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Re: [S-R] Spelling of surname of wife

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  • John M,
    ... I believe it would likely be Marko. The Bratislava directory has many Marko and Markova listed. ... That s similar to my experience with church registers
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 4 8:20 PM
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      At 16:46 04.09.2002 -0700, you wrote:
      >Hi Marge,
      >
      >I'm not an expert. However, I've been told by some
      >cousins in Slovakia that females end their name in
      >-ova. So my surname Skvarenina becomes Skvareninova
      >for the females. I have a copy of a photo from the
      >1930s or 40s of a baby and on the back it says in
      >Slovak, little Katya Skvareninova. I also have met a
      >cousin via email who introduced herself as having a
      >maiden name of Skvareninova. Her married name is
      >Markova, but I don't know what her husband's is.

      I believe it would likely be Marko. The Bratislava directory has many
      Marko and Markova listed.

      >That said, I have found 32 Skvarenina's that came over
      >through Ellis Island. Ten or so were female and none
      >used the -ova. All were listed as Skvarenina or some
      >misspelling thereof. Likewise I have found 40 or 50
      >Skvarenina's in the 1869 Hungarian census and all were
      >spelled the same, male or female. So I think that
      >maybe under the Hungarian rule, the -ova wasn't used.

      That's similar to my experience with church registers up to 1895. My
      mother and half sister emigrated in 1920 after the formation of
      Czechoslovakia. I couldn't find them in the EIDB among the 162 other women
      and girls that had the same surname. I tried the "ova" ending and, voila,
      they were the only two with that surname that used the "ova" ending. It
      made sense when I remembered that the country was now part of Czechoslovakia.

      John
    • frankly1us
      ... version of ... be. Can ... Manifests? ... Island ... before ... twice, but ... questions, and ... Why, she would use name Pavliková, but her family name
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 5 5:47 AM
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        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., Mebjwb@a... wrote:
        > Hi,
        >
        > I understand that in Czech/Slovak culture, the wife's name was a
        version of
        > her husband's surname. I cannot remember what the version would
        be.
        Can
        > anyone tell me what name the wife would use for "Pavlik"?
        >
        > Based on that information, were those surname versions used in ship
        Manifests?
        > I cannot find my maternal Grandmother's name on any lists for Ellis
        Island
        > from 1899 (arrival of Grandfather) through 1906. They were married
        before
        > they emigrated, and they show his status as "M". She came here
        twice, but
        > I cannot find her listed.
        >
        > I would like to say thanks to all of you for responding to my
        questions, and
        > giving so much helpful information. I really do appreciate it.
        >
        > Marge Bonifield
        >
        Why, she would use name Pavliková, but her family name was still
        Pavlik.
        Using Slovakia telephone directory enter Pavlik under Bra (Bratislava)
        130 surnames are listed broken out between Pavlik (males) and
        Pavliková (females)
        Today, most -ovás listed on the WWW are 'Miss Slavic World
        something', or professionals, DR. or Engineer etc.


        One of most common Slavic surname affixes is the one denoting gender
        of the bearer -ová (Slovak), -owa (Polish), and -oba (Russian).

        As a rule of Slovak grammar, female surnames end in -á, -ská,
        or -ová.
        The feminine form of the surnames is considered merely a separate form
        of same surname, not a distinct surname in itself.
        If the surname is adjectival in origin , i.e., ends in -y', the ending
        changes to -á, so that wife of pán (Mr.) C^erny' would be pani
        (Mrs.) C^erná and their daughter would be slec^na (Miss)
        C^erná

        If surname is a noun in form or origin the suffix -ová is added to
        it,e.g., pán Kovác^, pani Kovác^ová, slec^na
        Kovác^ová.

        -ova version of surname wasn't used often in ship manifests because
        most ships Slavic emigrants used were German from German ports of
        exit. (some may dispute this)
        And in some ship manifests a woman may have been listed under her
        maiden
        name, eventhough she was married under another surname.


        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Joseph Fedor
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        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 7 9:47 AM
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          --- frankly1us <frankur@...> wrote:
          > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., Mebjwb@a... wrote:
          > > Hi,
          > >
          > > I understand that in Czech/Slovak culture, the
          > wife's name was a
          > version of
          > > her husband's surname. I cannot remember what the
          > version would
          > be.
          > Can
          > > anyone tell me what name the wife would use for
          > "Pavlik"?
          > >
          > > Based on that information, were those surname
          > versions used in ship
          > Manifests?
          > > I cannot find my maternal Grandmother's name on
          > any lists for Ellis
          > Island
          > > from 1899 (arrival of Grandfather) through 1906.
          > They were married
          > before
          > > they emigrated, and they show his status as "M".
          > She came here
          > twice, but
          > > I cannot find her listed.
          > >
          > > I would like to say thanks to all of you for
          > responding to my
          > questions, and
          > > giving so much helpful information. I really do
          > appreciate it.
          > >
          > > Marge Bonifield
          > >
          > Why, she would use name Pavlikov�, but her family
          > name was still
          > Pavlik.
          > Using Slovakia telephone directory enter Pavlik
          > under Bra (Bratislava)
          > 130 surnames are listed broken out between Pavlik
          > (males) and
          > Pavlikov� (females)
          > Today, most -ov�s listed on the WWW are 'Miss Slavic
          > World
          > something', or professionals, DR. or Engineer etc.
          >
          >
          > One of most common Slavic surname affixes is the one
          > denoting gender
          > of the bearer -ov� (Slovak), -owa (Polish), and -oba
          > (Russian).
          >
          > As a rule of Slovak grammar, female surnames end in
          > -�, -sk�,
          > or -ov�.
          > The feminine form of the surnames is considered
          > merely a separate form
          > of same surname, not a distinct surname in itself.
          > If the surname is adjectival in origin , i.e., ends
          > in -y', the ending
          > changes to -�, so that wife of p�n (Mr.) C^erny'
          > would be pani
          > (Mrs.) C^ern� and their daughter would be slec^na
          > (Miss)
          > C^ern�
          >
          > If surname is a noun in form or origin the suffix
          > -ov� is added to
          > it,e.g., p�n Kov�c^, pani Kov�c^ov�, slec^na
          > Kov�c^ov�.
          >
          > -ova version of surname wasn't used often in ship
          > manifests because
          > most ships Slavic emigrants used were German from
          > German ports of
          > exit. (some may dispute this)
          > And in some ship manifests a woman may have been
          > listed under her
          > maiden
          > name, eventhough she was married under another
          > surname.
          >
          >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
          > removed]
          >
          >


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        • Joseph Fedor
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          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 7 9:48 AM
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            --- "John M," <jmatsko4@...> wrote:
            > At 16:46 04.09.2002 -0700, you wrote:
            > >Hi Marge,
            > >
            > >I'm not an expert. However, I've been told by some
            > >cousins in Slovakia that females end their name in
            > >-ova. So my surname Skvarenina becomes
            > Skvareninova
            > >for the females. I have a copy of a photo from the
            > >1930s or 40s of a baby and on the back it says in
            > >Slovak, little Katya Skvareninova. I also have met
            > a
            > >cousin via email who introduced herself as having a
            > >maiden name of Skvareninova. Her married name is
            > >Markova, but I don't know what her husband's is.
            >
            > I believe it would likely be Marko. The Bratislava
            > directory has many
            > Marko and Markova listed.
            >
            > >That said, I have found 32 Skvarenina's that came
            > over
            > >through Ellis Island. Ten or so were female and
            > none
            > >used the -ova. All were listed as Skvarenina or
            > some
            > >misspelling thereof. Likewise I have found 40 or
            > 50
            > >Skvarenina's in the 1869 Hungarian census and all
            > were
            > >spelled the same, male or female. So I think that
            > >maybe under the Hungarian rule, the -ova wasn't
            > used.
            >
            > That's similar to my experience with church
            > registers up to 1895. My
            > mother and half sister emigrated in 1920 after the
            > formation of
            > Czechoslovakia. I couldn't find them in the EIDB
            > among the 162 other women
            > and girls that had the same surname. I tried the
            > "ova" ending and, voila,
            > they were the only two with that surname that used
            > the "ova" ending. It
            > made sense when I remembered that the country was
            > now part of Czechoslovakia.
            >
            > John
            >
            >
            >


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          • Joseph Fedor
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            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 7 9:49 AM
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              --- "John M," <jmatsko4@...> wrote:
              > At 18:21 04.09.2002 -0400, you wrote:
              > >Hi,
              > >
              > >I understand that in Czech/Slovak culture, the
              > wife's name was a version of
              > >her husband's surname. I cannot remember what the
              > version would be. Can
              > >anyone tell me what name the wife would use for
              > "Pavlik"?
              >
              > From a post to another list:
              >
              > "If a man's name is a noun, his wife's name takes
              > the -ova ending.
              > Mr. Strom and Mrs. Stromova (strom = tree)
              > Mr. Kolbasa and Mrs. Kolbasova (kolbasa =
              > sausage)
              > Mr. Spisak and Mrs. Spisakova (Spisak = a
              > person from Spis county)
              >
              > Putting -ov on the end of a noun turns it into an
              > adjective (Stromov
              > means "Strom's", as in Stromov dom = Strom's house).
              > The adjective
              > then takes the normal endings - since the woman is
              > feminine, it
              > takes an -a ending. So "Stromova" ..........
              >
              > If the man's name is already an adjective though
              > (typically ends in -
              > y), the woman's name just changes the masculine -y
              > ending to the
              > feminine -a ending.
              > Mr. Mlady and Mrs. Mlada (mlady = young)
              > Mr. Pekny and Mrs. Pekna (pekny = pretty)
              > Mr. Spissky and Mrs. Spisska (spissky = having
              > to do with Spis
              > county)
              >
              > Joe
              > joe@..."
              >
              > **********
              >
              > Base on the above, the feminine form of Pavlik would
              > be Pavlikova.
              >
              > John
              >
              >
              >


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            • Joseph Fedor
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              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 7 9:50 AM
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                --- Tim Skvarenina <tskvarenina@...> wrote:
                > Hi Marge,
                >
                > I'm not an expert. However, I've been told by some
                > cousins in Slovakia that females end their name in
                > -ova. So my surname Skvarenina becomes Skvareninova
                > for the females. I have a copy of a photo from the
                > 1930s or 40s of a baby and on the back it says in
                > Slovak, little Katya Skvareninova. I also have met
                > a
                > cousin via email who introduced herself as having a
                > maiden name of Skvareninova. Her married name is
                > Markova, but I don't know what her husband's is.
                >
                > That said, I have found 32 Skvarenina's that came
                > over
                > through Ellis Island. Ten or so were female and
                > none
                > used the -ova. All were listed as Skvarenina or
                > some
                > misspelling thereof. Likewise I have found 40 or 50
                > Skvarenina's in the 1869 Hungarian census and all
                > were
                > spelled the same, male or female. So I think that
                > maybe under the Hungarian rule, the -ova wasn't
                > used.
                >
                > Tim Skvarenina
                >
                >
                >
                > --- Mebjwb@... wrote:
                > > Hi,
                > >
                > > I understand that in Czech/Slovak culture, the
                > > wife's name was a version of
                > > her husband's surname. I cannot remember what the
                > > version would be. Can
                > > anyone tell me what name the wife would use for
                > > "Pavlik"?
                > >
                > > Based on that information, were those surname
                > > versions used in ship Manifests?
                > > I cannot find my maternal Grandmother's name on
                > any
                > > lists for Ellis Island
                > > from 1899 (arrival of Grandfather) through 1906.
                > > They were married before
                > > they emigrated, and they show his status as "M".
                >
                > > She came here twice, but
                > > I cannot find her listed.
                > >
                > > I would like to say thanks to all of you for
                > > responding to my questions, and
                > > giving so much helpful information. I really do
                > > appreciate it.
                > >
                > > Marge Bonifield
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                > > removed]
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                > __________________________________________________
                > Do You Yahoo!?
                > Yahoo! Finance - Get real-time stock quotes
                > http://finance.yahoo.com
                >


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              • Joseph Fedor
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                Message 7 of 10 , Sep 7 9:51 AM
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                  --- Mebjwb@... wrote:
                  > Hi,
                  >
                  > I understand that in Czech/Slovak culture, the
                  > wife's name was a version of
                  > her husband's surname. I cannot remember what the
                  > version would be. Can
                  > anyone tell me what name the wife would use for
                  > "Pavlik"?
                  >
                  > Based on that information, were those surname
                  > versions used in ship Manifests?
                  > I cannot find my maternal Grandmother's name on any
                  > lists for Ellis Island
                  > from 1899 (arrival of Grandfather) through 1906.
                  > They were married before
                  > they emigrated, and they show his status as "M".
                  > She came here twice, but
                  > I cannot find her listed.
                  >
                  > I would like to say thanks to all of you for
                  > responding to my questions, and
                  > giving so much helpful information. I really do
                  > appreciate it.
                  >
                  > Marge Bonifield
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                  > removed]
                  >
                  >


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