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Re: Name meaning

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  • Terry L. Karkos
    ... Slovak/Surnames-Czechoslovakia.htm ... in ... Slovak ... with ... done ... even ... Slovaks ... trying ... in Slovak ... it s ... because ... the ...
    Message 1 of 14 , Nov 27, 2002
      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., "Frank" <frankur@a...> wrote:
      > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., "Terry L. Karkos" <pikagnome@e...> wrote:
      > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., "Terry L. Karkos" <pikagnome@e...>
      wrote:
      > > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., Kayne Jason <kokoja14@y...> wrote:
      > > > > Can anyone tell me where I can find out what a surname
      > > > > means? Also, does anyone know how I can get a birth
      > > > > certificate from Slovakia? Thanks
      > > > >
      > > > For what a surname means, well, you might try:
      > > >
      > > > http://www.gaminggeeks.org/Resources/KateMonk/Europe-Eastern/
      > > >
      > > > or
      > > >
      > > >
      > http://www.gaminggeeks.org/Resources/KateMonk/Europe-Eastern/Czech-
      Slovak/Surnames-Czechoslovakia.htm
      > > >
      > > > or
      > > >
      > > > http://www.gaminggeeks.org/Resources/KateMonk/
      > > >
      > > > or
      > > >
      > > > http://feefhs.org/iar/slovakia.html
      > > >
      > > > or
      > > >
      > > > http://www.svu2000.org/whatwedo/c5gd1list8.htm (this one looks
      > like
      > > a
      > > > good one to start with first)
      > > >
      > > > or try and find these books:
      > > >
      > > > http://www.slavu.sav.sk/slavica_slovaca/slavica2000b.htm
      > > (incidently,
      > > > the .pdf file on this site is 94 pages long and mostly written
      in
      > > > Slovak; takes a while to download)
      > > >
      > > > Sometimes I get lucky plugging a surname into an English -
      Slovak
      > -
      > >
      > > > English dictionary online, but if you use the Slovak-English
      > > > dictionary you have to have the Slovak word exact, complete
      with
      > > > diacritic marks and not spelled like it's pronounced (as was
      done
      > > in
      > > > many cases; of course, then there are the surnames where the
      > people
      > > > who had them, completely changed them into something else not
      even
      > > > remotely close to their Slovak origin. In one instance, in my
      > > lineage
      > > > are Topolosky's and some of them changed their name to Topping;
      > but
      > > > in the the old Slovak/Hungarian censuses, Topolosky is written
      > > > Topolovsky).
      > > >
      > > > Racial persecution was pretty rampant in those days with
      Slovaks
      > > > called Huns or Hunkys much to their dismay since they were
      trying
      > > to
      > > > escape their Hungarian oppressors....
      > > >
      > > > Anyways, I just googled for the above urls by plugging
      in "Slovak
      > > > surnames" into to-search-for box, but you could try "Slovak
      > surname
      > > > meanings." I suspect there are sites out there with meanings,
      it's
      > > > just a matter of time to research and find them... Happy
      > hunting....
      > > >
      > > > -- Terry Karkos
      > > >
      > > > http://www.exploremaine.com/~pikagnome/karkos.htm
      > > >
      >>
      >
      > Unfortunately, there is a caveat.
      >
      > Old Web sites authored by Kate Monk were removed from the WWW.
      > All her surname listings under various countries were suspect
      because
      > none of the sources were ever documentated.
      > She had taken various lists ranging from baby names to historical
      > names and just combined them into datebases.
      > Believe the Academy of St. Gabriel Library had issued a warning on
      the
      > Internet.
      >
      > Kate Monk's Onomastikon, a very large collection of name lists from
      > many different cultures around the world, intended for gamers
      looking
      > for character names.
      > An enormous amount of research went into the construction of this
      > site, but the author chose to give no information on which names
      were
      > taken from which sources. Her sources are a hodge-podge of scholarly
      > tomes, baby-name books, and everything in between. The more focused
      > lists-- like those under Medieval English Names -- are better than
      > average, but can only be taken as a starting point. These can't be
      > trusted without independent verification.
      >
      > This is a collection of names from around the world which was
      > initially intended to help provide character names for live
      > role-players. It includes short historical backgrounds, male and
      > female first names or personal names, and surnames or family names,
      > from many countries and periods.
      >
      > Onomastics is the science of the study of origin and forms of
      proper
      > names of persons or places.
      > The author was not an expert in onomastics or history so would like
      to
      > apologise if any mistakes have been made. All names included were
      from
      > genuine sources to the best of her knowledge, but this was not an
      > academic study and should not be relied upon by re-enactment
      societies
      > which require specific dates and instances of occurrence for the
      names
      > they use.
      >
      > There are no Dictionaries of Slovak surname meanings.
      > There are several Dictionary of Surnames in the $ 100 price range,
      but
      > they all seem to lack any Slovak surnames.
      >
      >
      > For example, you might find :
      >
      > Jabl~on'ski Polish: topographic name of someone who lived by an
      apple
      > tree or apple orchard, or occupational name for a grower or seller
      of
      > apples, from Pol. jabl~on' apple tree + ski suffix of local
      surnames.
      >
      > Var. : Jabl~nowski
      > Dims.: Jabl~owski; Jabl~onka
      > Cogn. : Russ.: Yablokov, Yablochkov, Yablochkin
      > Czech : Jablon(ec) Ger. : Jablonski, Gablonz
      > Jewish (Ashkenazic): Jablon(s), Jablin, Yablon, Jabloner, Yabloner,
      > Jablonsky, Yablonsky, Jablow, Yablokov, Yablokoff.
      > Patr. : Pol.: Jabl~onowicz, Jab~kiewicz (dim.)
      >
      > I suppose one could add the Slovak surnames ; Jablonicka,
      Jablonicky',
      > Jablonka, Jablonovska, Jablonovsky, Jablonska, etc.
      > Since apple is alma, almás in Hungarian there would be no equiv.
      > Magyar surnames.
      >
      > Now your surname Karkos^ was from Parchovany, Slovakia.
      >
      > The LDS filmed the R.C. parish church records (1779-1895) for
      > Parchovany, Slovakia; formerly Párnó, Zemplén megye, Hungary.
      > Text in Latin and Hungarian.
      >
      > film #
      >
      > 1923151
      > 1923152
      > 1923153
      >
      > EIR lists 14 surnames Karkos who emigrated to U.S. 1897-1911.
      > 5 surnames were from Párnó (H), 5 were from Dons^iná (Sk) Dobsina
      (H)
      > and 2 were from Russian-Poland.
      >
      > I remember story about a Andrássy coachman who eloped with the
      count's
      > (Gyula, Julius (E) 1823-1890, born in Kos^ice/Kassa.
      > Gyula had a son , but I don't know about a daughter.

      Thanks, Frank. I didn't know about the Kate Monk caveat, but being a
      roleplayer should have realized it had something to do with that by
      looking at the url. Duh.

      Where did you hear the Andrassy coachman story from? My great
      grandfather used to speak ill of Gyula Andrassy.

      The Andrassy name is interesting from a history perspective:

      http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Andrassy

      as is the history of Slovakia (wonder how much Celtic blood Slovaks
      have):

      http://gbgm-umc.org/country_profiles/country_history.cfm?Id=146

      And paragraphs 5 and 6 of:

      http://www.hungary.com/corvinus/lib/wils/wils02.htm

      explain why a lot of Slovaks began to emigrate to America.

      My Karkos line comes from the brother of a brother and sister (Andrej
      and Elizabeth) who were orphaned in Garany (Garan [diacritic \/ over
      n]). Andrej was born in 1834 and his sister born in 1832. The sister
      married an Andros Marczin and they lived in nearby Barancs (Baranc
      [diacritic \/ over c]). Andrej went to Parno.

      Just rambling....

      Terry Karkos
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