there were so few surnames Galgovics listed in the Ellis
          > Island Records I looked at the records.
          >
          > In 1900 there emigrated to the U.S. 5 surnames Galgovics.
          > Mother Maria and her 4 children.
          > They were from Kozma, Hungary which is now Kuzmice, Slovkaia and
          > located in the Trebis^ov region.
          > They went to address of her husband Josef in Franklin Furnace
          > (Of which there are a number of place names located in the U.S.)
          >
          > The Slovakia telephone directory lists a Jozef Galgovic^ under
          > Trebis^ov.
          >
          > In 1911 Mary Galgovic Mazuta, age 23, emigrated to the U.S. with a
          > Anna , age 4 years.
          > Mary was a widow, so Mazuta was her married name.
          > She was going to address of her father Jozsef Galgovics in East
          > Stroudsburg, PA.
          > Jozsef was Anna's grandfather.
          > Jozsef had lived in Franklin Furnace in 1899/1905.
          >
          > Would seem that Galgovic is a Slovak surname, spelled both
          > Galgovics in Magyar and Galgovic^ (mäkc^en^ c )
          >
          > Surname is also found in western and eastern Slovakia as is Galovic^.
          > Happy hunting !
          > Frank K
          >
        • Frank
          ... have this type of thing in my files as I have so little knowledge of Eastern Europe ... surrounding areas (much to my chagrin). I m sure the particulars
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 29, 2002
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., Pat Galovich <bill-pat_galovich@t...> wrote:
            > More great info - thanks once again Frank for your efforts. Good to
            have this type of thing in my files as I have so little knowledge of
            Eastern Europe
            > and particularly the history and culture of Slovakia, and
            surrounding areas (much to my chagrin). I'm sure the particulars you
            have provided will be of
            > help in the future. Much appreciated.
            > Regards,
            > Pat, Mission, B.C.
            ____________________
            My message didn't contain some important lines listed below.

            Sometimes emigrants to Canada, trans-shipped via the U.S.A.
            I have seen many such surnames listed in Ellis Island (NYC) ship
            manifests.

            Canada Genealogy Sources

            http://www-personal.umich.edu/%7Ecgaunt/canada.html#CANADIAN


            _________________
            >
            > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., Pat Galovich <bill-pat_galovich@t...>
            wrote:
            > > > Many thanks, Frank, for your very informative email. Two of the
            > > Galovich surnames listed in the Poprad and Bratislava regions
            belong
            > > to my husband's half-brother and half nephew. We have been in
            touch with both, but the last contact was early 2000. We are planning
            a visit next
            > > September so hopefully will be able to gather more family history.
            I have determined that my father in law arrived in Quebec in 1929
            aboard the SS
            > > Empress of Scotland, and 'rode the rails' to B.C. where he resided
            until his death in 1989.
            > > >
            > > > Of the 5 surname Galovichs in B.C., 4 belong to my immediate
            family
            > > - the 5th one is not familiar, and I thank you for bringing him to
            my
            > > attention.
            > > > Perhaps I will attempt to get in touch and see if there is a
            > > connection.
            > > > Much appreciated.
            > > > Pat, Mission, B.C.
            >
            > _________________
            >
            > > Since there were so few surnames Galgovics listed in the Ellis
            > > Island Records I looked at the records.
            > >
            > > In 1900 there emigrated to the U.S. 5 surnames Galgovics.
            > > Mother Maria and her 4 children.
            > > They were from Kozma, Hungary which is now Kuzmice, Slovkaia and
            > > located in the Trebis^ov region.
            > > They went to address of her husband Josef in Franklin Furnace
            > > (Of which there are a number of place names located in the U.S.)
            > >
            > > The Slovakia telephone directory lists a Jozef Galgovic^ under
            > > Trebis^ov.
            > >
            > > In 1911 Mary Galgovic Mazuta, age 23, emigrated to the U.S. with a
            > > Anna , age 4 years.
            > > Mary was a widow, so Mazuta was her married name.
            > > She was going to address of her father Jozsef Galgovics in East
            > > Stroudsburg, PA.
            > > Jozsef was Anna's grandfather.
            > > Jozsef had lived in Franklin Furnace in 1899/1905.
            > >
            > > Would seem that Galgovic is a Slovak surname, spelled both
            > > Galgovics in Magyar and Galgovic^ (mäkc^en^ c )
            > >
            > > Surname is also found in western and eastern Slovakia as is
            Galovic^.
            > > Happy hunting !
            > > Frank K
            > >
          • Pat Galovich
            Frank wrote: (Sometimes emigrants to Canada, trans-shipped via the U.S.A. I have seen many such surnames listed in Ellis Island (NYC) ship manifests.).....
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 29, 2002
            • 0 Attachment
              Frank wrote:
              (Sometimes emigrants to Canada, trans-shipped via the U.S.A.
              I have seen many such surnames listed in Ellis Island (NYC) ship
              manifests.).....
              Yes, I'm aware of this. My father and his parents arrived from Scotland via Ellis Isl. in 1908, and after his parents' demise, he then migrated north to
              B.C. crossing the US/Can. border as if he was taking a "Sunday stroll" - no immigration papers, border checks, or etc.!! This was circ. 1926.

              > (My message didn't contain some important lines listed below.
              > Canada Genealogy Sources).....
              > http://www-personal.umich.edu/%7Ecgaunt/canada.html#CANADIAN

              ...I appreciate the Canadian links - some I already use, but several others were new to me and I'll have fun checking them out!
              Pat
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.