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Hobor - Raab- Zips region

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  • geoandgin
    I am searching for information concerning my ancestors. Joseph Raab, born 3/19/1849 - Kniesen (Hnieznde) Spis region. Charles Alexander Hobor, born 1/24/1877
    Message 1 of 3 , May 22, 2002
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      I am searching for information concerning my ancestors.

      Joseph Raab, born 3/19/1849 - Kniesen (Hnieznde) Spis region.
      Charles Alexander Hobor, born 1/24/1877 -Kniesen
      Julia Raab Hobor, born 5/9/1879 - Kniesen

      Is there a local government or Catholic Church in the Spis (Zips)
      region that could provide information concerning records of births,
      weddings or baptismal records.

      Thank you for any help you can provide.
      Ginny Schulze
      Pennsylvania, USA
      geoandgin@...
    • frankly1us
      ... towns of Levoc^a (Sv)/ Leutschau (G) and Kez^marok (Sv)/Késmárk (H)/Käsmarkt(G) The Spis^ enclave was expanded through special privileges granted in
      Message 2 of 3 , May 23, 2002
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        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., "geoandgin" <geoandgin@y...> wrote:
        > I am searching for information concerning my ancestors.
        >
        > Joseph Raab, born 3/19/1849 - Kniesen (Hnieznde) Spis region.
        > Charles Alexander Hobor, born 1/24/1877 -Kniesen
        > Julia Raab Hobor, born 5/9/1879 - Kniesen
        >
        > Is there a local government or Catholic Church in the Spis (Zips)
        > region that could provide information concerning records of births,
        > weddings or baptismal records.
        >
        > Thank you for any help you can provide.
        > Ginny Schulze
        > Pennsylvania, USA
        > geoandgin@y...

        Raab is a German surname.
        Hobor is probably a Slovak surname.
        There were German settlements in Upper-Hungary (later Slovakia)
        Kniesen (G) Hniezdne (Sk) Gnézda (H) is located west of Stará
        L'ubovn^a, Slovakia.

        Not all people in East Central Europe who later spoke German
        owed their heritage to German settlers. Many were descendants of
        Germanized Slavs and in some cases Magyars whose ancestors had
        intermarried with neighbors of Germanic origin.

        Among the earliest German colonies were those begun in the late
        12th c in Transylvania (Hungary, later Romania) and in the
        mountainous area of Spis^/Zips/ Szepes county in northern Hungary near the =
        towns of Levoc^a (Sv)/ Leutschau (G) and Kez^marok (Sv)/Késmárk
        (H)/Käsmarkt(G)
        The Spis^ enclave was expanded through special privileges granted in
        1224 and 1271.
        It was at this time that the "Saxons" (actually not from Saxony but
        from the Rhineland) came in large numbers.

        The German colonists brought legal models that formed the basis of
        their special privileged status. Called 'German City Law' these meant that =
        they could within their "new cities" direct their economic activity and gove=
        rn themseleves through an elected city council.
        South German Law (based on models of Nürnberg or Vienna) was
        adopted for Levoc^a (Sv) Lo"cse (H) Leutschau (G), Kos^ice (Sv) Kassa (H) K=
        aschau (G), Kez^marok (Sv) Késmárk (H) Käsmarkt (G), and Pres^ov
        (Sv) Epérjes (H) Preschau (G)

        It was during the 13th c that organized efforts were undertaken to
        settle Carpathian Rus' with East Slavic farmers and shepherds from
        neighboring Galicija (Poland)
        Early in 15th c the 16 towns in the northen Spis^ region of central
        Slovakia (including Stará L'ubovn^a and L'ubica)- near to but not
        including the royal Saxon towns of Käsmark and Leutschau - were
        sold to Poland, under whose rule they remained 1412-1772.

        Before WW I, Slovakia was part of Upper Hungary (Felvidék) and
        part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (1867-1918) and earlier a
        part of Hungary under the Austrian Empire.


        During 1950-1951, the Communist government of Czechoslovakia had
        all the parish churches send their old matriky (pre-1895 church
        records) to the regional State Archives for safekeeping .
        This was done through local national committees after the church
        registers were declared state property by the government.

        Some parish churches kept duplicate copies of the records.
        Druhopisy (i.e. second writing) was a duplicate copy known as the
        'bishop's copy'. So a duplicate of the original record may have been
        sent elsewhere.
        Some years have both parish records and "bishop's copies". Other
        years have only "bishop's copies", others only the parish registers. That c=
        an explain why a record may not be available at the parish but still be ava=
        ilable elsewhere.
        From 1828, the parish was obliged to make a copy of entries and
        send them to archives, so some records are preserved in duplicate.

        The LDS-Mormons has filmed all the parish church records at six
        of the seven regional Slovak State Archives in Slovakia.

        These microfilm reels are available for rental and viewing at any
        Family History Center (FHC) worldwide.
        90% of patrons are non-Mormons doing surname research.

        LDS - Mormon FHCs - LOCATIONS

        http://www.familysearch.org/Search/searchfhc2.asp

        The LDS-Mormons have filmed the R.C. parish church records (1624-1904)
        for Gnézda, Szepes megye (county, Hungary; later Hniezdne, Slovakia.
        Text in Latin and Hungarian.

        Some abbreviations used for various denominations :
        Hungarian English
        rk.-RK. római katholikus Roman Catholic
        gk. GK. görög katholikus Greek Catholic/Byzantine
        kg. KG. keleti görög Greek Oriental (Eastern Orthodox)
        ag. AG. ágostai Evangelical (Lutheran)
        ref. REF. református Reformed (Calvinist)
        izr. IZR. izraelita Israelite (Jewish)

        (only the film titles are in Slovak)
        In Slovak the matriky (parish church records)
        Krstení = Baptisms (Christenings)
        Sobás^ení = Marriages
        Zomrelí = Deaths


        In Hungarian the matriky are titled anyakönyvek.

        Kereszteltek Anyakönyve = Baptism Records
        Házasultak Anyakönyve = Marriage Records
        Halottak Anyakönyve = Death Records

        In Latin the matriky are titled matricula.
        Matricula Baptisatorum = Baptism Records
        Matricula Copulatorum = Marriage Records
        Matricula Defunctorum = Death Records
      • frankly1us
        Mrs. Schulze I had replied to your surname query on 23 May 2002, but didn t give you the microfilm numbers for Hniezdne (Kniesen) parish church records (at end
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 28, 2002
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          Mrs. Schulze

          I had replied to your surname query on 23 May 2002, but didn't
          give you the microfilm numbers for Hniezdne (Kniesen) parish church
          records (at end of this message)

          Before you travel to Hniezdne next year , do some research of
          your surname's parish church records through local LDS FHC.

          Before WW I, Slovakia was part of Upper Hungary (Felvidék) and
          part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (1867-1918) and earlier a
          part of Hungary under the Austrian Empire.
          Hungarian names were used for towns and counties.

          During 1950-1951, the Communist government of Czechoslovakia had
          all the parish churches send their old matriky (pre-1895 church
          records) to the regional State Archives for safekeeping .
          This was done through local national committees after the church
          registers were declared state property by the government.

          Some parish churches kept duplicate copies of the records.
          Druhopisy (i.e. second writing) was a duplicate copy known as the
          'bishop's copy'. So a duplicate of the original record may have been
          sent elsewhere.
          Some years have both parish records and "bishop's copies". Other
          years
          have only "bishop's copies", others only the parish registers. That
          can explain why a record may not be available at the parish but still
          be available elsewhere.
          From 1828, the parish was obliged to make a copy of entries and
          send them to archives, so some records are preserved in duplicate.

          The LDS-Mormons has filmed all the parish church records at six
          of the seven Slovak State Archives in Slovakia.


          These microfilm reels are available for rental and viewing at any
          Family History Center (FHC) worldwide.
          90% of patrons are non-Mormons doing surname research.

          LDS - Mormon FHCs - LOCATIONS

          http://www.familysearch.org/Search/searchfhc2.asp

          Some abbreviations used for various denominations :
          Hungarian English
          rk.-RK. római katholikus Roman Catholic
          gk. GK. görög katholikus Greek Catholic/Byzantine
          kg. KG. keleti görög Greek Oriental (Eastern Orthodox)
          ag. AG. ágostai Evangelical (Lutheran)
          ref. REF. református Reformed (Calvinist)
          izr. IZR. izraelita Israelite (Jewish)

          In Slovak the matriky (parish church records)
          Krstení = Baptisms (Christenings)
          Sobás^ení = Marriages
          Zomrelí = Deaths


          In Hungarian the matriky are titled anyakönyvek.

          Kereszteltek Anyakönyve = Baptism Records
          Házasultak Anyakönyve = Marriage Records
          Halottak Anyakönyve = Death Records

          In Latin the matriky are titled matricula.

          Matricula Baptisatorum = Baptism Records
          Matricula Copulatorum = Marriage Records
          Matricula Defunctorum = Death Records



          Church Record Translations

          http://www.bmi.net/jjaso//


          Hungarian English Slovak grammatical form
          kis little malá/malé/maly'
          nagy large vel'ká/vel'ké/vel'ky'
          felso" upper horná/horné/horny'
          alsó lower dolná/dolné/dolny'
          felso" upper vys^ná/vys^né/vys^ny'
          alsó lower niz^ná/niz^né/niz^ny'


          The LDS-Mormons have filmed the R.C. parish church records (1624-1904)
          for Gnazdá (also spelled Hniezdne), Slovakia; formerly known as
          Gnézda, Szepes megye (county), Hungary.
          Also spelled Kniesen in German.

          Text in Latin, Hungarian and Slovak.

          film #
          1739195
          1739196
          1739197
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