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Re: [S-R] Surnames

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  • John M.
    ... There are 4 C^ejka (Chejka) listed in Kos^ice, 4 in Bratislava, 1 in Trencin, 1 in Zilina. http://www.zoznamst.sk/sk/index.html John
    Message 1 of 25 , Mar 21, 2002
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      At 02:41 PM 3/21/02 +0000, you wrote:
      >My family name is Csejka, which is a Hungarian variant spelling of
      >Cejka. I cannot find anyone related to me except the people I
      >already knew about, most of whom are deceased. Anyone looking for
      >this connection?

      There are 4 C^ejka (Chejka) listed in Kos^ice, 4 in Bratislava, 1 in
      Trencin, 1 in Zilina.

      http://www.zoznamst.sk/sk/index.html

      John
    • EMSCRS@aol.com
      Thank you - I ll look iinto them. Mine came here in 1903, so finding connections still in Europe is a long shot, as I doubt anyone would remember them. Three
      Message 2 of 25 , Mar 22, 2002
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        Thank you - I'll look iinto them. Mine came here in 1903, so finding
        connections still in Europe is a long shot, as I doubt anyone would remember
        them. Three generations of the family came at more or less the same time,
        which makes me wonder if they even left anyone behind. Elizabeth
      • edmaul
        June 24, 1998 Susan Jozefek , Michigan (Vrbovce) My father, John Jozefek, had a brother, Martin Jozefek, and a sister, Anna Skok. Martin Jozefek s first wife s
        Message 3 of 25 , Mar 12, 2003
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          June 24, 1998 Susan Jozefek , Michigan

          (Vrbovce)



          My father, John Jozefek, had a brother, Martin Jozefek, and a sister, Anna Skok. Martin Jozefek's first wife's name was Anna Melicharek. She died. His second wife's name was Kristina Bedndrova (born Mareckova). married Martin Jozefek. She died also.

          She was a widow when she

          Martin Jozefek (who died about 1972) had 3 daughters: Anna Plesa, Susie Zona and Kristina Mareckova. Susie Zona and Kristina Mareckova are both deceased. Anna Plesa is presently in a Nursing Home in Massachusetts. Her daughter, Betty, who is married, lives there and can visit her at the Nursing Home. Anna Plesa has another daughter, Susie Plesa, who is Assistant Superintendent of a school in England.

          Susie Zona had a daughter, Lillian, who is now deceased, and a son, John. They lived in Albany, New York.

          Kristina Mareckova lived in Vrbovce. She died on August 4, 1997. Her children are as follows: Anna Melicharkova, Alzbeta Navratilova, Zuzana Hyzova and John Marecek.

          Anna Melicharkova lives in Vrbovce with her husband Pavol Melicharek. Anna

          Their Melicharkova has a daughter, Anna, who is married to Pavol Sukupcak. children are Miroslava and Radko.

          Alzbeta Navratilova lives in Myjava with her husband, Juraj Navratil and their son, Peter Navratil.

          She had two children with her first husband, Pavol Filus, as follows:

          Danka Filusova who is married to Martin Tomes. They have 2 sons, Martin and Lubo s .

          Pavol Filus who married Katarina. They have a son, Patrik.

          Zuzana Hyzova lives with her husband, John Hyza. She has 2 sons: Paul Hyza (wife Monika) They do not have any children. John Hyza (wife Olga)

          They have a daughter, Linda. They live in Vrbovce.

          John Marecek lives near Vrbovce with his wife Lidka. They have 2 children living at home: a daughter, Lidka and a son, Jaroslav.

          John Marecek also has a son, John Marecek, who is married to Vladimira. They have a son, John.

          My father's sister, Anna Skok (who died in1970) had a daughter, Alzbeta

          ~dslna. ~ne lives in Vrbovce with her daughter, Anna Zlochova and her husband,

          Martin Zloch. Martin Zloch's mother passed away suddenly in October of 1997.

          She was 70 years old.

          Anna Zlochova has a daughter, Janka, who is married to Lubomir Havel. She is a teacher at the school in Vrbovce. They live in Vrbovce.

          They have a 5 year old daughter, Lucinka.

          Anna Zlochova has a son, Zdenko, who is married to Slavka Kadlecikova. He is a police Officer. They have a son, Martin, who is about 9 months old. They live in Nitra, Slovakia.



          Ed, Pleasantville, New York


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ed Maul
          Researching: Filus, Jancar, Jozefek/Josefek, Nochta, Places: Vrbovce, Slovakia Straznice, Moravia, Czech Ed, Pleasntville, New York [Non-text portions of this
          Message 4 of 25 , Sep 19, 2003
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            Researching:

            Filus, Jancar, Jozefek/Josefek, Nochta,

            Places:
            Vrbovce, Slovakia
            Straznice, Moravia, Czech

            Ed, Pleasntville, New York


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • bucyrus92504
            Hello to All I am new to the group but will help with what I may know. I am researching surnames: Safigan, Macenko and Vuletic. I certainly would appreciate
            Message 5 of 25 , Sep 24, 2003
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              Hello to All
              I am new to the group but will help with what I may know. I am
              researching surnames: Safigan, Macenko and Vuletic. I certainly would
              appreciate any info and will direct questions to the group the more I
              dive into the geneology of my Slovakian heritage. Thanks in advance
              for your help. Virginia
            • Frank
              ... would ... I ... Hello Virginia Are you new to posting to other groups as well ? your Slovakian heritage ? What language(s) did your surnames speak and what
              Message 6 of 25 , Sep 24, 2003
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                --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "bucyrus92504"
                <bucyrus92504@y...> wrote:
                > Hello to All
                > I am new to the group but will help with what I may know. I am
                > researching surnames: Safigan, Macenko and Vuletic. I certainly
                would
                > appreciate any info and will direct questions to the group the more
                I
                > dive into the geneology of my Slovakian heritage. Thanks in advance
                > for your help. Virginia


                Hello Virginia

                Are you new to posting to other groups as well ?

                your Slovakian heritage ?

                What language(s) did your surnames speak and what was their religion ?

                How are you ? English

                Wie geht es Ihnen ? German

                Hogy Van ? Hungarian

                Ako sa más^ ? Slovak

                Jak se máte ? Czech

                Jak sie masz ? Polish

                Kako ste ? Croatian/Slovene

                159 surnames Vuletic' who emigrated to the US were from Croatia
                (once part of former Yugoslavia)
                They bore Croatian first names and Vuletic' is a Croatian
                surname.

                The surname Macenko was from Austria-Poland and Galicia, and
                also Stráz^ske (Sk) O"rmezo" (H), Slovakia.

                Perhaps Slovak or Ruthenian or Polish ethnicity ?

                And the surname Safigan/Savigan/Safijan does not look very Slovak ?

                Frank K
              • Jean & Harry Helbrecht
                Dear Valdamir, Thank you, for your great offer. I have a surname puzzle that you that you may be able to help me clear up. Same family three surnames Czuna,
                Message 7 of 25 , Apr 30 3:06 PM
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                  Dear Valdamir,
                  Thank you, for your great offer. I have a surname puzzle that you that
                  you may be able to help me clear up.
                  Same family three surnames Czuna, Cuna, and Kuka
                  Thank you
                  regards
                  Jean
                • Vladimir Bohinc
                  Dear Jean, Since we are by the names, my name is Vladimir , not Valdamir. It is not the same, how you spell a name. I checked, but none of the names you gave
                  Message 8 of 25 , May 1, 2004
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                    Dear Jean,
                    Since we are by the names, my name is Vladimir , not Valdamir. It is not the same, how you spell a name.
                    I checked, but none of the names you gave are there.
                    Maybe Kuka is related to Kukan.
                    Vladimir

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Jean & Harry Helbrecht
                    To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2004 12:06 AM
                    Subject: [S-R] Surnames


                    Dear Valdamir,
                    Thank you, for your great offer. I have a surname puzzle that you that
                    you may be able to help me clear up.
                    Same family three surnames Czuna, Cuna, and Kuka
                    Thank you
                    regards
                    Jean




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                  • Kelly
                    Dear Vladimir, Do you have the surname Gyurkovics anywhere in your book. Kelly Gyurkovits
                    Message 9 of 25 , May 2, 2004
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                      Dear Vladimir,

                      Do you have the surname Gyurkovics anywhere in your book.

                      Kelly Gyurkovits
                    • n8de@thepoint.net
                      Kelly, Surely your surname GYURKOVITS is related to my great-grandmother s surname of DURDOVIC .. in Hungarian it s GYORGYOVICS. Don Havlicek Connersville, IN
                      Message 10 of 25 , May 2, 2004
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                        Kelly,
                        Surely your surname GYURKOVITS is related to my great-grandmother's
                        surname of DURDOVIC .. in Hungarian it's GYORGYOVICS.
                        Don Havlicek
                        Connersville, IN

                        > Dear Vladimir,
                        >
                        > Do you have the surname Gyurkovics anywhere in your book.
                        >
                        > Kelly Gyurkovits
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                        > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
                        > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • GRETCHEN HERROCK
                        Would that also be Georgovich or something of the sort in English? My grandfather was named Gyurka or George ...just a thought. ... From:
                        Message 11 of 25 , May 2, 2004
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                          Would that also be "Georgovich" or something of the sort in English? My
                          grandfather was named Gyurka or "George"...just a thought.

                          -------Original Message-------

                          From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: 05/02/04 17:18:57
                          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [S-R] Surnames

                          Kelly,
                          Surely your surname GYURKOVITS is related to my great-grandmother's
                          surname of DURDOVIC .. in Hungarian it's GYORGYOVICS.
                          Don Havlicek
                          Connersville, IN

                          > Dear Vladimir,
                          >
                          > Do you have the surname Gyurkovics anywhere in your book.
                          >
                          > Kelly Gyurkovits
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                          > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
                          > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >



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                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Vladimir Bohinc
                          Dear Kelly, there are very many variations to this theme. They all have root in the slavic name Juraj, who is a synonim for spring. Vladimir ... From:
                          Message 12 of 25 , May 3, 2004
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                            Dear Kelly,
                            there are very many variations to this theme. They all have root in the slavic name Juraj, who is a synonim for spring.
                            Vladimir

                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: n8de@...
                            To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Sunday, May 02, 2004 11:18 PM
                            Subject: Re: [S-R] Surnames


                            Kelly,
                            Surely your surname GYURKOVITS is related to my great-grandmother's
                            surname of DURDOVIC .. in Hungarian it's GYORGYOVICS.
                            Don Havlicek
                            Connersville, IN

                            > Dear Vladimir,
                            >
                            > Do you have the surname Gyurkovics anywhere in your book.
                            >
                            > Kelly Gyurkovits
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                            > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
                            > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >



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                            ADVERTISEMENT





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                            Tato sprava bola preverena antivirusovym systemom NOD32.
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                          • Fran
                            searching for Surnames Kumer and Petyak
                            Message 13 of 25 , Jan 14, 2007
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                              searching for Surnames Kumer and Petyak
                            • johnqadam
                              ... When searching for genealogical information, knowing the birth village is paramount because records are organized by village not nationally, so it is not
                              Message 14 of 25 , Jan 14, 2007
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                                >>> searching for Surnames Kumer and Petyak <<<

                                When searching for genealogical information, knowing the birth village
                                is paramount because records are organized by village not nationally,
                                so it is not possible to search on a national basis. It is also
                                necessary to know the religion.
                              • Paul Guzowski
                                Fran et al, I m new to this group, am no expert, and have only just started researching my own heritage on my dad s side which is Polish. I have encountered
                                Message 15 of 25 , Jan 15, 2007
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                                  Fran et al,
                                  I'm new to this group, am no expert, and have only just started researching
                                  my own heritage on my dad's side which is Polish. I have encountered some of
                                  the same problems you have in trying to trace my roots. I am living and
                                  working in Central/Eastern Europe for over five years now and have been in
                                  Bratislava, Slovakia, since November 2005 so offer a couple of observations
                                  that may be of assistance.
                                  First, if you knew when your grandfather immigrated to the US it would be a
                                  big help. The borders in this part of Europe changed drastically after WWI
                                  with the June 1920 Treaty of Trianon, the treaty that dissolved the Kingdom
                                  of Hungary of which present-day Slovakia was a part. You can find more
                                  detail here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Trianon . The Czechs
                                  declared their independence on 28 October 1918 and the Slovaks joined them
                                  two days later forming the first Republic of Czechoslovakia. My reading of
                                  Slovak history doesn't indicate much migration away from the family's
                                  original seat during those days. However, it is entirely possible that
                                  either or both of them originally came from what is the northern part of
                                  modern-day Hungary or the eastern part of the modern Czech Republic (e.g.
                                  Moravia).
                                  Secondly, both family and given names can present a problem. My grandfather
                                  changed his name from Franciszek to Frank to ease pronunciation for Americans
                                  and to avoid highlighting himself. I found a table comparing English,
                                  German, and Polish given names that helped me a lot here:
                                  http://www.sggee.org/AlternateChristianNames.pdf. Maybe something similar
                                  exists for Slovak given names. In any case, I'd be willing to wager a mug of
                                  Zlaty Bazant beer that his given name was František, which is very common
                                  here.
                                  Family names can be problematic, too. Most Slavic languages differentiate
                                  between male and female with an ending on the family name. For example, my
                                  grandmother was Stanislawa Jasinska in Poland but in the US it became
                                  Jasinski, just as it did for her mother. In Slovak, all female family names
                                  (at least all that I have encountered) end in 'ova' hence your grandmother's
                                  family name would have been Petyakova as would her mother's.
                                  There are two other nuances to be aware of concerning names. First, while
                                  Czech family names present no problem for Slovaks except for a few minor
                                  differences in pronunciation due to slightly different alphabets, Hungarian
                                  names are another story. For one thing, in Hungarian the family name is
                                  given first followed by the given name. Also, there are some family names
                                  (mostly stemming from trades like smith, tailor, etc) which exist in both
                                  languages and are even pronounced the same but are spelled differently due to
                                  the different alphabets. To add to the confusion, towns and cities in public
                                  records could have different names or spellings depending on which country
                                  they were a part of at the time. For example, Bratislava was Pressburg to
                                  the Austrians and Pozsony to the Hungarians.
                                  That said Petyak does sound Slavic to me, lots of Petyaks show up in PA when
                                  doing a Google search, and lots of Slovaks emigrated to PA. Kumer sounds
                                  German. Germans established the mining industry in central Slovakia so your
                                  grandfather's heritage could have been German but I have also found reference
                                  to it as a Slovene name in some genealogy resources.
                                  In sum, knowing the precise date of your grandparents' arrival in the US and
                                  their names in Slovak would probably help immensely in unraveling the
                                  mystery. As a postscript, I'm reading a book now called "Polish Roots" by
                                  Maryanne Chorzempa that has lots of great information about genealogy
                                  research in this part of Europe, including some Slovak references. You may
                                  want to see if your library has a copy. As I said, I'm no expert but hope
                                  these few insights might help.

                                  Good Luck!

                                  Paul
                                • Bill Tarkulich
                                  Great comments Paul. Welcome to the group. You ve framed things very succinctly, I am sure your knowledge will help others. Thanks, Bill ... From: Paul
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Jan 15, 2007
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                                    Great comments Paul. Welcome to the group.
                                    You've framed things very succinctly, I am sure your knowledge will help
                                    others.
                                    Thanks,


                                    Bill


                                    -----Original Message-----
                                    From: Paul Guzowski [mailto:pauguz@...]
                                    Sent: Monday, January 15, 2007 9:02 AM
                                    To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: [S-R] Re: Surnames

                                    Fran et al,
                                    I'm new to this group, am no expert, and have only just started
                                    researching
                                    my own heritage on my dad's side which is Polish. I have encountered some
                                    of
                                    the same problems you have in trying to trace my roots. I am living and
                                    working in Central/Eastern Europe for over five years now and have been in
                                    Bratislava, Slovakia, since November 2005 so offer a couple of observations
                                    that may be of assistance.
                                    First, if you knew when your grandfather immigrated to the US it
                                    would be a
                                    big help. The borders in this part of Europe changed drastically after WWI
                                    with the June 1920 Treaty of Trianon, the treaty that dissolved the Kingdom
                                    of Hungary of which present-day Slovakia was a part. You can find more
                                    detail here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Trianon . The Czechs
                                    declared their independence on 28 October 1918 and the Slovaks joined them
                                    two days later forming the first Republic of Czechoslovakia. My reading of
                                    Slovak history doesn't indicate much migration away from the family's
                                    original seat during those days. However, it is entirely possible that
                                    either or both of them originally came from what is the northern part of
                                    modern-day Hungary or the eastern part of the modern Czech Republic (e.g.
                                    Moravia).
                                    Secondly, both family and given names can present a problem. My
                                    grandfather
                                    changed his name from Franciszek to Frank to ease pronunciation for
                                    Americans
                                    and to avoid highlighting himself. I found a table comparing English,
                                    German, and Polish given names that helped me a lot here:
                                    http://www.sggee.org/AlternateChristianNames.pdf. Maybe something similar
                                    exists for Slovak given names. In any case, I'd be willing to wager a mug
                                    of
                                    Zlaty Bazant beer that his given name was František, which is very common
                                    here.
                                    Family names can be problematic, too. Most Slavic languages
                                    differentiate
                                    between male and female with an ending on the family name. For example, my
                                    grandmother was Stanislawa Jasinska in Poland but in the US it became
                                    Jasinski, just as it did for her mother. In Slovak, all female family names

                                    (at least all that I have encountered) end in 'ova' hence your grandmother's

                                    family name would have been Petyakova as would her mother's.
                                    There are two other nuances to be aware of concerning names. First,
                                    while
                                    Czech family names present no problem for Slovaks except for a few minor
                                    differences in pronunciation due to slightly different alphabets, Hungarian
                                    names are another story. For one thing, in Hungarian the family name is
                                    given first followed by the given name. Also, there are some family names
                                    (mostly stemming from trades like smith, tailor, etc) which exist in both
                                    languages and are even pronounced the same but are spelled differently due
                                    to
                                    the different alphabets. To add to the confusion, towns and cities in
                                    public
                                    records could have different names or spellings depending on which country
                                    they were a part of at the time. For example, Bratislava was Pressburg to
                                    the Austrians and Pozsony to the Hungarians.
                                    That said Petyak does sound Slavic to me, lots of Petyaks show up in
                                    PA when
                                    doing a Google search, and lots of Slovaks emigrated to PA. Kumer sounds
                                    German. Germans established the mining industry in central Slovakia so your

                                    grandfather's heritage could have been German but I have also found
                                    reference
                                    to it as a Slovene name in some genealogy resources.
                                    In sum, knowing the precise date of your grandparents' arrival in
                                    the US and
                                    their names in Slovak would probably help immensely in unraveling the
                                    mystery. As a postscript, I'm reading a book now called "Polish Roots" by
                                    Maryanne Chorzempa that has lots of great information about genealogy
                                    research in this part of Europe, including some Slovak references. You may
                                    want to see if your library has a copy. As I said, I'm no expert but hope
                                    these few insights might help.

                                    Good Luck!

                                    Paul



                                    To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                                    http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
                                    SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
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                                  • Vladimir Bohinc
                                    Dear Paul, Slovak ova endings have officially been introduced after the WW1, because they were dictated by the Czechs. You can find them in church records
                                    Message 17 of 25 , Jan 15, 2007
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                                      Dear Paul,
                                      Slovak "ova"endings have officially been introduced after the WW1, because they were dictated by the Czechs. You can find them in church records before that time only sporadically.
                                      Since I am Slovene, I would bet, Kumer is slovenian. I mean "that"Kumer. The surname is in any case.
                                      Regards,
                                      Vladimir

                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      From: Paul Guzowski
                                      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Monday, January 15, 2007 3:02 PM
                                      Subject: [S-R] Re: Surnames


                                      Fran et al,
                                      I'm new to this group, am no expert, and have only just started researching
                                      my own heritage on my dad's side which is Polish. I have encountered some of
                                      the same problems you have in trying to trace my roots. I am living and
                                      working in Central/Eastern Europe for over five years now and have been in
                                      Bratislava, Slovakia, since November 2005 so offer a couple of observations
                                      that may be of assistance.
                                      First, if you knew when your grandfather immigrated to the US it would be a
                                      big help. The borders in this part of Europe changed drastically after WWI
                                      with the June 1920 Treaty of Trianon, the treaty that dissolved the Kingdom
                                      of Hungary of which present-day Slovakia was a part. You can find more
                                      detail here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Trianon . The Czechs
                                      declared their independence on 28 October 1918 and the Slovaks joined them
                                      two days later forming the first Republic of Czechoslovakia. My reading of
                                      Slovak history doesn't indicate much migration away from the family's
                                      original seat during those days. However, it is entirely possible that
                                      either or both of them originally came from what is the northern part of
                                      modern-day Hungary or the eastern part of the modern Czech Republic (e.g.
                                      Moravia).
                                      Secondly, both family and given names can present a problem. My grandfather
                                      changed his name from Franciszek to Frank to ease pronunciation for Americans
                                      and to avoid highlighting himself. I found a table comparing English,
                                      German, and Polish given names that helped me a lot here:
                                      http://www.sggee.org/AlternateChristianNames.pdf. Maybe something similar
                                      exists for Slovak given names. In any case, I'd be willing to wager a mug of
                                      Zlaty Bazant beer that his given name was František, which is very common
                                      here.
                                      Family names can be problematic, too. Most Slavic languages differentiate
                                      between male and female with an ending on the family name. For example, my
                                      grandmother was Stanislawa Jasinska in Poland but in the US it became
                                      Jasinski, just as it did for her mother. In Slovak, all female family names
                                      (at least all that I have encountered) end in 'ova' hence your grandmother's
                                      family name would have been Petyakova as would her mother's.
                                      There are two other nuances to be aware of concerning names. First, while
                                      Czech family names present no problem for Slovaks except for a few minor
                                      differences in pronunciation due to slightly different alphabets, Hungarian
                                      names are another story. For one thing, in Hungarian the family name is
                                      given first followed by the given name. Also, there are some family names
                                      (mostly stemming from trades like smith, tailor, etc) which exist in both
                                      languages and are even pronounced the same but are spelled differently due to
                                      the different alphabets. To add to the confusion, towns and cities in public
                                      records could have different names or spellings depending on which country
                                      they were a part of at the time. For example, Bratislava was Pressburg to
                                      the Austrians and Pozsony to the Hungarians.
                                      That said Petyak does sound Slavic to me, lots of Petyaks show up in PA when
                                      doing a Google search, and lots of Slovaks emigrated to PA. Kumer sounds
                                      German. Germans established the mining industry in central Slovakia so your
                                      grandfather's heritage could have been German but I have also found reference
                                      to it as a Slovene name in some genealogy resources.
                                      In sum, knowing the precise date of your grandparents' arrival in the US and
                                      their names in Slovak would probably help immensely in unraveling the
                                      mystery. As a postscript, I'm reading a book now called "Polish Roots" by
                                      Maryanne Chorzempa that has lots of great information about genealogy
                                      research in this part of Europe, including some Slovak references. You may
                                      want to see if your library has a copy. As I said, I'm no expert but hope
                                      these few insights might help.

                                      Good Luck!

                                      Paul





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