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Re: Christmas Eve Supper

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  • Sandy Niemi
    Hi Katherine, The following comes directly from a Slovak cook book I have: Christmas Eve the entire family gathered at the home of parents or grandparents and
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 27, 1999
      Hi Katherine,

      The following comes directly from a Slovak cook book I have:

      Christmas Eve the entire family gathered at the home of parents or
      grandparents and at the first sight of the evening star everyone would begin
      a delicious meal. Dishes were served in a strict order that the mother
      decreed. After the father or grandfather recited a lengthy prayer, the
      mother would direct the dipping of communion wafers (oplatky) in honey,
      which symbolized the "food of the gods." Served next would be KAPUSTA
      (sauerkraut) or Hriby (mushroom) soup, fried fish or KLOBASA, bean and
      potato salads and BOBALKY (small buns in ground poppyseed) or dates and figs
      (which were a reminder of the Holy Land). Mulled wine accompanied this meal
      as did assorted poppyseed and nut pastries and a variety of fresh and mixed
      dried fruits and mixed nuts.

      As I remember, my grandmother used to have 12 meatless dishes on Christmas
      Eve. I can't remember them all but some were the: Oplatky - communion wafers
      (blessed by the priest) in honey, next was the Kapusta (sauerkraut) or Hriby
      (mushroom) soup, PEROGIES (potato, prune, and saurerkraut), Fried Fish,
      beans made with fresh garlic, Bobalky - small buns in ground poppyseed (or
      sauerkraut,or cheese mashed potatoes & onions). She also had assorted
      poppyseed rolls, pastries, strudels, and poteca. I wish I could remember the
      other courses.

      Christmas Eve was so special - I recall the stories of her cleaning out one
      entire room and filling it with straw and a large manger scene. They would
      hide candy and nuts in the hay for the grandchildren to find. I remember
      being frightened as my older siblings and cousins trampled right over us
      younger ones. I also remember lining up to get the communion wafer (blessed
      by the priest) and honey and my grandmother would make the sign of the
      cross on our foreheads with ashes from the stove. (Must have been to ward
      away evil spirits). In later years when we didn't have the ashes we used
      honey to make the cross on the forehead.

      To this day we have carried on some of the traditional foods, the honey &
      and everyone washes their face in a bowl of water filled with coins. I think
      that is suppose to make us wealthy through the year. Of course the children
      get to keep the money they pick up in their hands.

      I would also be interested in the other customs people remember about
      Christmas Eve.

      Hope this helps,
      Sandy
      sniemi@...

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: mkz <mkzluky@...>
      To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@onelist.com>
      Sent: Monday, September 27, 1999 9:09 AM
      Subject: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Christmas Eve Supper


      > From: mkz <mkzluky@...>
      >
      > Hi All,
      > A small Church group I belong to is looking for a script of prayers,
      > songs with music and a food list for a Slovak Christmas Eve Supper.
      > There will be about 25 people attending if we can ever get it together.
      > Can anyone help?
      > Thanks
      > Katherine
      >
      > >
    • mkz
      Hi Sandy, Thank you so much for the wonderful tradition and story and yes it does help. Were there any prayers or songs that you remember in Slovak? We are
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 28, 1999
        Hi Sandy,
        Thank you so much for the wonderful tradition and story and yes it does help.
        Were there any prayers or songs that you remember in Slovak? We are trying to
        put a short play together before the the meal is eaten. It's late for this year
        so maybe next for the whole thing.
        Thanks again,
        Katherine

        Sandy Niemi wrote:

        > From: "Sandy Niemi" <sniemi@...>
        >
        > Hi Katherine,
        >
        > The following comes directly from a Slovak cook book I have:
        >
        > Christmas Eve the entire family gathered at the home of parents or
        > grandparents and at the first sight of the evening star everyone would begin
        > a delicious meal. Dishes were served in a strict order that the mother
        > decreed. After the father or grandfather recited a lengthy prayer, the
        > mother would direct the dipping of communion wafers (oplatky) in honey,
        > which symbolized the "food of the gods." Served next would be KAPUSTA
        > (sauerkraut) or Hriby (mushroom) soup, fried fish or KLOBASA, bean and
        > potato salads and BOBALKY (small buns in ground poppyseed) or dates and figs
        > (which were a reminder of the Holy Land). Mulled wine accompanied this meal
        > as did assorted poppyseed and nut pastries and a variety of fresh and mixed
        > dried fruits and mixed nuts.
        >
        > As I remember, my grandmother used to have 12 meatless dishes on Christmas
        > Eve. I can't remember them all but some were the: Oplatky - communion wafers
        > (blessed by the priest) in honey, next was the Kapusta (sauerkraut) or Hriby
        > (mushroom) soup, PEROGIES (potato, prune, and saurerkraut), Fried Fish,
        > beans made with fresh garlic, Bobalky - small buns in ground poppyseed (or
        > sauerkraut,or cheese mashed potatoes & onions). She also had assorted
        > poppyseed rolls, pastries, strudels, and poteca. I wish I could remember the
        > other courses.
        >
        > Christmas Eve was so special - I recall the stories of her cleaning out one
        > entire room and filling it with straw and a large manger scene. They would
        > hide candy and nuts in the hay for the grandchildren to find. I remember
        > being frightened as my older siblings and cousins trampled right over us
        > younger ones. I also remember lining up to get the communion wafer (blessed
        > by the priest) and honey and my grandmother would make the sign of the
        > cross on our foreheads with ashes from the stove. (Must have been to ward
        > away evil spirits). In later years when we didn't have the ashes we used
        > honey to make the cross on the forehead.
        >
        > To this day we have carried on some of the traditional foods, the honey &
        > and everyone washes their face in a bowl of water filled with coins. I think
        > that is suppose to make us wealthy through the year. Of course the children
        > get to keep the money they pick up in their hands.
        >
        > I would also be interested in the other customs people remember about
        > Christmas Eve.
        >
        > Hope this helps,
        > Sandy
        > sniemi@...
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: mkz <mkzluky@...>
        > To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@onelist.com>
        > Sent: Monday, September 27, 1999 9:09 AM
        > Subject: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Christmas Eve Supper
        >
        > > From: mkz <mkzluky@...>
        > >
        > > Hi All,
        > > A small Church group I belong to is looking for a script of prayers,
        > > songs with music and a food list for a Slovak Christmas Eve Supper.
        > > There will be about 25 people attending if we can ever get it together.
        > > Can anyone help?
        > > Thanks
        > > Katherine
        > >
        > > >
        >
        >
      • mkz
        Hi, Thanks for the information. I can almost taste those balls of bread with the cheese sauce and onions. Katherine
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 28, 1999
          Hi,
          Thanks for the information. I can almost taste those balls of bread with the
          cheese sauce and onions.
          Katherine

          JArcher360@... wrote:

          > From: JArcher360@...
          >
          > My grand mother made something called "o-pe-kan-seh" (phonetic spelling). It
          > was little balls of bread dough which were baked, then put into some sort of
          > cheese sauce with onions and butter in it. She also made some sort of
          > mushroom soup. And of course, there was always the Oblatki and honey.
          >
          >
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