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Looking for Vida, Pal (Paul, Paulus)

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  • lancebatchelder
    Hello all of you amazing researchers, I have hit a brick wall and since you have been so helpful in the past, I thought I would ask for help again. I have an
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 15, 2014

      Hello all of you amazing researchers,

      I have hit a brick wall and since you have been so helpful in the past, I thought I would ask for help again.  I have an ancestor, Pal Vida, from Plavnica. Stara Lubovna, Hungary.  His daughter, Anna, married Andras Grich and they settled in Pennsylvania.  I have looked at the Roman Catholic church records and found the family members of Pal and Katalin Legnavski (married 1888).  Pal was much older, with a birthdate of about 1936, which led me to believe this was a second marriage.  In the church records I found baptism records for children born to Pal and Anna Fenyak (Xenyak, Kenyak) living at the same address as Pal and Katalin.  I am looking to find Pal's parents and siblings as well as any other wives and children.  Does anyone on this list have ancestry from Plavinca or have Vidas in their family tree?

      Thank you,

      Andrea

    • MGMojher
      Andrea, My paternal roots are in Plavnica and nearby Hromos. I have downloaded the Roman Catholic records for the Plavnica parish. From the online records -
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 16, 2014
        Andrea,
            My paternal roots are in Plavnica and nearby Hromos. I have downloaded the Roman Catholic records for the Plavnica parish. From the online records - https://familysearch.org/search/collection/results?count=20&query=%2Bgivenname%3APal~%20%2Bsurname%3AVida~&collection_id=1554443 This the only record from Plavnica. Yet if you scroll down to other records without a location you can find more children of Pal and Katalin.
            It is not surprising that Pal Vida and Anna Fenyak would have Pal Vida and Katalin Legnavski in the same household. Extended families often lived together. From the record below it appears you may have a third generation with a Pal Vida.
            You mentioned Pal and Katalin married in 1888. What month?
            I have made 7 trips to Slovakia and spent the equivalent of a couple of months in Hromos. If you care to communicate write me at mgmojher@...
        Michael Mojher
        Pál Vida

         

        baptism:30 October 1888Plavnica, Stará Ľubovňa, Slovakia
        father:Pál Vida
        mother:Katalin Legnavszki
         
         
        Sent: Friday, August 15, 2014 7:23 PM
        Subject: [S-R] Looking for Vida, Pal (Paul, Paulus)
         
         

        Hello all of you amazing researchers,

        I have hit a brick wall and since you have been so helpful in the past, I thought I would ask for help again.  I have an ancestor, Pal Vida, from Plavnica. Stara Lubovna, Hungary.  His daughter, Anna, married Andras Grich and they settled in Pennsylvania.  I have looked at the Roman Catholic church records and found the family members of Pal and Katalin Legnavski (married 1888).  Pal was much older, with a birthdate of about 1936, which led me to believe this was a second marriage.  In the church records I found baptism records for children born to Pal and Anna Fenyak (Xenyak, Kenyak) living at the same address as Pal and Katalin.  I am looking to find Pal's parents and siblings as well as any other wives and children.  Does anyone on this list have ancestry from Plavinca or have Vidas in their family tree?

        Thank you,

        Andrea

      • William C. Wormuth
        I recommend that you search the site below, (LDS Family search .org.) I cannot instruct you here on how to use but I was there and found much info on Pal Vida
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 16, 2014
          I recommend that you search the site below, (LDS Family search .org.)

          I cannot instruct you here on how to use but I was there and found much info on Pal Vida Family.  In Ellis Island I found he came to his Brother in Long Island.


          I find that many immigrants came to family members and then proceeded to an area where there were jobs available.


          On Saturday, August 16, 2014 11:51 AM, "'MGMojher' mgmojher@... [SLOVAK-ROOTS]" <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


           
          Andrea,
              My paternal roots are in Plavnica and nearby Hromos. I have downloaded the Roman Catholic records for the Plavnica parish. From the online records - https://familysearch.org/search/collection/results?count=20&query=%2Bgivenname%3APal~%20%2Bsurname%3AVida~&collection_id=1554443 This the only record from Plavnica. Yet if you scroll down to other records without a location you can find more children of Pal and Katalin.
              It is not surprising that Pal Vida and Anna Fenyak would have Pal Vida and Katalin Legnavski in the same household. Extended families often lived together. From the record below it appears you may have a third generation with a Pal Vida.
              You mentioned Pal and Katalin married in 1888. What month?
              I have made 7 trips to Slovakia and spent the equivalent of a couple of months in Hromos. If you care to communicate write me at mgmojher@...
          Michael Mojher
          Pál Vida
           
          baptism:30 October 1888Plavnica, Stará Ľubovňa, Slovakia
          father:Pál Vida
          mother:Katalin Legnavszki
           
           
          Sent: Friday, August 15, 2014 7:23 PM
          Subject: [S-R] Looking for Vida, Pal (Paul, Paulus)
           
           
          Hello all of you amazing researchers,
          I have hit a brick wall and since you have been so helpful in the past, I thought I would ask for help again.  I have an ancestor, Pal Vida, from Plavnica. Stara Lubovna, Hungary.  His daughter, Anna, married Andras Grich and they settled in Pennsylvania.  I have looked at the Roman Catholic church records and found the family members of Pal and Katalin Legnavski (married 1888).  Pal was much older, with a birthdate of about 1936, which led me to believe this was a second marriage.  In the church records I found baptism records for children born to Pal and Anna Fenyak (Xenyak, Kenyak) living at the same address as Pal and Katalin.  I am looking to find Pal's parents and siblings as well as any other wives and children.  Does anyone on this list have ancestry from Plavinca or have Vidas in their family tree?
          Thank you,
          Andrea


        • kmm817
          Re the Family Search website and searching Slovakian church records:I recently realized that the church records I am searching at the website ONLY include
          Message 4 of 12 , Aug 17, 2014
            Re the Family Search website and searching Slovakian church records:I recently realized that the church records I am searching at the website ONLY include baptisms.  While there are birth, marriage and death records in the actual microfilm copies, only baptisms have been translated for the website, and only baptisms appear through the search function.I don't know that this is across the board in the many church locations, but it is true in mine.  This makes some sense when considering the LDS purposes for genealogy (at least my limited knowledge of such).I spent the last week hunched over my computer screen reading through several hundred microfilmed pages to find death and marriage info.  Births are also recorded separately from christenings, and sometimes the writing is more legible in the duplicate record.  For people new at this, many of the translations are awful and do not reflect the actual record. Sometimes the priest missed a letter in the name. Sometimes there is a combination of both.  My Motyko surname was translated as Matylo, and the difference was enough to not be picked up by the search engine.The records are there, but don't believe what the search results tell you.  For new people, a lot of this you will find out as you research.  I've figured which of my family were Greek Catholic and which were Roman Catholic.  This gives me a jumping off point for which microfilm files to search.  And once you find that marriage record, for example, which lists ages of bride and groom, you have a better idea of where to search for that person's birth record, based on whether they were GC or RC.GOOD LUCK in your searching!Kristinelooking for Motyko, Valyovscik, Lyichota in Krivostany/Strazske
          • htcstech
            You ll get a few replies on that I bet. The indexing undertaken by volunteers isn t perfect and it is always derigeur to go to the page and read it for
            Message 5 of 12 , Aug 17, 2014
              You'll get a few replies on that I bet.
              The indexing undertaken by volunteers isn't perfect and it is always derigeur to go to the page and read it for yourself.
              Marriage and death records can be found in the books online if you know the village/county name and search manually. The biggest problem I found is that the quality of the indexing is variable and you cannot rely on correct spellings.

              Peter M


              On 17 August 2014 21:55, burbbliss@... [SLOVAK-ROOTS] <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
               

              Re the Family Search website and searching Slovakian church records:I recently realized that the church records I am searching at the website ONLY include baptisms.  While there are birth, marriage and death records in the actual microfilm copies, only baptisms have been translated for the website, and only baptisms appear through the search function.I don't know that this is across the board in the many church locations, but it is true in mine.  This makes some sense when considering the LDS purposes for genealogy (at least my limited knowledge of such).I spent the last week hunched over my computer screen reading through several hundred microfilmed pages to find death and marriage info.  Births are also recorded separately from christenings, and sometimes the writing is more legible in the duplicate record.  For people new at this, many of the translations are awful and do not reflect the actual record. Sometimes the priest missed a letter in the name. Sometimes there is a combination of both.  My Motyko surname was translated as Matylo, and the difference was enough to not be picked up by the search engine.The records are there, but don't believe what the search results tell you.  For new people, a lot of this you will find out as you research.  I've figured which of my family were Greek Catholic and which were Roman Catholic.  This gives me a jumping off point for which microfilm files to search.  And once you find that marriage record, for example, which lists ages of bride and groom, you have a better idea of where to search for that person's birth record, based on whether they were GC or RC.GOOD LUCK in your searching!Kristinelooking for Motyko, Valyovscik, Lyichota in Krivostany/Strazske


            • Suzanne
              And if you think translating or transcribing is easy - go to Ancestry.com and look at the records you have no familiarity with and see how good you can do.
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 17, 2014
                And if you think translating or transcribing is easy - go to Ancestry.com and look at the records you have no familiarity with and see how good you can do.  You must remember that you are looking for a specific record and you know what the spelling should be - the original transcriber is just looking at handwritten words.

                I do wish there was some way (as there is an Ancestry.com) that you could go in and post an alternate name and/or spelling to make is a bit easier for others that are searching.

                S

                Sent from my iPad

                On Aug 17, 2014, at 7:01 AM, "htcstech htcstech@... [SLOVAK-ROOTS]" <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                 

                You'll get a few replies on that I bet.
                The indexing undertaken by volunteers isn't perfect and it is always derigeur to go to the page and read it for yourself.
                Marriage and death records can be found in the books online if you know the village/county name and search manually. The biggest problem I found is that the quality of the indexing is variable and you cannot rely on correct spellings.

                Peter M


                On 17 August 2014 21:55, burbbliss@... [SLOVAK-ROOTS] <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                 

                Re the Family Search website and searching Slovakian church records:I recently realized that the church records I am searching at the website ONLY include baptisms.  While there are birth, marriage and death records in the actual microfilm copies, only baptisms have been translated for the website, and only baptisms appear through the search function.I don't know that this is across the board in the many church locations, but it is true in mine.  This makes some sense when considering the LDS purposes for genealogy (at least my limited knowledge of such).I spent the last week hunched over my computer screen reading through several hundred microfilmed pages to find death and marriage info.  Births are also recorded separately from christenings, and sometimes the writing is more legible in the duplicate record.  For people new at this, many of the translations are awful and do not reflect the actual record. Sometimes the priest missed a letter in the name. Sometimes there is a combination of both.  My Motyko surname was translated as Matylo, and the difference was enough to not be picked up by the search engine.The records are there, but don't believe what the search results tell you.  For new people, a lot of this you will find out as you research.  I've figured which of my family were Greek Catholic and which were Roman Catholic.  This gives me a jumping off point for which microfilm files to search.  And once you find that marriage record, for example, which lists ages of bride and groom, you have a better idea of where to search for that person's birth record, based on whether they were GC or RC.GOOD LUCK in your searching!Kristinelooking for Motyko, Valyovscik, Lyichota in Krivostany/Strazske


              • stibila@sbcglobal.net
                Have you tried the village where they may have lived? If you know I, they may have a list of the info you are looking for. Searching for our Ancestors is often
                Message 7 of 12 , Aug 18, 2014

                  Have you tried the village where they may have lived? If you know I, they may have a list of the info you are looking for.

                  Searching for our Ancestors is often frustrating because you don't know where to start. It took a long time to find some of the info I wanted, but it felt so good when I did. Quite and accomplishment.

                  Good luck

                • Catherine Rowland
                  The other problem that was pointed out to me on one of the forums is that Family search only uses Soundex which has a lot of limitations.  For example   in
                  Message 8 of 12 , Aug 18, 2014
                    The other problem that was pointed out to me on one of the forums is that Family search only uses Soundex which has a lot of limitations.  For example   in Hungarian Micar and Miczar are the same pronunciation (one is just an archaic version) but Family Search will not pick up on this.  You have to try all possible variations and also  think about how a transcriber might misinterpret a letter.  For example one of my ancestors has the surname Styava.    It is transcribed in the Hungarian Catholic records as Isjava.    Took me a while to stop searching for the non-existent Isjava family.  It was only when I ordered the records and looked at it my self that the mystery was solved.  Other benefits of physically looking through the records are that the surname spelling may have changed over time, names of godparents may provide clues as to the extended famiy and of course house numbers can be very useful..
                  • William C. Wormuth
                    Your problems are very common.  I have helped many times to resolve the problems: Slovakia was ruled by Hungary for over 1,000 years.  The official language
                    Message 9 of 12 , Aug 18, 2014
                      Your problems are very common.  I have helped many times to resolve the problems:
                      Slovakia was ruled by Hungary for over 1,000 years.  The official language until following WWI was Hungarian.
                      Therefore:
                      Micar [Mee-tsarr], in Hungarian spelled Miczar
                      Hungarian spelling - Styava [Shtyah-vah]  Slovak St'ava.  There is an accent mark over the S and I will write it here, hoping it will appear on your computer - Šťava,  (which means Juice)  The Slovak ť is rather difficult for some to pronounce.  it is "t", with your tongue Flat, on the roof of your mouth. our American dialects make it hard to compare to our English.
                      I have no explanation for Isjava .  [EEsh-yah-vah]  I would think it was misspelled


                      View on www.omniglot.com/writing/slovak.htm
                       
                       
                       

                       
                       
                       
                       
                       
                      Slovak language, alphabet and pronunciation
                      Information about Slovak, a Western Slavic language closely related to Czech and spoken mainly in Slovakia
                      Preview by Yahoo
                       
                        You may also use the GOOGLE translation found Here.
                       
                       
                       
                       
                       
                       
                      Slovak Alphabet compared to English - Google Search
                      Search Options Any time Past hour Past 24 hours Past week Past month Past year All results Verbatim About 1,640,000 results Slovak language, alphabet and pronunciation - Omniglot
                      Preview by Yahoo
                       
                        You will see a small speaker symbol.  Using that will help in pronunciation.

                      Martin Votruba, professor of Slovak Studies, of Pitt University has also provided this type info.


                    • davidsadventure4
                      I agree with what Catherine said about looking page-by-page through the records because the transcription of the surname may actually appear different than
                      Message 10 of 12 , Aug 19, 2014
                        I agree with what Catherine said about looking page-by-page through the records because the transcription of the surname may actually appear different than expected.  For one of my ancestral villages, the parish records recorded the surname about a dozen different ways, and it was the same surname, as the records when compared showed the same spouse, same house number, etc.  While the research may take longer, once you find the right ancestral village, I would highly recommend not only a page-by-page review, but also the cluster genealogy approach (making note of all members of a family in that parish, and all possible variants in the name).I hope that this helps a little.
                         
                        Best regards,
                         
                        David Baloga
                         
                        In a message dated 8/18/2014 10:11:57 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com writes:
                         

                        The other problem that was pointed out to me on one of the forums is that Family search only uses Soundex which has a lot of limitations.  For example   in Hungarian Micar and Miczar are the same pronunciation (one is just an archaic version) but Family Search will not pick up on this.  You have to try all possible variations and also  think about how a transcriber might misinterpret a letter.  For example one of my ancestors has the surname Styava.    It is transcribed in the Hungarian Catholic records as Isjava.    Took me a while to stop searching for the non-existent Isjava family.  It was only when I ordered the records and looked at it my self that the mystery was solved.  Other benefits of physically looking through the records are that the surname spelling may have changed over time, names of godparents may provide clues as to the extended famiy and of course house numbers can be very useful..

                      • randm1979
                        Andrea,I may have missed something here -- but did you know that 1869 census records for Plavnica are online, and that the probable household of your Vida
                        Message 11 of 12 , Aug 20, 2014
                          Andrea,I may have missed something here -- but did you know that 1869 census records for Plavnica are online, and that the probable household of your Vida family is listed in house 64?

                          https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-28475-11943-49?cc=1986782&wc=MPP8-HZ9:323642201,323950901

                          Here's link to Pal's first marriage record:
                          https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12443-95871-73?cc=1554443&wc=9PQD-16X:107654201,118466001,118937001,1161090002 (left page, last entry)


                          Pal's LDS birth index record (Paulus Jida); linked church record image (left page, 2nd entry from bottom) shows it's Paulus Vida:
                          https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V135-3PC


                          r/Mel



                          ---In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, <lancebatchelder@...> wrote :

                          Hello all of you amazing researchers,

                          I have hit a brick wall and since you have been so helpful in the past, I thought I would ask for help again.  I have an ancestor, Pal Vida, from Plavnica. Stara Lubovna, Hungary.  His daughter, Anna, married Andras Grich and they settled in Pennsylvania.  I have looked at the Roman Catholic church records and found the family members of Pal and Katalin Legnavski (married 1888).  Pal was much older, with a birthdate of about 1936, which led me to believe this was a second marriage.  In the church records I found baptism records for children born to Pal and Anna Fenyak (Xenyak, Kenyak) living at the same address as Pal and Katalin.  I am looking to find Pal's parents and siblings as well as any other wives and children.  Does anyone on this list have ancestry from Plavinca or have Vidas in their family tree?

                          Thank you,

                          Andrea

                        • Jill's Slovakian Genealogy
                          Yes, another example for going through the record books: a Polish priest at a Polish Catholic Church in Joliet IL recorded my Polish great grandmother s maiden
                          Message 12 of 12 , Aug 23, 2014
                            Yes, another example for going through the record books: a Polish priest at a Polish Catholic Church in Joliet IL recorded my Polish great grandmother's maiden name as Tomaszewska on earlier records and Matuszewska on later records. Dyslexic? She was only married once when she was very young.  We still can't explain it but the Matuszewska is what we believe to be correct.

                            Best Regards,
                            Jill A Baty


                            On Aug 19, 2014, at 12:03 PM, "david1law@... [SLOVAK-ROOTS]" <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                             

                            I agree with what Catherine said about looking page-by-page through the records because the transcription of the surname may actually appear different than expected.  For one of my ancestral villages, the parish records recorded the surname about a dozen different ways, and it was the same surname, as the records when compared showed the same spouse, same house number, etc.  While the research may take longer, once you find the right ancestral village, I would highly recommend not only a page-by-page review, but also the cluster genealogy approach (making note of all members of a family in that parish, and all possible variants in the name).I hope that this helps a little.
                             
                            Best regards,
                             
                            David Baloga
                             
                            In a message dated 8/18/2014 10:11:57 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com writes:
                             

                            The other problem that was pointed out to me on one of the forums is that Family search only uses Soundex which has a lot of limitations.  For example   in Hungarian Micar and Miczar are the same pronunciation (one is just an archaic version) but Family Search will not pick up on this.  You have to try all possible variations and also  think about how a transcriber might misinterpret a letter.  For example one of my ancestors has the surname Styava.    It is transcribed in the Hungarian Catholic records as Isjava.    Took me a while to stop searching for the non-existent Isjava family.  It was only when I ordered the records and looked at it my self that the mystery was solved.  Other benefits of physically looking through the records are that the surname spelling may have changed over time, names of godparents may provide clues as to the extended famiy and of course house numbers can be very useful..

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