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Clearing the Air

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  • Andrea Vangor
    Dear June and List, Somehow, a subject discussed on the list got a bit out of hand during your absence. Someone introduced the subject of the different
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 26, 1999
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      Dear June and List,

      Somehow, a subject discussed on the list got a bit out of hand during your
      absence. Someone introduced the subject of the different standards of
      personal cleanliness in Eastern Europe versus the U.S. I think it is an
      interesting and valid topic, but like any other people need to avoid
      extremes that others might find offensive.

      What interests me is, for example, the practical problem of washing clothes
      when the traditional wardrobe consisted primarily of wool and linen
      garments. Linen is a very "cleansing" fiber that naturally repels dirt and
      oils, so it does not really need to be washed as often as synthetic fibers
      or even cotton. Maybe the custom was to air clothing out after wearing and
      then pack them back into the storage chest, since they did not have closets.
      I also think that the wooden chests in which clothes were kept must make a
      difference. If the clothes were kept packed in aromatic cedar shavings or
      dried lavendar or rosemary, for example, the clothes would be "cleaned" by
      contact with the essential oils permeating the chest.

      People used to sponge off their woolen clothing with vinegar to remove
      spots, but they did not take things to the dry cleaner. Instead they wore
      linen underclothing and washed that, maybe once a week or so. I remember a
      fascinating exhibit of 18th century clothing at a local museum that
      explained how people laundered their clothes and how often. The difference
      with our modern synthetic fibers is that they tend to hold on to soil etc.
      and need frequent washing. I have three gorgeous linen blouses from
      Slovakia, two big enough to fit, and I don't think I would dare to wash them
      for fear that it might hurt the embroidery, so they stay wrapped in tissue
      paper. Any experts out there? I know that linen is supposed to be dried in
      the sun to bleach it, but would that not bleach the colors in the embroidery
      too?

      Andrea
    • sabinov@xxxxx.xxx
      Andrea, I believe you are referencing a post from another list, as nothing like that topic was on SLOVAK-ROOTS. This topic would be off topic for SLOVAK-ROOTS.
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 26, 1999
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        Andrea,

        I believe you are referencing a post from another list, as nothing like
        that topic was on SLOVAK-ROOTS.

        This topic would be off topic for SLOVAK-ROOTS.

        Thank you!

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        Maura Petzolt Mobile Alabama USA
        sabinov@...
        Helpful Hints for Successful Searching
        http://www.rootsweb.com/~irlwat/instruct.htm
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      • Andrea Vangor
        Sorry, this posted to the wrong list -- I hit the reply button and thought it would post on SlovakWorld. ... From: Andrea Vangor To: Slovak Roots
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 26, 1999
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          Sorry, this posted to the wrong list -- I hit the reply button and thought
          it would post on SlovakWorld.

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Andrea Vangor <drav@...>
          To: Slovak Roots <SLOVAK-ROOTS@onelist.com>
          Sent: Saturday, June 26, 1999 2:37 PM
          Subject: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Clearing the Air


          > From: "Andrea Vangor" <drav@...>
          >
          > Dear June and List,
          >
          > Somehow, a subject discussed on the list got a bit out of hand during your
          > absence. Someone introduced the subject of the different standards of
          > personal cleanliness in Eastern Europe versus the U.S. I think it is an
          > interesting and valid topic, but like any other people need to avoid
          > extremes that others might find offensive.
          >
          > What interests me is, for example, the practical problem of washing
          clothes
          > when the traditional wardrobe consisted primarily of wool and linen
          > garments. Linen is a very "cleansing" fiber that naturally repels dirt
          and
          > oils, so it does not really need to be washed as often as synthetic fibers
          > or even cotton. Maybe the custom was to air clothing out after wearing
          and
          > then pack them back into the storage chest, since they did not have
          closets.
          > I also think that the wooden chests in which clothes were kept must make a
          > difference. If the clothes were kept packed in aromatic cedar shavings or
          > dried lavendar or rosemary, for example, the clothes would be "cleaned" by
          > contact with the essential oils permeating the chest.
          >
          > People used to sponge off their woolen clothing with vinegar to remove
          > spots, but they did not take things to the dry cleaner. Instead they wore
          > linen underclothing and washed that, maybe once a week or so. I remember
          a
          > fascinating exhibit of 18th century clothing at a local museum that
          > explained how people laundered their clothes and how often. The
          difference
          > with our modern synthetic fibers is that they tend to hold on to soil etc.
          > and need frequent washing. I have three gorgeous linen blouses from
          > Slovakia, two big enough to fit, and I don't think I would dare to wash
          them
          > for fear that it might hurt the embroidery, so they stay wrapped in tissue
          > paper. Any experts out there? I know that linen is supposed to be dried
          in
          > the sun to bleach it, but would that not bleach the colors in the
          embroidery
          > too?
          >
          > Andrea
          >
          >
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        • Andrea Vangor
          Yes. I hit the wrong button -- please excuse the digression! ... From: To: Sent: Saturday, June 26, 1999 2:39
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 26, 1999
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            Yes. I hit the wrong button -- please excuse the digression!

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: <sabinov@...>
            To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@onelist.com>
            Sent: Saturday, June 26, 1999 2:39 PM
            Subject: Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Clearing the Air


            > From: sabinov@...
            >
            > Andrea,
            >
            > I believe you are referencing a post from another list, as nothing like
            > that topic was on SLOVAK-ROOTS.
            >
            > This topic would be off topic for SLOVAK-ROOTS.
            >
            > Thank you!
            >
            > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            > Maura Petzolt Mobile Alabama USA
            > sabinov@...
            > Helpful Hints for Successful Searching
            > http://www.rootsweb.com/~irlwat/instruct.htm
            > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            >
            >
            > --------------------------- ONElist Sponsor ----------------------------
            >
            > Attention ONElist list owners.
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            > Check out the new "DEFAULT MODERATED STATUS" option. See homepage.
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