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Re: [S-R] russian transulation?

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  • Konekta
    Dear June, Are you sure about that? If it is in russian, then it has to be written in cyrilic alphabet. Is it? Did you correctly read/transcribe the letters?
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 11, 2002
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      Dear June,
      Are you sure about that?
      If it is in russian, then it has to be written in cyrilic alphabet. Is it?
      Did you correctly read/transcribe the letters?
      Vladimir
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: McKee June
      To: slovak-roots@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, October 11, 2002 6:56 PM
      Subject: [S-R] russian transulation?


      does anyone know russian and can tell me what the name
      ELAKENADA is in english. It is the first name on my
      g-grandmothers grave and I am curious what it is. I
      was under the impression that she had a different
      first name.

      thanks,
      june

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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • McKee June
      I assume that it is in russian, I called and talked to the cementary person which told me what the grave said. I thought her name was Katalena. the last name
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 12, 2002
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        I assume that it is in russian, I called and talked to
        the cementary person which told me what the grave
        said. I thought her name was Katalena. the last name
        is panamaroff which I know is correct but dont know
        why the name elakenada is on it.

        june

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      • Alyssa Eppich
        Are you sure the first name might not be Ekaterina, Russian for Catherine? Is it possible that the cemetary person misread it? Alyssa ... From: McKee June To:
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 12, 2002
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          Are you sure the first name might not be Ekaterina, Russian for Catherine?
          Is it possible that the cemetary person misread it?
          Alyssa
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: McKee June
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2002 12:46 PM
          Subject: Re: [S-R] russian transulation?


          I assume that it is in russian, I called and talked to
          the cementary person which told me what the grave
          said. I thought her name was Katalena. the last name
          is panamaroff which I know is correct but dont know
          why the name elakenada is on it.

          june

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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • McKee June
          it is possible. I will have to give her a call and check the spelling again. I did think her name was katerina but not sure how the spelling went.
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 12, 2002
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            it is possible. I will have to give her a call and
            check the spelling again. I did think her name was
            katerina but not sure how the spelling went.

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          • Alyssa Eppich
            Transliteration from Russian will come up either Ekaterina or Yekaterina. Both mean the same thing.With a cyrillic alphabet, I could reproduce this for you. It
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 13, 2002
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              Transliteration from Russian will come up either Ekaterina or Yekaterina. Both mean the same thing.With a cyrillic alphabet, I could reproduce this for you. It looks something like this "EkatepNHa" -the "p" is an r sound in russian. The "N" is backwards(to us in English!) and the "H" is an n sound in English. Try writing that on paper and then talk with your cemetary person. Hope that helps-good luck!
              Alyssa
              Alyssa
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: McKee June
              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2002 10:05 PM
              Subject: Re: [S-R] russian transulation?


              it is possible. I will have to give her a call and
              check the spelling again. I did think her name was
              katerina but not sure how the spelling went.

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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Frank
              ... Most surname researchers whose ancestors emigrated from central and eastern Europe came via American East Coast ports of entry. We tend to forget that
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 13, 2002
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                --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., McKee June <junemckee@y...> wrote:
                > it is possible. I will have to give her a call and
                > check the spelling again. I did think her name was
                > katerina but not sure how the spelling went.
                >
                > __________________________________________________
                > Do you Yahoo!?
                > Faith Hill - Exclusive Performances, Videos & More
                > http://faith.yahoo.com

                Most surname researchers whose ancestors emigrated from central and
                eastern Europe came via American East Coast ports of entry.
                We tend to forget that after the Russian Revolution there was a
                displacement of some Russians to eastern Russia and China and
                elsewhere in Asia.
                We also tend to think that only the Chinese emigrated to the U.S. via
                San Francisco.

                Remember, for pre-1906 naturalization records you must figure out
                where the immigrant did (or could) naturalize, and look for that
                court's records.
                If it was a federal court, those records are likely at the
                appropriate Regional National Archives. After 1906 the procedure
                is just the same, except that there was a copy of ALL naturalization
                records since September 27, 1906, filed with the U.S. Immigration
                and Naturalization Service. So if you cannot determine which court
                naturalized the immigrant after 1906, or if the courthouse burned
                and the post-1906 records were lost, or you could request a copy from
                the INS under the Freedom of Information Act.

                You can e-mail the regional National Archives (NARA) Pacific Region
                (San Francisco) to search their surname naturalization index.

                Email: sanbruno.archives@...

                Maintains retired records from Federal agencies and courts in northern
                California, Hawaii, Nevada except Clark County, the Pacific Trust
                Territories, and American Samoa.

                The facility is located in San Bruno, California, approximately 12
                miles south of San Francisco, about 5 minutes from San Francisco
                International Airport.

                http://www.archives.gov/facilities/ca/san_francisco.html

                Request a surname naturalization record search and provide
                as much as you can of the following:

                Name
                Date of birth
                Place of birth
                Year of immigration
                Ship and port of arrival
                Year of naturalization
                Marital status
                Names of spouse and dependents
                Residence at time of naturalization

                Also provide your name and U.S. Postal mail address.

                NARA will also respond to your query by e-mail.
                If located , upon payment of $ 6 ? fee will mail you his
                naturalization papers.

                You will receive acknowledgement of request following a few days
                (or hours, depending on volume of requests) later with their answer.



                Her name was most likely Katherine/Catherine (E) Ekaterina (Russian)

                E K A T E | | |/| H A (Cyrillic)

                E K A T E R EE N A

                There are a number of place names Kazan' located in Russia.

                A Walter Panamaroff was born in San Francisco CA in 1920.
                There are some Panamaroff surnames going back to the 1840s on Kodiak
                Island, Alaska.
                There are still living surname Panamaroff bearers in Alaska.
                The Russians had settled Alaska early on.
                The U.S. had purchased the territory of Alaska from Russia back in
                1867.
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