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Re: Town of Lejskove and more questions.

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  • frankly1us
    ... of ... In Hungarian and Slavic languages the letter j is pron. y. Benjak is pron. Benyak. ja is pron. yah. Or, Jugoslavia is pron. Yugoslavia. A Leskove is
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 23, 2002
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      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., "vwonxtc" <maze_r@h...> wrote:
      > I just got the SS-5 form for my Great Grandmother back, with alot
      of
      > good info, one they gave me the SSN of my GGrandfather who's i
      > couldnt locate anywhere so i can find out who this Stefan Kondrc
      > is :). 2 I realized that i was spelling my GGrandmothers name
      > wrong its not BENYAK, its BENJAK (is that still the same
      > pronunciation?) The Place of Birth is stated as Lejskove,
      > CzechSlovakia, she was born 1890, so im not sure, and also I now
      > have her parents name
      >
      > Maria Lisciski
      > Paul Benjak No info on them as of now, but its more of a start.


      In Hungarian and Slavic languages the letter j is pron. y.
      Benjak is pron. Benyak.
      ja is pron. yah.

      Or, Jugoslavia is pron. Yugoslavia.


      A Leskove is located 181 miles ESE of Praha, Czech Republic
      and near the western Slovakia border west of Z^ilina.

      Lisciski appears to be a Polish surname.

      Many Polish surnames end in -ski or -cki.
      In older records you sometimes read -sky (before spelling rules
      were adapted); but in recent times tendency to insist on -ski.
      Probably a possessive affix added to name which evolved from person's
      characteristics (such as 'tall, short, etc.), occupation, or place
      of residence.
      In Czech and Slovak, the -sky is akin to the Polish -ski, while -cky
      is similar to Polish -cki.

      There was no country called Czechoslovakia until 1920.
      Czech-Bohemia (including Moravia 1849-1918) was a kingdom
      (10th century-1918) and part of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy.
      It was an Austrian Kronland (province)

      Before WW I, Slovakia was part of Upper Hungary (Felvidék) and
      part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (1867-1918) and earlier a
      part of Hungary under the Austrian Empire.
      Hungarian names were used for towns.
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