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Padina area families--Babuchna, Durgala, Dubovski +

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  • savedbygrace1996
    Hello. I just discovered this message group and thought I d give it a try. My great-grandfather came to the U.S. shortly after the turn of the century. His
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 28, 2001
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      Hello. I just discovered this message group and thought I'd give it
      a try. My great-grandfather came to the U.S. shortly after the turn
      of the century. His wife and first two children followed shortly
      afterwards, one of which was my grandfather. My great-grandfather's
      name was Mihaly Babuchna and he was born in Padina. His father's
      name was also Mihaly and his mother's name was Jula ?Najarova(I'm
      very unsure of the spelling). Mihaly married Mary Dubovski(spelling
      also questionable here)who was the daughter of George Dubovski and
      Susie Geeska(? Sp) Family connections also included the name
      Durgala. Does anyone have any connections to any of these families?
      Also is there anyone who can translate the inscriptions on the back
      of my old photos?
    • John
      ... I was unable to locate a Padina in Slovakia. There is a town called Padan about 30 miles east of Bratisalva. I found a Klarisa Babuchnová in Bratislava
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 28, 2001
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        At 05:30 AM 12/29/01 +0000, you wrote:
        >Hello. I just discovered this message group and thought I'd give it
        >a try. My great-grandfather came to the U.S. shortly after the turn
        >of the century. His wife and first two children followed shortly
        >afterwards, one of which was my grandfather. My great-grandfather's
        >name was Mihaly Babuchna and he was born in Padina.

        I was unable to locate a Padina in Slovakia. There is a town called Padan
        about 30 miles east of Bratisalva. I found a Klarisa Babuchnová in
        Bratislava using the Slovak online phone directory.


        >Also is there anyone who can translate the inscriptions on the back of my
        >old photos?

        You can post the inscriptions to the list or, if you choose, you can
        contact me privately. I'll give it a try. There are other list members
        that are fluent in the language.

        John



        >
        >
        >
        >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      • savedbygrace1996
        Thanks for your response John. I found Padina in one of those traveler guides. The map shows it just a little northeast of Beograd. When my
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 29, 2001
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          Thanks for your response John. I found Padina in one of those
          traveler guides. The map shows it just a little northeast of
          Beograd. When my great-grandparents came over their place of
          residence was given as Lajosfalva.

          I've never seen "Babuchnova". That's very interesting. We're not
          really sure of the name origin although some of the family believed
          it to be Russian. I've also seen it spelled Bubuchna.

          I'll post my "to be translated's" in a separate post to the web.

          Thanks again,
          Tracy
        • John
          ... This would place your g-gparents in Serbia which is now Yugoslavia. Beograd is Belgrade. Lajosfalva is a Hungarian name I believe. What now is Slovakia
          Message 4 of 9 , Dec 29, 2001
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            At 01:31 PM 12/29/01 +0000, you wrote:
            >Thanks for your response John. I found Padina in one of those
            >traveler guides. The map shows it just a little northeast of
            >Beograd. When my great-grandparents came over their place of
            >residence was given as Lajosfalva.

            This would place your g-gparents in Serbia which is now
            Yugoslavia. Beograd is Belgrade. Lajosfalva is a Hungarian name I
            believe. What now is Slovakia was part of Upper Hungary until 1918. There
            was a town called Lajosfalva in Slovakia. It is now known as Ludovitova
            and is located a few miles north of Nitra in Western Slovakia.

            >I've never seen "Babuchnova". That's very interesting. We're not
            >really sure of the name origin although some of the family believed
            >it to be Russian. I've also seen it spelled Bubuchna.

            The "ova" ending is the feminine ending for many Slavic names. I believe
            the male family name would be Babuchna.

            John
          • frankly1us
            ... related surnames in ship manifest.What is strange is all the emigrants on page were Slovak and most from places located in western and eastern Slovakia.
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 29, 2001
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              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., "savedbygrace1996" <TracynPhillip@a...> wrote:
              > Thanks for your response John. I found Padina in one of those
              > traveler guides. The map shows it just a little northeast of
              > Beograd. When my great-grandparents came over their place of
              > residence was given as Lajosfalva.
              >
              > I've never seen "Babuchnova". That's very interesting. We're not
              > really sure of the name origin although some of the family believed
              > it to be Russian. I've also seen it spelled Bubuchna.
              >
              > I'll post my "to be translated's" in a separate post to the web.
              >
              > Thanks again,
              > Tracy

              Don't know your surnames, however...

              Padina is located 22 miles NNE of Beograd (Belgrade), Serbia
              (all that is left of former Yugoslavia)
              Before WW I, Nagylajosfalva (meaning large + Louis's + village in Magyar)
              was located north of Beograd in Torontál megye(county), Hungary.


              NATO and American airforces bombed Serbia in the 1990s.

              How are you ? English

              Ako sa más^ ? Slovak

              Kako ste ? Croatian/Slovene (Roman)

              K A K C T E ? Serbian/Bulgarian/Macedonian (Cyrillic)
              k ah k s t eh)

              K A K D E J| A' ? Russian (Cyrillic)
              (k ah k dy e l a )


              One of most common Slavic surname affixes is the one denoting gender
              of the bearer -ová (Slovak), -owa (Polish), and -oba (Russian).
              (Russians have three names : surname, first name and patronymic-
              which tells us the first name of the person's father)

              As a rule of Slavic grammar, female surnames end in -á, -ská, or -ová.
              The feminine form of the surnames is considered merely a separate form
              of same surname, not a distinct surname in itself.
              Babuchnová would be feminine gender form of name; family name
              Babuchna ?

              Many Polish surnames end in -ski or -cki.
              In older records you sometimes read -sky (before spelling rules
              were adapted); but in recent times tendency to insist on -ski.
              Probably a possessive affix added to name which evolved from person's
              characteristics (such as 'tall, short, etc.), occupation, or place of
              residence.
              If Dubovski was a Slovak surname it is spelled Dubovsky.

              Surname Drugala is associated with Vrbovce (Sk) Verbóc (H) in
              western Slovakia.
              and Spis^ská Nová Ves, Slovakia -interesting region.
              Germans, Slovaks, Rusyns, Croatians, Hungarians, and Poles.
              Don't know which group settled here first in 12th, 14th, and 16th
              centuries.

              Ellis Island Records lists in a German ship manifest :

              First, a mother, Maria Babuchna, age 25, Slovak, married.
              next, a Mihaly (Michael) Babuchna, Slovak, emigrated to the U.S.
              in 1912, age 5 years 6 months, from Nagylajos, Hungary, which
              was Nagylajosfalva misspelled.
              Next his brother Janos (John) Babuchna, age 1 year, 6 months.

              Then my maternal great GM (Frances Vidra) , age 61 , Slovak,
              now a widow, listed under a misspelled village in Upper-Hungary
              (now western Slovakia)
              That's a first for me. An actual related surname while researching other un=
              related surnames in ship manifest.

              What is strange is all the emigrants on page were Slovak and most
              from places
              located in western and eastern Slovakia.
              Except the Babuchna surname bearers and a few others were from Nagylajosfal=
              va (Yugoslavia)
            • savedbygrace1996
              Thanks for all the very interesting information. THe Babuchna s that you found on the ship manifest are mine. Mihaly was Maria s husband and Janos was my
              Message 6 of 9 , Dec 29, 2001
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                Thanks for all the very interesting information. THe Babuchna's that
                you found on the ship manifest are mine. Mihaly was Maria's husband
                and Janos was my grandfather. Mihaly made several trips to the U.S
                before Maria and the children came to join him but I only found one
                in the Ellis Island records. His naturalization papers have him
                emmigrating to the U.S. in March of 1910 onboard the Campania.

                Maria was the Dubovsky and a Paul Durgala was suppose to be her first
                cousin. He had at least two children: Palko and Anka.

                Some of the family is under the impression that the Babuchna's
                originated in Siberia, Russia.

                I sure do appreciate all your input.
                Thanks,
                Tracy
              • frankly1us
                ... ese District: 5 - Hodschag Records in Parabutsch since 1785 Records before 1785 in Hodschag You had better read Donauschwaben (German) URL below for
                Message 7 of 9 , Dec 29, 2001
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                  --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., "savedbygrace1996" <TracynPhillip@a...> wrote:
                  > Thanks for all the very interesting information. THe Babuchna's that
                  > you found on the ship manifest are mine. Mihaly was Maria's husband
                  > and Janos was my grandfather. Mihaly made several trips to the U.S
                  > before Maria and the children came to join him but I only found one
                  > in the Ellis Island records. His naturalization papers have him
                  > emmigrating to the U.S. in March of 1910 onboard the Campania.
                  >
                  > Maria was the Dubovsky and a Paul Durgala was suppose to be her first
                  > cousin. He had at least two children: Palko and Anka.
                  >
                  > Some of the family is under the impression that the Babuchna's
                  > originated in Siberia, Russia.
                  >
                  > I sure do appreciate all your input.
                  > Thanks,
                  > Tracy

                  The surnames Babuchnová, Dubovsky/Dubovská, and Durgala/Durgalová
                  appear in the Slovakia censuses.

                  A Andras (Andrew) Babuchna, age 27, emigrated to U.S. in 1907 from
                  Nagylajosfalva (Yugoslavia)

                  Paul (E) = Palko (H)


                  In Russian B A B U CH N A
                  6 a 6 y h h a (Cyrillic)
                  |
                  inverted

                  If so, surname religion should have been Russian Orthodox ?

                  Of 18 surname Durgala listed in EIR, most were from Pinczéd, Bács-
                  Bodrog megye, Hungary now located in former Yugoslavia (Serbia)
                  Serbians also use the Cyrillic alphabet.
                  Village Names:

                  German: Ludwigsdorf
                  Official: Padina
                  Hungarian: Nagylajosfalva

                  Location:

                  Country: Yugoslavia
                  N from Pancevo
                  Postal Code: 26215
                  Railroad station:
                  Filial parish of: Glogau, Seffkerin

                  Population:

                  1931: 32 Germans

                  Location:

                  Country: Yugoslavia
                  near Hodschag
                  Postal-Code:
                  Railroad station:

                  Population:

                  1921: 4,861 (350)
                  1910: 4,955 (309)
                  1880: 4,421 (393)

                  Genealogical Records:

                  Village name in FHL records:
                  Church records available at FHL:
                  FHL Microfilm Nr.:
                  FHL Census Microfilm: Pivnitza in 1828: 622967

                  Miscellaneous:

                  Bibliography
                  Earliest Appearance in History: 1650
                  Earliest German Settlement: Before 1900
                  Churches: Greek Orthodox/Bács diocese, Evangelical Lutheran/Bánya dioc=
                  ese
                  District: 5 - Hodschag
                  Records in Parabutsch since 1785
                  Records before 1785 in Hodschag

                  You had better read Donauschwaben (German) URL below for
                  Bánát and Backa regions.


                  http://www.genealogienetz.de/reg/ESE/dsbanat.html
                • John
                  ... Frank, is there a reference book that gives the names of the villages in Hungary over the past couple of centuries? In regard to the Russian greeting,
                  Message 8 of 9 , Dec 29, 2001
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                    At 11:08 PM 12/29/01 +0000, you wrote:
                    >Don't know your surnames, however...
                    >
                    >Padina is located 22 miles NNE of Beograd (Belgrade), Serbia
                    >(all that is left of former Yugoslavia)
                    >Before WW I, Nagylajosfalva (meaning large + Louis's + village in Magyar)
                    >was located north of Beograd in Torontál megye(county), Hungary.
                    >
                    >
                    >NATO and American airforces bombed Serbia in the 1990s.
                    >
                    >How are you ? English
                    >
                    >Ako sa más^ ? Slovak
                    >
                    >Kako ste ? Croatian/Slovene (Roman)
                    >
                    >K A K C T E ? Serbian/Bulgarian/Macedonian (Cyrillic)
                    >k ah k s t eh)
                    >
                    >K A K D E J| A' ? Russian (Cyrillic)
                    >(k ah k dy e l a )

                    Frank, is there a reference book that gives the names of the villages in
                    Hungary over the past couple of centuries?

                    In regard to the Russian greeting, K-ah-k po-zhi-vy-esh (phonetically)
                    would be "How are you?" and K-ah-k dy-e-la would be "How's
                    business?". I'm sure it's usage has given it essentially the same
                    meaning. I was told the Russian dandies of the early 20th century replied
                    to "Kak dyela" with "Kak sa-zh-a bi-ye-la". Translated it would be:
                    "How's business?" and the reply "Like soot is white".

                    Which reminds me of the one about two gentlemen sitting on a park bench in
                    NYC talking. After about an hour one says to the other "You never asked me
                    how's business?". The other then asks "How's business?". The first
                    replies "Don't ask.".

                    John
                  • frankly1us
                    ... r) was located north of Beograd in Torontál megye(county), Hungary. NATO and American airforces bombed Serbia in the 1990s. How are
                    Message 9 of 9 , Dec 30, 2001
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                      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., John <jmatsko4@h...> wrote:
                      > At 11:08 PM 12/29/01 +0000, you wrote:
                      > >Don't know your surnames, however...
                      > >
                      > >Padina is located 22 miles NNE of Beograd (Belgrade), Serbia
                      > >(all that is left of former Yugoslavia)
                      > >Before WW I, Nagylajosfalva (meaning large + Louis's + village in Magya=
                      r)
                      > >was located north of Beograd in Torontál megye(county), Hungary.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >NATO and American airforces bombed Serbia in the 1990s.
                      > >
                      > >How are you ? English
                      > >
                      > >Ako sa más^ ? Slovak
                      > >
                      > >Kako ste ? Croatian/Slovene (Roman)
                      > >
                      > >K A K C T E ? Serbian/Bulgarian/Macedonian (Cyrillic)
                      > >k ah k s t eh)
                      > >
                      > >K A K D E J| A' ? Russian (Cyrillic)
                      > >(k ah k dy e l a )
                      >
                      > Frank, is there a reference book that gives the names of the villages in =

                      > Hungary over the past couple of centuries?
                      >
                      > In regard to the Russian greeting, K-ah-k po-zhi-vy-esh (phonetically)
                      > would be "How are you?" and K-ah-k dy-e-la would be "How's
                      > business?". I'm sure it's usage has given it essentially the same
                      > meaning. I was told the Russian dandies of the early 20th century replie=
                      d
                      > to "Kak dyela" with "Kak sa-zh-a bi-ye-la". Translated it would be:
                      > "How's business?" and the reply "Like soot is white".
                      >
                      > Which reminds me of the one about two gentlemen sitting on a park bench i=
                      n
                      > NYC talking. After about an hour one says to the other "You never asked =
                      me
                      > how's business?". The other then asks "How's business?". The first
                      > replies "Don't ask.".
                      >
                      > John

                      There are gazeteers that give names of villages over the centuries
                      for Slovakia and available only in Slovakia.
                      Some places had dozens or more different names over the years.
                      Was OP and then updated was successful and all printings sold out
                      in a week.
                      Cheaper trade paperback versions were also available in Bratislava.

                      Gazetteer by Milan Majté lists and indexes the communities with
                      their German, Hungarian, Slovak, Czech, Polish....names.
                      The Mormons have microfilmed this book.
                      Periodically new revised editions have been published.
                      It cost less than $10CDN in Slovakia

                      Nézy obcí na Slovensku za ostantych dvesto rokov (Place names in
                      Slovakia during the past 200 years) by Milan Majtén.

                      Or, titled " Nazvy obci Slovenskej republiky: vyvin v rokoch 1773-1997 ". =

                      "Names of settlements in Slovakia in last 200 years".

                      For example,Bardejov:

                      1773 Bartpha, Bartfa, Bartfeldt, Bardiow, 1786 Bartfeld, Bartfa,
                      Bardejow, 1808 Bartpha, Bartfa, Bardiow, Bardejow, Bardiuv, 1863-1913
                      Bartfa, 1920 Bardiov, 1927 Bardejov


                      Or, Hungarian (János) Dvorzsák Gazetteer (1870) is available at LDS FHCs
                      on microfilm film 599564 and on microfiche.

                      There is Hungarian Village Finder by subscription.
                      1 Full Year-- $29.95
                      Haven't subscribed as yet.

                      http://hungarianvillagefinder.com/


                      Then there is 3 Volume VLASTIVEDNY SLOVNIK OBCI NA SLOVENSKU
                      Dictionary of all villages in Slovakia with complete historic
                      data and pictures with all the old and new names for all villages
                      in current Slovakia from their first ever mention in written records.

                      Sold by that old Slovakia genealogy fraud Vladimir Linder who always
                      over-priced the books he sold.
                      Now he has grandchildren and perhaps he wants to retire.
                      His price for 3 volumes is US$ 675.00 (six hundred and seventy-five
                      dollars)

                      Formerly I used

                      K A K B bI || O >|< |/| B A E T E ? Russian (Cyrillic)
                      (k ah k v i p a zh i v a yet yeh)

                      Russian linguists suggested I change it.

                      Russian

                      How are things ?
                      kak dyela ?

                      What's new ?
                      shto novava ?

                      Don't ask !
                      ne sprashivayte !
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