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Re: [S-R] LDS microfilm: Hungary

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  • John
    ... Not necessarily. It might give you clues. If they married in Szendro, and the groom was from another town it would be noted. The marriage record of your
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 30, 2001
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      At 04:45 PM 9/30/01 +0000, you wrote:
      >Let me see if I understand...If I go to the LDS library, the Hungarian
      >Church microfilm will have information on where the Szemanszki family
      >came from when they entered Szendro back in the mid 1800's?

      Not necessarily. It might give you clues. If they married in Szendro, and
      the groom was from another town it would be noted. The marriage record of
      your "3 great grandfather" might indicate the town he was from. The links
      Frank posted could be very useful. The mid 1800's was a turbulent period
      in Hungary and elsewhere with revolt and, at least in the case of upper
      Hungary, a cholera epidemic taking place. I'm sure this caused some
      displacement of people. I don't know which, if any nations, allied with
      Austria to put down the Hungarian Revolt. There is a possibility that the
      first Szemanszki in Szendro might have been part of an allied army or just
      from a neighboring town or village.

      Parish records use a standardized format and translations of the headings
      are available so you can get a lot of information without having to know
      the language. Any side notes or other forms of records would probably
      require a translation.

      John
    • frankur@att.net
      ... In most European countries R.C. parish church records were written in Latin. Have read microfilms in Czech, Slovak, Polish, Croatian, Russian, Serbian,
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 1, 2001
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        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., John <jmatsko4@h...> wrote:
        > At 04:45 PM 9/30/01 +0000, you wrote:
        > >Let me see if I understand...If I go to the LDS library, the Hungarian
        > >Church microfilm will have information on where the Szemanszki family
        > >came from when they entered Szendro back in the mid 1800's?
        >
        > Not necessarily. It might give you clues. If they married in Szendro, and
        > the groom was from another town it would be noted. The marriage record of
        > your "3 great grandfather" might indicate the town he was from. The links
        > Frank posted could be very useful. The mid 1800's was a turbulent period
        > in Hungary and elsewhere with revolt and, at least in the case of upper
        > Hungary, a cholera epidemic taking place. I'm sure this caused some
        > displacement of people. I don't know which, if any nations, allied with
        > Austria to put down the Hungarian Revolt. There is a possibility that the
        > first Szemanszki in Szendro might have been part of an allied army or just
        > from a neighboring town or village.
        >
        > Parish records use a standardized format and translations of the headings
        > are available so you can get a lot of information without having to know
        > the language. Any side notes or other forms of records would probably
        > require a translation.
        >
        > John

        In most European countries R.C. parish church records were written in
        Latin.
        Have read microfilms in Czech, Slovak, Polish, Croatian, Russian,
        Serbian, Ukrainian, Slovene, Hungarian, German, Latin, and Italian.
        For those that were R.C. the church used a set template format in the
        church registers regardless of which country in Europe, only
        the language changed.

        Slovakia wasn't a Slovak political entity before WW I.
        The Magyars ruled what was later called Slovakia from 906 AD until
        1918 AD, nearly a 1000 years.

        When the failed Hungarian Revolution of 1848-1849 errupted, with
        With the help of the Russian Tsar's armies, the new Hapsburg
        emperor Franz Joseph I, put down the Hungarian revolution.
        Following the failed Hungarian Revolt in 1849 , the Austrians forbid
        the use of Hungarian in records and they were written in Latin again.

        After the dual Austro-Hungarian Monarchy was established in 1867
        the records went back to Hungarian again.

        Sometime in the 1870s the Hungarians outlawed teaching Slovak in
        schools and only the Hungarian language was taught in Slovakia.

        No different when the Communists took control of the Czechoslovakia
        government after WW 2 in 1948.
        Only the Russian language was taught in the schools.
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