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Re: [S-R] RE: Lipnica Wielka; and the term Hungarian/Slovak

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  • Wvlyle@aol.com
    Dear Joe: Thanks for the great history lesson. I really need to find a good book on the region. Now, if you or someone else could give me a little more
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 22 3:02 PM
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      Dear Joe:

      Thanks for the great history lesson. I really need to find a good book on
      the region.

      Now, if you or someone else could give me a little more education. When
      someone was said to be SLOVAK in 1902, upon entering the USA, what exactly
      did that mean? Slovakia was formed when? How far back in history does the
      term Slovak go? Even in 1902 they were considered Hungarian?

      Thanks to all of you nice folks...Lyle Corder




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Andrea Vangor
      Theoretically, one was a Hungarian citizen but of a particular ethnicity. Originally the Hungarian Kingdom was designed to include several nationalities.
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 22 4:50 PM
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        Theoretically, one was a Hungarian citizen but
        of a particular ethnicity. Originally the Hungarian Kingdom was designed to
        include several nationalities. This was still true in theory in the late
        19th century but they (the Magyar ethnicity who ran the country) did their
        best to stamp out nationalistic movements among Slovaks, Croats, Romanians,
        etc.

        So our ancestors are usually described, or described themselves, as Slovaks
        and citizens of Hungary. One or two of my relatives called themselves
        Magyar (I am hoping it was an error). Go down the Ellis Island passenger
        lists sometimes and see how this works. People from Hungary might be
        Slovak, Ruthenian, Magyar, Hebrew, "Slavish", Gypsy, whatever.



        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <Wvlyle@...>
        To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, March 22, 2002 3:02 PM
        Subject: Re: [S-R] RE: Lipnica Wielka; and the term Hungarian/Slovak


        > Dear Joe:
        >
        > Thanks for the great history lesson. I really need to find a good book on
        > the region.
        >
        > Now, if you or someone else could give me a little more education. When
        > someone was said to be SLOVAK in 1902, upon entering the USA, what exactly
        > did that mean? Slovakia was formed when? How far back in history does
        the
        > term Slovak go? Even in 1902 they were considered Hungarian?
        >
        > Thanks to all of you nice folks...Lyle Corder
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
      • Andrea Vangor
        P.S. -- we were part of Hungary until after WWI. ... From: Andrea Vangor To: Sent: Friday, March 22, 2002 4:50
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 22 4:56 PM
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          P.S. -- we were part of Hungary until after WWI.

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Andrea Vangor" <drav@...>
          To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Friday, March 22, 2002 4:50 PM
          Subject: Re: [S-R] RE: Lipnica Wielka; and the term Hungarian/Slovak


          > Theoretically, one was a Hungarian citizen but
          > of a particular ethnicity. Originally the Hungarian Kingdom was designed
          to
          > include several nationalities. This was still true in theory in the late
          > 19th century but they (the Magyar ethnicity who ran the country) did their
          > best to stamp out nationalistic movements among Slovaks, Croats,
          Romanians,
          > etc.
          >
          > So our ancestors are usually described, or described themselves, as
          Slovaks
          > and citizens of Hungary. One or two of my relatives called themselves
          > Magyar (I am hoping it was an error). Go down the Ellis Island passenger
          > lists sometimes and see how this works. People from Hungary might be
          > Slovak, Ruthenian, Magyar, Hebrew, "Slavish", Gypsy, whatever.
          >
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: <Wvlyle@...>
          > To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2002 3:02 PM
          > Subject: Re: [S-R] RE: Lipnica Wielka; and the term Hungarian/Slovak
          >
          >
          > > Dear Joe:
          > >
          > > Thanks for the great history lesson. I really need to find a good book
          on
          > > the region.
          > >
          > > Now, if you or someone else could give me a little more education. When
          > > someone was said to be SLOVAK in 1902, upon entering the USA, what
          exactly
          > > did that mean? Slovakia was formed when? How far back in history
          does
          > the
          > > term Slovak go? Even in 1902 they were considered Hungarian?
          > >
          > > Thanks to all of you nice folks...Lyle Corder
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
          >
        • EMSCRS@aol.com
          Slovakia has only been called a place since 1849. There is a book called A History of Slovakia by Stanislav J. Kirschbaum which is quite informative. Slovak
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 22 7:08 PM
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            Slovakia has only been called a place since 1849. There is a book called "A
            History of Slovakia" by Stanislav J. Kirschbaum which is quite informative.
            Slovak in 1902 woulld be considered an ethnic background, rather than a
            nationality. At that time, it was still part of the Austro=Hungarian Empire,
            as nearly as I can figure out, and on immigration records would probably (as
            mine were) called Hungarian. Elizabeth
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