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Slovak pronunciation

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  • slovakpride
    I really appreciate everybody s help in trying to learn Slovak. My problem is, I say the words how they are spelled. John M. gave me a great link where I can
    Message 1 of 18 , Nov 11, 2002
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      I really appreciate everybody's help in trying to learn Slovak. My
      problem is, I say the words how they are spelled. John M. gave me a
      great link where I can actually hear the word being spoken. One
      question...in saying "Pleased to meet you"---"Som rada ze vas
      spoznavam"...how would you say that correctly? You guys are great!

      Rosie
    • kika3_au
      I would like t to know if the Slovak pronunciation of the surname Pauko could be mistakenly heard as Palko (or vice versa). I have traced the paternal line
      Message 2 of 18 , Feb 24, 2014
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        I would like t to know if the Slovak pronunciation of the surname 'Pauko' could be mistakenly heard as 'Palko' (or vice versa).

         

        I have traced the paternal line of my family back to Oravsky Podzamok. I had always understood that the surname of my paternal line was 'Palko'. My great grandfather had changed the surname to 'Pal' prior to World War one for business reasons when they were living in Nyireghaza in Hungary. (It was a period of 'magyarisation' of  ethnic surnames.)

        However, the further I go back in the records,  the more confusing the surname issue becomes. I have evidence that the earliest male  for which records exist was an Andras Panko or Pauko  (handwriting is difficult to determine) who was married to Susanna Tiroly. Unfortunately not all of the Oravsky Podzamok records are on-line at Family Search due to some of the records in the film being very recent.  I am considering the possiblities of a) adoption  or b) a mishearing of the surname by the priest due to the local accent.

         

        Can any of the Slovak speakers on this forum  verify my theory that the surname could have been misheard by the priest due to Slovak pronunciation?

      • Armata, Joseph R
        In some Slovak dialects (including Orava), a hard l as in Palko is pronounced like an English w. We d probably spell that Pawko in English, but in Slovak
        Message 3 of 18 , Feb 25, 2014
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          In some Slovak dialects (including Orava), a "hard l" as in Palko is pronounced like an English w. We'd probably spell that Pawko in English, but in Slovak it'd be spelled Pauko. So both ways of spelling it are right in that area.

          Linguistic sources will often spell it with the u raised above the other letters like a superscript.

          Joe


          -----Original Message-----
          From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of kika3_au@...
          Sent: Monday, February 24, 2014 5:03 PM
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [S-R] Slovak pronunciation



          I would like t to know if the Slovak pronunciation of the surname 'Pauko' could be mistakenly heard as 'Palko' (or vice versa).



          I have traced the paternal line of my family back to Oravsky Podzamok. I had always understood that the surname of my paternal line was 'Palko'. My great grandfather had changed the surname to 'Pal' prior to World War one for business reasons when they were living in Nyireghaza in Hungary. (It was a period of 'magyarisation' of ethnic surnames.)

          However, the further I go back in the records, the more confusing the surname issue becomes. I have evidence that the earliest male for which records exist was an Andras Panko or Pauko (handwriting is difficult to determine) who was married to Susanna Tiroly. Unfortunately not all of the Oravsky Podzamok records are on-line at Family Search due to some of the records in the film being very recent. I am considering the possiblities
        • William C. Wormuth
          Pauko [pahuh-koh; Palko [Pahl-koh] Pavko [Pahv-koh] All three variations exist in the Slovak telephone directory. I am not a language authority but I believe
          Message 4 of 18 , Feb 25, 2014
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            Pauko [pahuh-koh; Palko [Pahl-koh] Pavko [Pahv-koh]

            All three variations exist in the Slovak telephone directory.

            I am not a language authority but I believe the names are a derivative of the name Paul.  In western Slovakia there is an area called Zahorie.  The dialect there uses an "uhah" in place of 'L",  Palko would be Pauko, Milia [Meelah] is [Mee-uha]....etc



            On Monday, February 24, 2014 7:48 PM, "kika3_au@..." <kika3_au@...> wrote:
             
            I would like t to know if the Slovak pronunciation of the surname 'Pauko' could be mistakenly heard as 'Palko' (or vice versa).
             
            I have traced the paternal line of my family back to Oravsky Podzamok. I had always understood that the surname of my paternal line was 'Palko'. My great grandfather had changed the surname to 'Pal' prior to World War one for business reasons when they were living in Nyireghaza in Hungary. (It was a period of 'magyarisation' of  ethnic surnames.)
            However, the further I go back in the records,  the more confusing the surname issue becomes. I have evidence that the earliest male  for which records exist was an Andras Panko or Pauko  (handwriting is difficult to determine) who was married to Susanna Tiroly. Unfortunately not all of the Oravsky Podzamok records are on-line at Family Search due to some of the records in the film being very recent.  I am considering the possiblities of a) adoption  or b) a mishearing of the surname by the priest due to the local accent.
             
            Can any of the Slovak speakers on this forum  verify my theory that the surname could have been misheard by the priest due to Slovak pronunciation?


          • kika3_au
            Dear Zuzana , Joseph and William, Thank you so much for your explanation. It makes sense that the surnames are all variations of the name Paul. I was utterly
            Message 5 of 18 , Feb 25, 2014
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              Dear Zuzana , Joseph and William,

              Thank you so much for your explanation. It makes sense that the surnames are all variations of the name Paul. I was utterly confused when I cam across the reference.

              However another branch of the family from Namestovo had several different spellings of the surname over the centuries. a Vincent Sztrzata arrived from Oswiecim, Galicia in the early 1800's. thereafter the surname was spelled Styava, Stiava, Schtiava, St'ava, and teh most recent as Scawa (with accent on the 'c'.

              Catherine

            • Armata, Joseph R
              Styava, Stiava, Schtiava, St ava, and Scawa (with accent on the c ) are all different ways of spelling what we d spell as Shchava or maybe Shtyava (shtya
              Message 6 of 18 , Feb 26, 2014
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                Styava, Stiava, Schtiava, St'ava, and Scawa (with accent on the 'c') are all different ways of spelling what we'd spell as Shchava or maybe Shtyava (shtya like in the middle of the sentence "The boss wiSHED YAhoo's employees a good day").

                The original name Sztrzata looks wrong though, and it might have been spelled in Polish (Oswiecim was in Polish territory) as Strzala with a line through the "l" so it could be mistaken for a t. That's another "hard l" like you had before, and like in some Slovak dialects, in Polish the hard "l" is pronounced like English w. So if that's right, the original name would have been pronounced like Shchawa (rhymes with Jawa from Star Wars).

                Shchawa and Shchava are pretty close, but that still doesn't explain how the "w" sound became a "v" sound in the later versions of the name. In Slovak dialects, things go the other way, an underlying "v" sound can be pronounced like "w" (Liptov and Liptovsky are often pronounced Liptow and Liptowsky).

                Joe



                -----Original Message-----
                From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of kika3_au@...
                Sent: Tuesday, February 25, 2014 9:37 PM
                To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [S-R] Slovak pronunciation



                Dear Zuzana , Joseph and William,

                Thank you so much for your explanation. It makes sense that the surnames are all variations of the name Paul. I was utterly confused when I cam across the reference.

                However another branch of the family from Namestovo had several different spellings of the surname over the centuries. a Vincent Sztrzata arrived from Oswiecim, Galicia in the early 1800's. thereafter the surname was spelled Styava, Stiava, Schtiava, St'ava, and teh most recent as Scawa (with accent on the 'c'.

                Catherine
              • Zuzana Peer
                You are welcome Catherine ! On Tuesday, February 25, 2014 8:36 PM, kika3_au@yahoo.com.au wrote:   Dear Zuzana , Joseph and William,
                Message 7 of 18 , Feb 26, 2014
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                  You are welcome Catherine !


                  On Tuesday, February 25, 2014 8:36 PM, "kika3_au@..." <kika3_au@...> wrote:
                   
                  Dear Zuzana , Joseph and William,
                  Thank you so much for your explanation. It makes sense that the surnames are all variations of the name Paul. I was utterly confused when I cam across the reference.
                  However another branch of the family from Namestovo had several different spellings of the surname over the centuries. a Vincent Sztrzata arrived from Oswiecim, Galicia in the early 1800's. thereafter the surname was spelled Styava, Stiava, Schtiava, St'ava, and teh most recent as Scawa (with accent on the 'c'.
                  Catherine


                • William C. Wormuth
                  Katka, St ava, (accent over the S) [shta-va] (the t is pronounced with your toung on the roof of your mouth).  The name means juice or juices.
                  Message 8 of 18 , Feb 26, 2014
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                    Katka,
                    St'ava, (accent over the S) [shta-va] (the t' is pronounced with your toung on the roof of your mouth).  The name means "juice" or "juices.

                    http://telefonny.zoznam.sk/Stava/slovensko/

                    Vilo


                    On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 11:31 AM, Zuzana Peer <zuzana177@...> wrote:
                     
                    You are welcome Catherine !


                    On Tuesday, February 25, 2014 8:36 PM, "kika3_au@..." <kika3_au@...> wrote:
                     
                    Dear Zuzana , Joseph and William,
                    Thank you so much for your explanation. It makes sense that the surnames are all variations of the name Paul. I was utterly confused when I cam across the reference.
                    However another branch of the family from Namestovo had several different spellings of the surname over the centuries. a Vincent Sztrzata arrived from Oswiecim, Galicia in the early 1800's. thereafter the surname was spelled Styava, Stiava, Schtiava, St'ava, and teh most recent as Scawa (with accent on the 'c'.
                    Catherine




                  • Tim Day
                    I have a cousin hat lives in Giraltovce, Slovakia. He is my great grandfathers brother s son. Tim On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:52 AM, William C. Wormuth
                    Message 9 of 18 , Feb 26, 2014
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                      I have a cousin hat lives in Giraltovce, Slovakia. He is my great grandfathers brother's son.

                      Tim


                      On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:52 AM, William C. Wormuth <senzus@...> wrote:
                       
                      Katka,
                      St'ava, (accent over the S) [shta-va] (the t' is pronounced with your toung on the roof of your mouth).  The name means "juice" or "juices.

                      http://telefonny.zoznam.sk/Stava/slovensko/

                      Vilo


                      On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 11:31 AM, Zuzana Peer <zuzana177@...> wrote:
                       
                      You are welcome Catherine !


                      On Tuesday, February 25, 2014 8:36 PM, "kika3_au@..." <kika3_au@...> wrote:
                       
                      Dear Zuzana , Joseph and William,
                      Thank you so much for your explanation. It makes sense that the surnames are all variations of the name Paul. I was utterly confused when I cam across the reference.
                      However another branch of the family from Namestovo had several different spellings of the surname over the centuries. a Vincent Sztrzata arrived from Oswiecim, Galicia in the early 1800's. thereafter the surname was spelled Styava, Stiava, Schtiava, St'ava, and teh most recent as Scawa (with accent on the 'c'.
                      Catherine






                    • William C. Wormuth
                      Giraltovce [Gee-rahltohv-tseh] On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:54 PM, Tim Day wrote:   I have a cousin hat lives in Giraltovce,
                      Message 10 of 18 , Feb 26, 2014
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                        Giraltovce [Gee-rahltohv-tseh]


                        On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:54 PM, Tim Day <drsplash60@...> wrote:
                         
                        I have a cousin hat lives in Giraltovce, Slovakia. He is my great grandfathers brother's son.

                        Tim


                        On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:52 AM, William C. Wormuth <senzus@...> wrote:
                         
                        Katka,
                        St'ava, (accent over the S) [shta-va] (the t' is pronounced with your toung on the roof of your mouth).  The name means "juice" or "juices.

                        http://telefonny.zoznam.sk/Stava/slovensko/

                        Vilo


                        On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 11:31 AM, Zuzana Peer <zuzana177@...> wrote:
                         
                        You are welcome Catherine !


                        On Tuesday, February 25, 2014 8:36 PM, "kika3_au@..." <kika3_au@...> wrote:
                         
                        Dear Zuzana , Joseph and William,
                        Thank you so much for your explanation. It makes sense that the surnames are all variations of the name Paul. I was utterly confused when I cam across the reference.
                        However another branch of the family from Namestovo had several different spellings of the surname over the centuries. a Vincent Sztrzata arrived from Oswiecim, Galicia in the early 1800's. thereafter the surname was spelled Styava, Stiava, Schtiava, St'ava, and teh most recent as Scawa (with accent on the 'c'.
                        Catherine








                      • htcstech
                        I disagree on the original spelling. The Sz is a Hungarian form and sounds like the S in SEA or SEE and not SH as in SHOW. So the name as spelled Sztrzata
                        Message 11 of 18 , Feb 27, 2014
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                          I disagree on the original spelling. The Sz is a Hungarian form and sounds like the S in SEA or SEE and not SH as in SHOW. So the name as spelled "Sztrzata" is either incorrectly transcribed or more likely, someone trying to write the name in an Hungarian form without knowing how it sounds like in Hungarian. In English, using that spelling it is ST as in START+R+ZAT, so STR-ZAT and not SHTRZAT. By the way, it makes no sense to the Hungarian ear. There is no English equivalent for the Hungarian Z sound, but would lengthen the A to a double A - so STRAZAAT or STRRZAAT or STRRZART.

                          Peter M


                          On 27 February 2014 16:22, William C. Wormuth <senzus@...> wrote:
                           

                          Giraltovce [Gee-rahltohv-tseh]


                          On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:54 PM, Tim Day <drsplash60@...> wrote:
                           
                          I have a cousin hat lives in Giraltovce, Slovakia. He is my great grandfathers brother's son.

                          Tim


                          On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:52 AM, William C. Wormuth <senzus@...> wrote:
                           
                          Katka,
                          St'ava, (accent over the S) [shta-va] (the t' is pronounced with your toung on the roof of your mouth).  The name means "juice" or "juices.


                          Vilo


                          On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 11:31 AM, Zuzana Peer <zuzana177@...> wrote:
                           
                          You are welcome Catherine !


                          On Tuesday, February 25, 2014 8:36 PM, "kika3_au@..." <kika3_au@...> wrote:
                           
                          Dear Zuzana , Joseph and William,
                          Thank you so much for your explanation. It makes sense that the surnames are all variations of the name Paul. I was utterly confused when I cam across the reference.
                          However another branch of the family from Namestovo had several different spellings of the surname over the centuries. a Vincent Sztrzata arrived from Oswiecim, Galicia in the early 1800's. thereafter the surname was spelled Styava, Stiava, Schtiava, St'ava, and teh most recent as Scawa (with accent on the 'c'.
                          Catherine









                        • Ben Sorensen
                          HI Peter, No, they are right- this time sz is a sh sound. Remember these people are more northern, so Spis, Saris, and perhaps southern Poles. Sz is also
                          Message 12 of 18 , Feb 27, 2014
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                            HI Peter,
                            No, they are right- this time "sz" is a "sh" sound. Remember these people are more northern, so Spis, Saris, and perhaps southern Poles. "Sz" is also a Polish form that makes "sh."

                            Not everything is Hungarian. Stur and Bernolak would probably be offended by your assumption. :-)
                            Ben


                            On Thursday, February 27, 2014 7:05 AM, htcstech <htcstech@...> wrote:
                             
                            I disagree on the original spelling. The Sz is a Hungarian form and sounds like the S in SEA or SEE and not SH as in SHOW. So the name as spelled "Sztrzata" is either incorrectly transcribed or more likely, someone trying to write the name in an Hungarian form without knowing how it sounds like in Hungarian. In English, using that spelling it is ST as in START+R+ZAT, so STR-ZAT and not SHTRZAT. By the way, it makes no sense to the Hungarian ear. There is no English equivalent for the Hungarian Z sound, but would lengthen the A to a double A - so STRAZAAT or STRRZAAT or STRRZART.

                            Peter M


                            On 27 February 2014 16:22, William C. Wormuth <senzus@...> wrote:
                             
                            Giraltovce [Gee-rahltohv-tseh]


                            On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:54 PM, Tim Day <drsplash60@...> wrote:
                             
                            I have a cousin hat lives in Giraltovce, Slovakia. He is my great grandfathers brother's son.

                            Tim


                            On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:52 AM, William C. Wormuth <senzus@...> wrote:
                             
                            Katka,
                            St'ava, (accent over the S) [shta-va] (the t' is pronounced with your toung on the roof of your mouth).  The name means "juice" or "juices.


                            Vilo


                            On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 11:31 AM, Zuzana Peer <zuzana177@...> wrote:
                             
                            You are welcome Catherine !


                            On Tuesday, February 25, 2014 8:36 PM, "kika3_au@..." <kika3_au@...> wrote:
                             
                            Dear Zuzana , Joseph and William,
                            Thank you so much for your explanation. It makes sense that the surnames are all variations of the name Paul. I was utterly confused when I cam across the reference.
                            However another branch of the family from Namestovo had several different spellings of the surname over the centuries. a Vincent Sztrzata arrived from Oswiecim, Galicia in the early 1800's. thereafter the surname was spelled Styava, Stiava, Schtiava, St'ava, and teh most recent as Scawa (with accent on the 'c'.
                            Catherine











                          • Armata, Joseph R
                            The original surname came from Oswiecim in Galicia, so I m assuming a Polish spelling, where sz is pronounced like English sh. Joe ... From:
                            Message 13 of 18 , Feb 27, 2014
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                              The original surname came from Oswiecim in Galicia, so I'm assuming a Polish spelling, where sz is pronounced like English sh.

                              Joe


                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of htcstech
                              Sent: Thursday, February 27, 2014 7:05 AM
                              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [S-R] Slovak pronunciation



                              I disagree on the original spelling. The Sz is a Hungarian form and sounds like the S in SEA or SEE and not SH as in SHOW. So the name as spelled "Sztrzata" is either incorrectly transcribed or more likely, someone trying to write the name in an Hungarian form without knowing how it sounds like in Hungarian. In English, using that spelling it is ST as in START+R+ZAT, so STR-ZAT and not SHTRZAT. By the way, it makes no sense to the Hungarian ear. There is no English equivalent for the Hungarian Z sound, but would lengthen the A to a double A - so STRAZAAT or STRRZAAT or STRRZART.


                              Peter M



                              On 27 February 2014 16:22, William C. Wormuth <senzus@... <mailto:senzus@...> > wrote:







                              Giraltovce [Gee-rahltohv-tseh]



                              On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:54 PM, Tim Day <drsplash60@... <mailto:drsplash60@...> > wrote:


                              I have a cousin hat lives in Giraltovce, Slovakia. He is my great grandfathers brother's son.

                              Tim




                              On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:52 AM, William C. Wormuth <senzus@... <mailto:senzus@...> > wrote:


                              Katka,
                              St'ava, (accent over the S) [shta-va] (the t' is pronounced with your toung on the roof of your mouth). The name means "juice" or "juices.


                              http://telefonny.zoznam.sk/Stava/slovensko/


                              Vilo



                              On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 11:31 AM, Zuzana Peer <zuzana177@... <mailto:zuzana177@...> > wrote:


                              You are welcome Catherine !


                              On Tuesday, February 25, 2014 8:36 PM, "kika3_au@... <mailto:kika3_au@...> " <kika3_au@... <mailto:kika3_au@...> > wrote:


                              Dear Zuzana , Joseph and William,
                              Thank you so much for your explanation. It makes sense that the surnames are all variations of the name Paul. I was utterly confused when I cam across the reference.

                              However another branch of the family from Namestovo had several different spellings of the surname over the centuries. a Vincent Sztrzata arrived from Oswiecim, Galicia in the early 1800's. thereafter the surname was spelled Styava, Stiava, Schtiava, St'ava, and teh most recent as Scawa (with accent on the 'c'.
                              Catherine
                            • htcstech
                              Yes. Thanks for the clarification. I totally forgot the sz as a Polish sound! Peter M.
                              Message 14 of 18 , Feb 27, 2014
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                                Yes. Thanks for the clarification. I totally forgot the 'sz' as a Polish sound!

                                Peter M.


                                On 28 February 2014 00:27, Armata, Joseph R <armata+@...> wrote:
                                 

                                The original surname came from Oswiecim in Galicia, so I'm assuming a Polish spelling, where sz is pronounced like English sh.

                                Joe



                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of htcstech
                                Sent: Thursday, February 27, 2014 7:05 AM
                                To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [S-R] Slovak pronunciation



                                I disagree on the original spelling. The Sz is a Hungarian form and sounds like the S in SEA or SEE and not SH as in SHOW. So the name as spelled "Sztrzata" is either incorrectly transcribed or more likely, someone trying to write the name in an Hungarian form without knowing how it sounds like in Hungarian. In English, using that spelling it is ST as in START+R+ZAT, so STR-ZAT and not SHTRZAT. By the way, it makes no sense to the Hungarian ear. There is no English equivalent for the Hungarian Z sound, but would lengthen the A to a double A - so STRAZAAT or STRRZAAT or STRRZART.


                                Peter M



                                On 27 February 2014 16:22, William C. Wormuth <senzus@... <mailto:senzus@...> > wrote:







                                Giraltovce [Gee-rahltohv-tseh]



                                On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:54 PM, Tim Day <drsplash60@... <mailto:drsplash60@...> > wrote:


                                I have a cousin hat lives in Giraltovce, Slovakia. He is my great grandfathers brother's son.

                                Tim




                                On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:52 AM, William C. Wormuth <senzus@... <mailto:senzus@...> > wrote:


                                Katka,
                                St'ava, (accent over the S) [shta-va] (the t' is pronounced with your toung on the roof of your mouth). The name means "juice" or "juices.


                                http://telefonny.zoznam.sk/Stava/slovensko/


                                Vilo



                                On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 11:31 AM, Zuzana Peer <zuzana177@... <mailto:zuzana177@...> > wrote:


                                You are welcome Catherine !


                                On Tuesday, February 25, 2014 8:36 PM, "kika3_au@... <mailto:kika3_au@...> " <kika3_au@... <mailto:kika3_au@...> > wrote:


                                Dear Zuzana , Joseph and William,
                                Thank you so much for your explanation. It makes sense that the surnames are all variations of the name Paul. I was utterly confused when I cam across the reference.

                                However another branch of the family from Namestovo had several different spellings of the surname over the centuries. a Vincent Sztrzata arrived from Oswiecim, Galicia in the early 1800's. thereafter the surname was spelled Styava, Stiava, Schtiava, St'ava, and teh most recent as Scawa (with accent on the 'c'.
                                Catherine













                              • William C. Wormuth
                                Many people have problems with pronunciation.  The Ellis records and LDS have spellings in Hungarian, Polish , Slovak etc.   If you were to look for your
                                Message 15 of 18 , Feb 27, 2014
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                                  Many people have problems with pronunciation.  The Ellis records and LDS have spellings in Hungarian, Polish , Slovak etc.   If you were to look for your family name, say Sotacky, from Galicia, you would find the spelling Szotaczky [Soh- tats-kee], in Hungarian..  Now, say you were Polish, then, naturally you would pronounce it [Shoh-tah-chkee].  This site is very helpful in thsolving these problems
                                  Vilo



                                  On Thursday, February 27, 2014 7:45 PM, htcstech <htcstech@...> wrote:
                                   
                                  Yes. Thanks for the clarification. I totally forgot the 'sz' as a Polish sound!

                                  Peter M.


                                  On 28 February 2014 00:27, Armata, Joseph R <armata+@...> wrote:
                                   
                                  The original surname came from Oswiecim in Galicia, so I'm assuming a Polish spelling, where sz is pronounced like English sh.

                                  Joe


                                  -----Original Message-----
                                  From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of htcstech
                                  Sent: Thursday, February 27, 2014 7:05 AM
                                  To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: Re: [S-R] Slovak pronunciation



                                  I disagree on the original spelling. The Sz is a Hungarian form and sounds like the S in SEA or SEE and not SH as in SHOW. So the name as spelled "Sztrzata" is either incorrectly transcribed or more likely, someone trying to write the name in an Hungarian form without knowing how it sounds like in Hungarian. In English, using that spelling it is ST as in START+R+ZAT, so STR-ZAT and not SHTRZAT. By the way, it makes no sense to the Hungarian ear. There is no English equivalent for the Hungarian Z sound, but would lengthen the A to a double A - so STRAZAAT or STRRZAAT or STRRZART.


                                  Peter M



                                  On 27 February 2014 16:22, William C. Wormuth <senzus@... <mailto:senzus@...> > wrote:







                                  Giraltovce [Gee-rahltohv-tseh]



                                  On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:54 PM, Tim Day <drsplash60@... <mailto:drsplash60@...> > wrote:


                                  I have a cousin hat lives in Giraltovce, Slovakia. He is my great grandfathers brother's son.

                                  Tim




                                  On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:52 AM, William C. Wormuth <senzus@... <mailto:senzus@...> > wrote:


                                  Katka,
                                  St'ava, (accent over the S) [shta-va] (the t' is pronounced with your toung on the roof of your mouth). The name means "juice" or "juices.


                                  http://telefonny.zoznam.sk/Stava/slovensko/


                                  Vilo



                                  On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 11:31 AM, Zuzana Peer <zuzana177@... <mailto:zuzana177@...> > wrote:


                                  You are welcome Catherine !


                                  On Tuesday, February 25, 2014 8:36 PM, "kika3_au@... <mailto:kika3_au@...> " <kika3_au@... <mailto:kika3_au@...> > wrote:


                                  Dear Zuzana , Joseph and William,
                                  Thank you so much for your explanation. It makes sense that the surnames are all variations of the name Paul. I was utterly confused when I cam across the reference.

                                  However another branch of the family from Namestovo had several different spellings of the surname over the centuries. a Vincent Sztrzata arrived from Oswiecim, Galicia in the early 1800's. thereafter the surname was spelled Styava, Stiava, Schtiava, St'ava, and teh most recent as Scawa (with accent on the 'c'.
                                  Catherine















                                • kika3_au
                                  Hi Peter, Actually I think Sztrzata is a Polish spelling that has mutated over time via Hungarian, German and Slovak scribes. According to my Polish genealogy
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Feb 28, 2014
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                                    Hi Peter,

                                    Actually I think Sztrzata is a Polish spelling that has mutated over time via Hungarian, German and Slovak scribes. According to  my Polish genealogy guide, the Polish pronunciation is:

                                    sz   similar to the English 's'  in  the word 'shake' but the tongue is lower in the mouth.

                                    t is similar to the t in the English word 'take'

                                    rz is similar to the g in the English word mirage but with the tongue lower in the mouth

                                    There is also a phenomenon  in polish called regressive assimilation whereby in a cluster of consonants the last member of the cluster affects the pronunciation of those that precede it,  which might be happening in the trz sequence.

                                     

                                    Reference: In Their Words, Volume I Polish by JD Shea and WF Hoffman, page 5

                                     

                                    The link to the record (Last record in line 8 of the page) is:

                                    https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-22639-29837-46?cc=1554443&wc=M99C-C4W:1716951866

                                      Vincentius Sztrzata came from Oswiecim, Galicia,  which we know of as Auschwitz.

                                     

                                    I think there was a trade corridor through Namestovo into what is now Poland.  I have been told that the name of my (Drjemala/Driemala) family branch (who lived in Namestovo) is derived from the Polish surname Drzymala which means sleepy.

                                    Catherine

                                  • t.salony
                                    ... That little tidbit of info fascinates me. It s slightly comforting to find there is actually some method to the madness(at least to this English speaker)
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Feb 28, 2014
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                                      >>>"There is also a phenomenon  in polish called regressive assimilation
                                      whereby in a cluster of consonants the last member of the cluster affects the pronunciation of those that precede it,..."<<<
                                       That little tidbit of info fascinates me. It's slightly comforting to find there is actually some "method to the madness(at least to this English speaker)" of pronunciation in  somebody's  ancestors' language.

                                      TOM
                                    • stibila@sbcglobal.net
                                      My Grandfather and Grandmothercame to the US from Galicia/Poland in 1906. When my Dad was born in 1920 in the US and we have always pronounced SZ as sch
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Mar 1, 2014
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                                        My Grandfather and Grandmothercame to the US from Galicia/Poland in 1906. When my Dad was born in 1920 in the US and we have always pronounced SZ    as sch
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