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Re: Futej and Danel/Daniels

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  • frankur@att.net
    ... rand parents..... on my grandmothers birth cert., her parents are both listed = as being born in Austria..... have also been told they were born in
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 24, 2001
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      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@y..., Hrtswhspr@a... wrote:
      > Seeking info an Jon (John) DANIELS or Barbara FUTEJ. They are my great g=
      rand
      > parents..... on my grandmothers birth cert., her parents are both listed =
      as
      > being born in Austria..... have also been told they were born in Slovack.=

      > Born approx. 1877-1879. Family story has it they met in New Jersey..... =
      but
      > that is unproven at this time. Thier first child was listed as being bor=
      n in
      > New York in 1902..... several more in Clifton, New Jersey..... and still =
      more
      > in Milford CT. The last child was born in 1920. Also.....how often do y=
      ou
      > find the birth cert. name to be different from the name used as an child =
      and
      > adult? On my grandmothers birth cert. she is listed as "Margarete Danel=
      "
      > But later in life used Helen Margaret Daniels. (Social Sec. App.... deat=
      h
      > cert etc....) soooo is this common?

      Before WW I, Slovakia was part of Upper Hungary (Felvidék) and
      part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (1867-1918) and earlier a
      part of Hungary under the Austrian Empire.
      Hungarian names were used for towns and counties.

      The surnames Danel, Daniel, Danihel and Futej (Futey) all appear
      in Slovakia.
      The question is where ?

      Many emigrants changed their names after arrival in the U.S.
      In American records many surnames were 'sounds-like' rather than
      the original surname spelling.
      The listener (clerk, official, priest) wrote down what he thought the
      emigrant had said in reply to question.

      Read a U.S. marriage certificate once, where the surnames of bride and
      groom were written 4 different ways in the same document.
      Nobody checked for the correct spelling.
      In addition the couple were both minors and had added 5 years to their
      actual ages.
      Nobody checked until years later when they were naturalized as American cit=
      izens.
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