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Re: Slovak migration patterns

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  • sabinov@xxxxx.xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx)
    In my opinion (and I m certainly not an expert) any migration at this time period boiled down to where they could get a job and make $$$. Word of mouth
    Message 1 of 16 , Oct 22, 1999
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      In my opinion (and I'm certainly not an expert) any migration at this
      time period boiled down to where they could get a job and make $$$.

      Word of mouth probably worked well in getting the word out as to where
      jobs were, and of course sending over for the rest of the family who
      then often worked in the same place.

      In my own Silhavy experience, my great uncle came over and worked in the
      mines near Sheppton Pennsylvania, tho his uncle who sponsored him owned
      the town's grocery store. His mother and siblings followed within a
      year. And then after 6 months in the mines, the two boys (only aged 16
      and 18) said "Enough of this" and they all moved to Bridgeport CT where
      they promptly joined the fire department, where many other Slovak and
      Irish immigrants worked.


      I suppose in many ways it's not so different than today, when many
      people still get jobs because they know someone who can get them on
      somewhere. Sometimes I guess it does boil down to "who you know".

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Maura Petzolt Mobile Alabama USA
      sabinov@...
      Helpful Hints for Successful Searching
      http://www.rootsweb.com/~irlwat/instruct.htm
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    • RMH
      ... From: Maureen Pulignano To: Sent: Friday, October 22, 1999 6:38 PM Subject: Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Slovak
      Message 2 of 16 , Oct 22, 1999
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Maureen Pulignano <deefalt@...>
        To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@onelist.com>
        Sent: Friday, October 22, 1999 6:38 PM
        Subject: Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Slovak migration patterns


        > From: Maureen Pulignano <deefalt@...>
        >
        > Please answer a dumb question: Where is Haverstraw?
        > Thanks,
        > Maureen
        >
        >
        Dear Maureen and List _

        Dear Maureen - not a dumb question at all, if you don't know, and why
        should you if you don't live here?

        Haverstraw is in Rockland County, which is the smallest county in NY State
        outside of NYC. It's on the west side of the Hudson River, about 20 miles
        from NYC, and is the first county north of the NJ line. I actually live
        only about a mile and a half from NJ.

        Because Haverstraw is right on the Hudson River, it was possible to ship the
        bricks by barge to NYC. The Hudson is its widest at Haverstraw - it's four
        miles wide at Haverstraw bay. Below is something I previously compiled:

        BRICKMAKING ALONG THE HUDSON RIVER

        The extent of the industry

        At its height, the brick industry in North Rockland employed some 2500 men
        in the brick plants, and 10,000 men, women and children were supported by
        the industry.

        The Haverstraw bay area, including Haverstraw, West Haverstraw, Grassy
        Point, Garnerville, Stony Point, Tomkins Cove and Jones Point, was once the
        greatest center of brick production in the world.

        When World War II came, brickmaking was considered a non-essential
        industry - it had flourished for about 75 years, beginning to grow when an
        improved brickmaking machine was invented in 1852 by Richard VerValen.

        A spectacular deposit of rich blue clay was formed by blankets of ice
        weighing millions of tons during the last Ice Age, which had crushed the
        rocks of many mountains into a flour-textured clay. This came to rest in the
        bays and coves of the newly carved Hudson River. In 1928 test borings made
        in the Hudson off the old Cofferdam in southern Haverstraw, drilled 100 feet
        deep without drilling through the clay.

        In 1883 there were 41 brickyards in North Rockland, and over a century of
        manufacturing, 148 brands were moulded in the vicinity. In a single year
        300,000,000 bricks were shipped out of the Haverstraw Bay area for the NY
        metropolitan markets, which at times were using over a billion brick
        annually. The Great Depression began the decline, coupled with European
        brick coming into the markets after WWI, and then engineering ideas changed,
        and glass, aluminum and veneers over poured concrete foundations were used
        instead of brick for building.

        In 1835 there was a terrible fire in NYC and 674 buildings in the Wall
        Street area were burned, and 13 acres of the financial district devastated.
        This, along with the growing population of NYC due to immigration, created a
        great need for building materials. Then, in the 1890's there was a
        stupendous building boom in the NYC area.

        Regina Rabatin Haring, Nanuet, Rockland County, NY
      • JArcher360@xxx.xxx
        My grandparents, and two of my grandmother s brothers came to the US around 1912. One of the brothers returned to Slovakia after several years, having worked
        Message 3 of 16 , Oct 22, 1999
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          My grandparents, and two of my grandmother's brothers came to the US around
          1912. One of the brothers returned to Slovakia after several years, having
          worked in the Pa. coal mines. Seemed strange to see things like an old
          Singer sewing machine in the house of a cousin in Bratislava. In regard to
          the immigration patterns---I have been told that the end of serf status or
          whatever it is called influenced the numbers of people who left Slovakia.
          Anyone have some dates/verification?
        • RMH
          The most amazing thing to me is that the wages that our ancestors could earn working in the mines, while they would seem so low to us, were nevertheless enough
          Message 4 of 16 , Oct 22, 1999
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            The most amazing thing to me is that the wages that our ancestors could earn
            working in the mines, while they would seem so low to us, were nevertheless
            enough that they could save, and go back to Europe, and consider themselves
            "well off" when they got there. This is the story of my grandmother's
            brother.
            Regina Haring
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: <JArcher360@...>
            To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@onelist.com>
            Sent: Friday, October 22, 1999 10:09 PM
            Subject: Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Slovak migration patterns


            > From: JArcher360@...
            >
            > My grandparents, and two of my grandmother's brothers came to the US
            around
            > 1912. One of the brothers returned to Slovakia after several years,
            having
            > worked in the Pa. coal mines. Seemed strange to see things like an old
            > Singer sewing machine in the house of a cousin in Bratislava. In regard
            to
            > the immigration patterns---I have been told that the end of serf status or
            > whatever it is called influenced the numbers of people who left Slovakia.
            > Anyone have some dates/verification?
            >
            > >
            >
          • James A Honeychuck
            A book I have here confirms that the end of serfdom was a contributing factor. According to Mark Stolarik in Immigration and Urbanization, The Slovak
            Message 5 of 16 , Oct 23, 1999
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              A book I have here confirms that the end of serfdom was a contributing
              factor. According to Mark Stolarik in Immigration and Urbanization, The
              Slovak Experience, 1870-1918 (p. 8), "While earlier Slovak migrations
              usually involved the quest for new land in sparsely populated areas, the
              migration which followed the abolition of serfdom in 1848 sprang largely
              from the search for work, whether in another village or in a city,
              nearby or far away. All of Europe witnessed, in the second half of the
              nineteenth century, a rural-urban migration which continued into the
              twentieth century..."

              One of the main ideas of this book is that Slovaks were already on
              the move when recruiters for American coal mines came to Slovakia.

              Jim Honeychuck


              JArcher360@... wrote:
              >
              > From: JArcher360@...
              >
              > My grandparents, and two of my grandmother's brothers came to the US around
              > 1912. One of the brothers returned to Slovakia after several years, having
              > worked in the Pa. coal mines. Seemed strange to see things like an old
              > Singer sewing machine in the house of a cousin in Bratislava. In regard to
              > the immigration patterns---I have been told that the end of serf status or
              > whatever it is called influenced the numbers of people who left Slovakia.
              > Anyone have some dates/verification?
              >
              >
            • Andrea Vangor
              But if you look at this excellent web site, provided by a Canadian Slovak researcher, it discusses the attempts of the Hungarian government to prevent such
              Message 6 of 16 , Oct 23, 1999
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                But if you look at this excellent web site, provided by a Canadian Slovak
                researcher, it discusses the attempts of the Hungarian government to prevent
                such emigration!

                http://ist.uwaterloo.ca/~marj/genealogy/europesouth.html

                Their attempts failed, of course. Fully 1/4 of the "white" ie non-Gypsy,
                population of Slovakia emigrated in the last two decades before WWI,
                according to a source I just read. I have just made some discoveries,
                further, about how Slovaks who went to the Pennsylvania mines in the 1880's
                were in turn recruited by the Canadian agent Esterhazy, himself an
                immigrant. Some ended up homesteading in the West, working on railroads, or
                in other mines -- I now know how my relatives who ended up in Hazleton, PA
                got to Canada. This man recruited Slovaks from that mining town.


                ----- Original Message -----
                From: James A Honeychuck <jimhoney@...>
                To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@onelist.com>
                Sent: Saturday, October 23, 1999 4:42 AM
                Subject: Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Slovak migration patterns


                > From: James A Honeychuck <jimhoney@...>
                >
                > A book I have here confirms that the end of serfdom was a contributing
                > factor. According to Mark Stolarik in Immigration and Urbanization, The
                > Slovak Experience, 1870-1918 (p. 8), "While earlier Slovak migrations
                > usually involved the quest for new land in sparsely populated areas, the
                > migration which followed the abolition of serfdom in 1848 sprang largely
                > from the search for work, whether in another village or in a city,
                > nearby or far away. All of Europe witnessed, in the second half of the
                > nineteenth century, a rural-urban migration which continued into the
                > twentieth century..."
                >
                > One of the main ideas of this book is that Slovaks were already on
                > the move when recruiters for American coal mines came to Slovakia.
                >
                > Jim Honeychuck
                >
                >
                > JArcher360@... wrote:
                > >
                > > From: JArcher360@...
                > >
                > > My grandparents, and two of my grandmother's brothers came to the US
                around
                > > 1912. One of the brothers returned to Slovakia after several years,
                having
                > > worked in the Pa. coal mines. Seemed strange to see things like an old
                > > Singer sewing machine in the house of a cousin in Bratislava. In regard
                to
                > > the immigration patterns---I have been told that the end of serf status
                or
                > > whatever it is called influenced the numbers of people who left
                Slovakia.
                > > Anyone have some dates/verification?
                > >
                > >
                > >
              • Arejayemm@xxx.xxx
                I m very glad to learn this bit of information regarding Slovak migration to Canada. My grandmother had a sister who came to Canada with her husband. He died
                Message 7 of 16 , Oct 23, 1999
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                  I'm very glad to learn this bit of information regarding Slovak migration to
                  Canada. My grandmother had a sister who came to Canada with her husband. He
                  died and she was sent back to Hungary. (atleast this is how the story goes)
                  My grandmother had tried to get her to come to the US but could not get her
                  in.

                  -Mary Jane Boyd
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