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Re: Slovak migration patterns

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  • James A Honeychuck
    A book I have here confirms that the end of serfdom was a contributing factor. According to Mark Stolarik in Immigration and Urbanization, The Slovak
    Message 1 of 16 , Oct 23 4:42 AM
      A book I have here confirms that the end of serfdom was a contributing
      factor. According to Mark Stolarik in Immigration and Urbanization, The
      Slovak Experience, 1870-1918 (p. 8), "While earlier Slovak migrations
      usually involved the quest for new land in sparsely populated areas, the
      migration which followed the abolition of serfdom in 1848 sprang largely
      from the search for work, whether in another village or in a city,
      nearby or far away. All of Europe witnessed, in the second half of the
      nineteenth century, a rural-urban migration which continued into the
      twentieth century..."

      One of the main ideas of this book is that Slovaks were already on
      the move when recruiters for American coal mines came to Slovakia.

      Jim Honeychuck


      JArcher360@... wrote:
      >
      > From: JArcher360@...
      >
      > My grandparents, and two of my grandmother's brothers came to the US around
      > 1912. One of the brothers returned to Slovakia after several years, having
      > worked in the Pa. coal mines. Seemed strange to see things like an old
      > Singer sewing machine in the house of a cousin in Bratislava. In regard to
      > the immigration patterns---I have been told that the end of serf status or
      > whatever it is called influenced the numbers of people who left Slovakia.
      > Anyone have some dates/verification?
      >
      >
    • Andrea Vangor
      But if you look at this excellent web site, provided by a Canadian Slovak researcher, it discusses the attempts of the Hungarian government to prevent such
      Message 2 of 16 , Oct 23 4:17 PM
        But if you look at this excellent web site, provided by a Canadian Slovak
        researcher, it discusses the attempts of the Hungarian government to prevent
        such emigration!

        http://ist.uwaterloo.ca/~marj/genealogy/europesouth.html

        Their attempts failed, of course. Fully 1/4 of the "white" ie non-Gypsy,
        population of Slovakia emigrated in the last two decades before WWI,
        according to a source I just read. I have just made some discoveries,
        further, about how Slovaks who went to the Pennsylvania mines in the 1880's
        were in turn recruited by the Canadian agent Esterhazy, himself an
        immigrant. Some ended up homesteading in the West, working on railroads, or
        in other mines -- I now know how my relatives who ended up in Hazleton, PA
        got to Canada. This man recruited Slovaks from that mining town.


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: James A Honeychuck <jimhoney@...>
        To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@onelist.com>
        Sent: Saturday, October 23, 1999 4:42 AM
        Subject: Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Slovak migration patterns


        > From: James A Honeychuck <jimhoney@...>
        >
        > A book I have here confirms that the end of serfdom was a contributing
        > factor. According to Mark Stolarik in Immigration and Urbanization, The
        > Slovak Experience, 1870-1918 (p. 8), "While earlier Slovak migrations
        > usually involved the quest for new land in sparsely populated areas, the
        > migration which followed the abolition of serfdom in 1848 sprang largely
        > from the search for work, whether in another village or in a city,
        > nearby or far away. All of Europe witnessed, in the second half of the
        > nineteenth century, a rural-urban migration which continued into the
        > twentieth century..."
        >
        > One of the main ideas of this book is that Slovaks were already on
        > the move when recruiters for American coal mines came to Slovakia.
        >
        > Jim Honeychuck
        >
        >
        > JArcher360@... wrote:
        > >
        > > From: JArcher360@...
        > >
        > > My grandparents, and two of my grandmother's brothers came to the US
        around
        > > 1912. One of the brothers returned to Slovakia after several years,
        having
        > > worked in the Pa. coal mines. Seemed strange to see things like an old
        > > Singer sewing machine in the house of a cousin in Bratislava. In regard
        to
        > > the immigration patterns---I have been told that the end of serf status
        or
        > > whatever it is called influenced the numbers of people who left
        Slovakia.
        > > Anyone have some dates/verification?
        > >
        > >
        > >
      • Arejayemm@xxx.xxx
        I m very glad to learn this bit of information regarding Slovak migration to Canada. My grandmother had a sister who came to Canada with her husband. He died
        Message 3 of 16 , Oct 23 5:52 PM
          I'm very glad to learn this bit of information regarding Slovak migration to
          Canada. My grandmother had a sister who came to Canada with her husband. He
          died and she was sent back to Hungary. (atleast this is how the story goes)
          My grandmother had tried to get her to come to the US but could not get her
          in.

          -Mary Jane Boyd
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