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Arranged marriages

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  • mavrik375
    Does anyone know how common arranged marriages were in the Slovak communities in the U.S? My family has recently begun to seriously gather genealogy
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 16, 2002
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      Does anyone know how common arranged marriages were in the Slovak
      communities in the U.S? My family has recently begun to seriously
      gather genealogy information from my mother's side of the family.
      For example, my great-grandfather came to the U.S at the age of 18 to
      the port of New York from the Austria-Hungarian empire via
      Bremerhaven in 1878, according to his last living child (90 yrs. old
      now). My great-grandmother arrived in Baltimore, also from Austria-
      Hungary, in 1891. Yet, they were supposedly married on 02/15/1891,
      leading the family to conclude that somehow it was perhaps an
      arranged marriage. My great-grandfather was 13 yrs older than his
      bride. However, that marriage date needs to be confirmed as exact,
      but we think it is almost certainly correct. We don't have the
      marriage certificate nor the exact dates of their arrivals into the
      U.S., nor the names of their ships of passage.

      If the names of the villages of their birthplaces are correct, they
      were about about 15 miles apart back in the Old Country. Andrew
      Yuhas (Giraltovce (Slovak)/Radoma (Hungarian), per baptismal
      certificate recieved in 1935. Maria Kolesar (Tulcik
      (Slovak)/Toltszek (Hungarian). Tulcik may not be the actual
      birthplace of my great-grandmother. She had a brother, John, that
      returned to the Old Country. We have several letters of
      correspondence a number of years later between her and her brother's
      daughter (Anna Kolesar Mackova), who was in Tulcik.

      Surnames researched: YUHAS (JUHAS/JUHASZ), KOLESAR
    • Milan Huba
      Apparently arranged marriages were not that uncommon. My maternal grandparents, who happened to be second cousins, marriage was arranged by their respective
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 17, 2002
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        Apparently arranged marriages were not that uncommon. My maternal
        grandparents, who happened to be second cousins, marriage was arranged by
        their respective parents. According to the story that came down from both my
        aunt and mother, my grandfather was an officer in the Hungarian army and was
        living away from home with his mistress by whom he had a daughter. In 1904,
        he was summoned home by his parents and when he arrived he was told that he
        was going to marry a younger cousin who he hardly knew. Neither of my
        grandparents wanted to marry, my grandfather was already enjoying a liaison
        and my grandmother just didn’t want to get married. Later in life, my
        grandmother said on several occasions that she was forced to marry against
        her will.

        Apparently the marriage was arranged because of property consideration and a
        lawsuit that was initiated against a third party. Somehow, the marriage was
        supposed to be able to strengten their claim in the lawsuit. The marriage
        lasted 52 years, until my grandmother died in 1956 My grandfather died a
        year later. During their marriage together they produced 11 children, not
        counting at least one produced with a another person outside of the
        marriage.

        -----Original Message-----
        From: mavrik375 [mailto:mavrik375@...]
        Sent: Saturday, February 16, 2002 7:50 PM
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [S-R] Arranged marriages


        Does anyone know how common arranged marriages were in the Slovak
        communities in the U.S? My family has recently begun to seriously
        gather genealogy information from my mother's side of the family.
        For example, my great-grandfather came to the U.S at the age of 18 to
        the port of New York from the Austria-Hungarian empire via
        Bremerhaven in 1878, according to his last living child (90 yrs. old
        now). My great-grandmother arrived in Baltimore, also from Austria-
        Hungary, in 1891. Yet, they were supposedly married on 02/15/1891,
        leading the family to conclude that somehow it was perhaps an
        arranged marriage. My great-grandfather was 13 yrs older than his
        bride. However, that marriage date needs to be confirmed as exact,
        but we think it is almost certainly correct. We don't have the
        marriage certificate nor the exact dates of their arrivals into the
        U.S., nor the names of their ships of passage.

        If the names of the villages of their birthplaces are correct, they
        were about about 15 miles apart back in the Old Country. Andrew
        Yuhas (Giraltovce (Slovak)/Radoma (Hungarian), per baptismal
        certificate recieved in 1935. Maria Kolesar (Tulcik
        (Slovak)/Toltszek (Hungarian). Tulcik may not be the actual
        birthplace of my great-grandmother. She had a brother, John, that
        returned to the Old Country. We have several letters of
        correspondence a number of years later between her and her brother's
        daughter (Anna Kolesar Mackova), who was in Tulcik.

        Surnames researched: YUHAS (JUHAS/JUHASZ), KOLESAR





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      • Dolores Glade
        ... Don t know if this info helps any since I don t know the name of the village they came from but my great-parents, John and Mary Baran came from the
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 18, 2002
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          --- mavrik375 <mavrik375@...> wrote:
          > Does anyone know how common arranged marriages were
          > in the Slovak
          > communities in the U.S? My family has recently
          > begun to seriously
          > gather genealogy information from my mother's side
          > of the family.
          > For example, my great-grandfather came to the U.S at
          > the age of 18 to
          > the port of New York from the Austria-Hungarian
          > empire via
          > Bremerhaven in 1878, according to his last living
          > child (90 yrs. old
          > now). My great-grandmother arrived in Baltimore,
          > also from Austria-
          > Hungary, in 1891. Yet, they were supposedly married
          > on 02/15/1891,
          > leading the family to conclude that somehow it was
          > perhaps an
          > arranged marriage. My great-grandfather was 13 yrs
          > older than his
          > bride. However, that marriage date needs to be
          > confirmed as exact,
          > but we think it is almost certainly correct. We
          > don't have the
          > marriage certificate nor the exact dates of their
          > arrivals into the
          > U.S., nor the names of their ships of passage.
          >
          > If the names of the villages of their birthplaces
          > are correct, they
          > were about about 15 miles apart back in the Old
          > Country. Andrew
          > Yuhas (Giraltovce (Slovak)/Radoma (Hungarian), per
          > baptismal
          > certificate recieved in 1935. Maria Kolesar (Tulcik
          >
          > (Slovak)/Toltszek (Hungarian). Tulcik may not be
          > the actual
          > birthplace of my great-grandmother. She had a
          > brother, John, that
          > returned to the Old Country. We have several
          > letters of
          > correspondence a number of years later between her
          > and her brother's
          > daughter (Anna Kolesar Mackova), who was in Tulcik.
          >
          > Surnames researched: YUHAS (JUHAS/JUHASZ), KOLESAR
          >
          >Mavrik--

          Don't know if this info helps any since I don't know
          the name of the village they came from but my
          great-parents, John and Mary Baran came from the
          Austrian Hungarian Empire and had a daughter,
          Elizabeth (in Bayonne, NJ) who married a man named
          John Yuhas. Maybe there is a connection.

          Dee


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        • frankly1us
          When you speak of arranged marriages you are referring to those planned family marriages that occurred in Europe. Most emigrants had settled in areas and towns
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 18, 2002
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            When you speak of arranged marriages you are referring to those
            planned family marriages that occurred in Europe.

            Most emigrants had settled in areas and towns in the U.S. where their
            relatives or sponsors were already resident and established and working.

            Mail order brides from the old country were a way of life, not only
            for Slavic emigrants, but wherever there was a shortage of marriageable women.

            When the bride-to-be arrived in the U.S., she might meet or have
            met someone else on ship, who appealed to her more than her intended
            groom.
            In which case, the 'new' prospective groom owed the other intended
            bridegroom or her sponsor the cost of brides's voyage to the U.S.

            And at Ellis Island dentention quarters unmarried young women
            could not leave immigration station unless accompanied by a male relative or spouse.
            In some cases, the intended groom traveled there so the woman
            could leave detention (as his wife)

            Child brides ?
            While working with U.S. Census enumeration microfilms I noted
            that a younger man sometimes married a much older widow with
            children if her husband had died suddenly, say in a mining
            accident.
            Sometimes the children were nearly as old as the their new father.
            These weren't love matches either.
          • mavrik375
            ... Dee Dee I don t know if there is a connection here or not. I have an uncle named John Yuhas that is married to a Betty (Elizabeth?). Unfortunately, I
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 21, 2002
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              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., Dolores Glade <dtglade@y...> wrote:

              > Don't know if this info helps any since I don't know
              > the name of the village they came from but my
              > great-parents, John and Mary Baran came from the
              > Austrian Hungarian Empire and had a daughter,
              > Elizabeth (in Bayonne, NJ) who married a man named
              > John Yuhas. Maybe there is a connection.
              >
              Dee


              Dee

              I don't know if there is a connection here or not. I have an uncle
              named John Yuhas that is married to a "Betty" (Elizabeth?).
              Unfortunately, I don't know at this time what her maiden name is. My
              research is currently centered on my great-grandfather Andrew Yuhas
              (Juhas). I am unaware at this time if he had any siblings. It was
              said he was orphaned before he emigrated to America around 1880. It
              is looking like the only way that I'll be able to find any of Andrew
              siblings (if there were any) is by researching the LDS microfilms of
              the parish from his birthplace, Giraltovce.

              Mavrik
            • frankly1us
              ... LDS filmed the parish church records for Giraltovce (Sk) Girált (H) Lutheran 1828-1895 G.C. 1862-1933 listed under Kobylnice R.C. 1840-1898 listed under
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 22, 2002
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                --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., "mavrik375" <mavrik375@a...> wrote:
                > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., Dolores Glade <dtglade@y...> wrote:
                >
                > > Don't know if this info helps any since I don't know
                > > the name of the village they came from but my
                > > great-parents, John and Mary Baran came from the
                > > Austrian Hungarian Empire and had a daughter,
                > > Elizabeth (in Bayonne, NJ) who married a man named
                > > John Yuhas. Maybe there is a connection.
                > >
                > Dee
                >
                >
                > Dee
                >
                > I don't know if there is a connection here or not. I have an uncle
                > named John Yuhas that is married to a "Betty" (Elizabeth?).
                > Unfortunately, I don't know at this time what her maiden name is. My
                > research is currently centered on my great-grandfather Andrew Yuhas
                > (Juhas). I am unaware at this time if he had any siblings. It was
                > said he was orphaned before he emigrated to America around 1880. It
                > is looking like the only way that I'll be able to find any of Andrew
                > siblings (if there were any) is by researching the LDS microfilms of
                > the parish from his birthplace, Giraltovce.
                >
                > Mavrik

                LDS filmed the parish church records for Giraltovce (Sk) Girált (H)

                Lutheran
                1828-1895

                G.C.
                1862-1933
                listed under Kobylnice

                R.C.
                1840-1898
                listed under Brezov
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