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Re: where is this or what is it? Kassa

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  • T
    Ok so I have found my greatgrandfather,s (Mike juyko) petition for citizenship papers online and in his words he was born in kassaroce Austria. Probably the
    Message 1 of 16 , May 20, 2013
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      Ok so I have found my greatgrandfather,s (Mike juyko) petition for citizenship papers online and in his words he was born in kassaroce Austria. Probably the same place, but what does roce stand for? Also I think he was born in what is now Slovakia and his family moved to just outside prague later on when his father
      (John) became an importer/exporter or a merchant of some sort. Grandma said he was always talking about living in the countryside outside Prague. I also remember her saying that he was sent to America in 1912 when he was 15 to live with his aunt pavloka in Tacoma. That is all I can remember at the moment.

      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@...> wrote:
      >
      > I also know that they wrote letters back and forth for a long time but when Hitler came to power and WWII started they never heard from them again.
      >
      > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > I beleve that they spoke Slovak and I do know that grandma beloned to a slovak Catholic ladies group when she lived in Tacoma WA.
      > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, ctverdov <Tverdov@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ctverdov
      > > > tvegroup..
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > -----Original Message-----
      > > > From: ctverdov <tverdov@>
      > > > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
      > > > Sent: Fri, May 10, 2013 11:17 pm
      > > > Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: where is this or what is it? Kassa
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Hi,
      > > >
      > > > My grandmother was born in Kassa ( pronounced Kasha) in 1901. At that time it was still part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. After World War I it became part of Czechoslovakia. Today it is called Kosice and is located in Slovakia. They are one and the same places.
      > > >
      > > > I hope this helps.
      > > >
      > > > Catherine
      > > >
      > > > ctverdov
      > > > tverdov@
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > -----Original Message-----
      > > > From: treimer <treimer@>
      > > > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
      > > > Sent: Tue, May 7, 2013 7:26 am
      > > > Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: where is this or what is it? Kassa
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Kassa (pronounced Kasha) would be the Magyar pronunciation (Kaschau in German). Today's Slovakia was always home to many ethnic groups. The start is indeed, what language did your grandparents speak at home? Which ethnic clubs, if any, did they attend here? If they were ethnic Germans, I might be able to provide some leads.
      > > >
      > > > Thomas
      > > >
      > > > ---- Ron <amiak27@> wrote:
      > > > > In addition to what Julie suggested, I hope you can give us some additional hints to locate the area. What language did the family speak at home? Was it Czech? Slovak? Was there a second language? Were there any other hints, family stories about home, church or history, conflict or prejudice with other groups or peoples? Did they have a dislike for a neighboring nationality?
      > > > >
      > > > > My earlier guess that "kasha" might be "Kassa" is because Slovak (and Czech somewhat)is a phonetic language, and sometimes words change a bit in local dialect or softening of a sound. Other times distances are mixed up (in this case I was jumping 400 miles due to the sound!)
      > > > >
      > > > > Another source to check is the Delphi forum at
      > > > > http://forums.delphiforums.com/iarelative
      > > > > which has some good Czech sleuths on board. If you do have additional hints we asked for, share them there as well!
      > > > >
      > > > > Ron
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > On a piece of paper my grandma wrote "my father was born in kasha rotsa Czechoslovakia". I think it mentioned it being 30 or 50 miles from prauge, I can't remember which. I have no idea what this means or if its a place or what. I thought kasha was a type of hot cereal. Can someone help with this?
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > ------------------------------------
      > > > >
      > > > > PLEASE STAY ON-TOPIC (GENEALOGY). OFF-TOPIC ITEMS WILL BE BLOCKED.
      > > > >
      > > > > To visit your group on the web, go to:
      > > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
      > > > >
      > > > > To unsubscribe from this group, go to http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@! Groups Links
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Julie Michutka
      So far, there has been absolutely no solid reason (unless I ve missed a post) to equate kasha rotsa with Kosice. Lots of towns start with something that
      Message 2 of 16 , May 22, 2013
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        So far, there has been absolutely no solid reason (unless I've missed a post) to equate "kasha rotsa" with Kosice. Lots of towns start with something that sounds like "kash-".

        Can you point us to the online location of his naturalization papers? Have you found his passenger manifest? And this aunt Pavloka--have you tried to research her, to see where she came from?

        It would be very helpful if you could give us more info--his dates of b/m/d, locations in US, etc. Religion, too.

        I went hunting myself. I did find the naturalization petition at Ancestry, "Selected US Naturalization Records--Original Documents 1790-1974" > Washington > Superior Court, Pirece County. It says "Kassaroce, Austria" pretty clearly, but the handwriting does not appear to match Juyko's signature and so might be what the writier heard rather than a known spelling. It also gives his immigration info as arriving on the Pretoria at Philadelphia on 21 July 1912.

        The manifest of the Pretoria shows a Michal Gojka age 16, a Slovak from Kaszerowac (Hungary), born in Kaszerowac, leaving behind his father Franz in Kaszerowac. He's going to a friend Franz Tomas, in Johnstown, and is traveling with a young woman who is joining her husband Janos Tomas.

        Doing some more creative searching by names and town names on SteveMorse.org, and hunting through the index of Nazvy Obci Slovenskej Republiky, I think it *likely* that the town is present-day Kozarovce (once known as Koscharowetz), due east of Nitra by a little bit. But more work must be done to definitively tie this individual to this town.

        I'll let the rest of you play with this further, to the extent possible without more information about the individual and other relatives who immigrated.

        ~ Julie Michutka


        On May 21, 2013, at 1:38 AM, T wrote:

        > Ok so I have found my greatgrandfather,s (Mike juyko) petition for citizenship papers online and in his words he was born in kassaroce Austria. Probably the same place, but what does roce stand for? Also I think he was born in what is now Slovakia and his family moved to just outside prague later on when his father
        > (John) became an importer/exporter or a merchant of some sort. Grandma said he was always talking about living in the countryside outside Prague. I also remember her saying that he was sent to America in 1912 when he was 15 to live with his aunt pavloka in Tacoma. That is all I can remember at the moment.
        >
        > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> I also know that they wrote letters back and forth for a long time but when Hitler came to power and WWII started they never heard from them again.
        >>
        >> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
        >>>
        >>>
        >>> I beleve that they spoke Slovak and I do know that grandma beloned to a slovak Catholic ladies group when she lived in Tacoma WA.
        >>> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, ctverdov <Tverdov@> wrote:
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>> ctverdov
        >>>> tvegroup..
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>> -----Original Message-----
        >>>> From: ctverdov <tverdov@>
        >>>> To: SLOVAK-ROOTS <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
        >>>> Sent: Fri, May 10, 2013 11:17 pm
        >>>> Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: where is this or what is it? Kassa
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>> Hi,
        >>>>
        >>>> My grandmother was born in Kassa ( pronounced Kasha) in 1901. At that time it was still part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. After World War I it became part of Czechoslovakia. Today it is called Kosice and is located in Slovakia. They are one and the same places.
        >>>>
        >>>> I hope this helps.
        >>>>
        >>>> Catherine
        >>>>
        >>>> ctverdov
        >>>> tverdov@
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>> -----Original Message-----
        >>>> From: treimer <treimer@>
        >>>> To: SLOVAK-ROOTS <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
        >>>> Sent: Tue, May 7, 2013 7:26 am
        >>>> Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: where is this or what is it? Kassa
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>> Kassa (pronounced Kasha) would be the Magyar pronunciation (Kaschau in German). Today's Slovakia was always home to many ethnic groups. The start is indeed, what language did your grandparents speak at home? Which ethnic clubs, if any, did they attend here? If they were ethnic Germans, I might be able to provide some leads.
        >>>>
        >>>> Thomas
        >>>>
        >>>> ---- Ron <amiak27@> wrote:
        >>>>> In addition to what Julie suggested, I hope you can give us some additional hints to locate the area. What language did the family speak at home? Was it Czech? Slovak? Was there a second language? Were there any other hints, family stories about home, church or history, conflict or prejudice with other groups or peoples? Did they have a dislike for a neighboring nationality?
        >>>>>
        >>>>> My earlier guess that "kasha" might be "Kassa" is because Slovak (and Czech somewhat)is a phonetic language, and sometimes words change a bit in local dialect or softening of a sound. Other times distances are mixed up (in this case I was jumping 400 miles due to the sound!)
        >>>>>
        >>>>> Another source to check is the Delphi forum at
        >>>>> http://forums.delphiforums.com/iarelative
        >>>>> which has some good Czech sleuths on board. If you do have additional hints we asked for, share them there as well!
        >>>>>
        >>>>> Ron
        >>>>>
        >>>>> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
        >>>>>>
        >>>>>> On a piece of paper my grandma wrote "my father was born in kasha rotsa Czechoslovakia". I think it mentioned it being 30 or 50 miles from prauge, I can't remember which. I have no idea what this means or if its a place or what. I thought kasha was a type of hot cereal. Can someone help with this?
        >>>>>>
        >>>>>
        >
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • T
        My great grandfather could not speak English at all when he came so I assume he could not write it either? As far as I know his fathers name was john juyko(
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 10, 2013
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          My great grandfather could not speak English at all when he came so I assume he could not write it either? As far as I know his fathers name was john juyko( maybe spelled different but this is what I was told) his mothers name was Maria (Mary) Kocak. He had a lot of brothers and sisters but only one besides him made it out of childhood and I think his name was Andrew, I don't know if he was older or younger. His father was born in Kararotea, Slovakia and his mother was born in Zapalovce, Slovakia she was young when she died and there may have been a step mother in there somewhere but I don't know much more than that.
          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:
          >
          > So far, there has been absolutely no solid reason (unless I've missed a post) to equate "kasha rotsa" with Kosice. Lots of towns start with something that sounds like "kash-".
          >
          > Can you point us to the online location of his naturalization papers? Have you found his passenger manifest? And this aunt Pavloka--have you tried to research her, to see where she came from?
          >
          > It would be very helpful if you could give us more info--his dates of b/m/d, locations in US, etc. Religion, too.
          >
          > I went hunting myself. I did find the naturalization petition at Ancestry, "Selected US Naturalization Records--Original Documents 1790-1974" > Washington > Superior Court, Pirece County. It says "Kassaroce, Austria" pretty clearly, but the handwriting does not appear to match Juyko's signature and so might be what the writier heard rather than a known spelling. It also gives his immigration info as arriving on the Pretoria at Philadelphia on 21 July 1912.
          >
          > The manifest of the Pretoria shows a Michal Gojka age 16, a Slovak from Kaszerowac (Hungary), born in Kaszerowac, leaving behind his father Franz in Kaszerowac. He's going to a friend Franz Tomas, in Johnstown, and is traveling with a young woman who is joining her husband Janos Tomas.
          >
          > Doing some more creative searching by names and town names on SteveMorse.org, and hunting through the index of Nazvy Obci Slovenskej Republiky, I think it *likely* that the town is present-day Kozarovce (once known as Koscharowetz), due east of Nitra by a little bit. But more work must be done to definitively tie this individual to this town.
          >
          > I'll let the rest of you play with this further, to the extent possible without more information about the individual and other relatives who immigrated.
          >
          > ~ Julie Michutka
          >
          >
          > On May 21, 2013, at 1:38 AM, T wrote:
          >
          > > Ok so I have found my greatgrandfather,s (Mike juyko) petition for citizenship papers online and in his words he was born in kassaroce Austria. Probably the same place, but what does roce stand for? Also I think he was born in what is now Slovakia and his family moved to just outside prague later on when his father
          > > (John) became an importer/exporter or a merchant of some sort. Grandma said he was always talking about living in the countryside outside Prague. I also remember her saying that he was sent to America in 1912 when he was 15 to live with his aunt pavloka in Tacoma. That is all I can remember at the moment.
          > >
          > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
          > >>
          > >> I also know that they wrote letters back and forth for a long time but when Hitler came to power and WWII started they never heard from them again.
          > >>
          > >> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
          > >>>
          > >>>
          > >>> I beleve that they spoke Slovak and I do know that grandma beloned to a slovak Catholic ladies group when she lived in Tacoma WA.
          > >>> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, ctverdov <Tverdov@> wrote:
          > >>>>
          > >>>>
          > >>>>
          > >>>>
          > >>>> ctverdov
          > >>>> tvegroup..
          > >>>>
          > >>>>
          > >>>>
          > >>>> -----Original Message-----
          > >>>> From: ctverdov <tverdov@>
          > >>>> To: SLOVAK-ROOTS <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
          > >>>> Sent: Fri, May 10, 2013 11:17 pm
          > >>>> Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: where is this or what is it? Kassa
          > >>>>
          > >>>>
          > >>>> Hi,
          > >>>>
          > >>>> My grandmother was born in Kassa ( pronounced Kasha) in 1901. At that time it was still part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. After World War I it became part of Czechoslovakia. Today it is called Kosice and is located in Slovakia. They are one and the same places.
          > >>>>
          > >>>> I hope this helps.
          > >>>>
          > >>>> Catherine
          > >>>>
          > >>>> ctverdov
          > >>>> tverdov@
          > >>>>
          > >>>>
          > >>>>
          > >>>> -----Original Message-----
          > >>>> From: treimer <treimer@>
          > >>>> To: SLOVAK-ROOTS <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
          > >>>> Sent: Tue, May 7, 2013 7:26 am
          > >>>> Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: where is this or what is it? Kassa
          > >>>>
          > >>>>
          > >>>>
          > >>>>
          > >>>>
          > >>>>
          > >>>> Kassa (pronounced Kasha) would be the Magyar pronunciation (Kaschau in German). Today's Slovakia was always home to many ethnic groups. The start is indeed, what language did your grandparents speak at home? Which ethnic clubs, if any, did they attend here? If they were ethnic Germans, I might be able to provide some leads.
          > >>>>
          > >>>> Thomas
          > >>>>
          > >>>> ---- Ron <amiak27@> wrote:
          > >>>>> In addition to what Julie suggested, I hope you can give us some additional hints to locate the area. What language did the family speak at home? Was it Czech? Slovak? Was there a second language? Were there any other hints, family stories about home, church or history, conflict or prejudice with other groups or peoples? Did they have a dislike for a neighboring nationality?
          > >>>>>
          > >>>>> My earlier guess that "kasha" might be "Kassa" is because Slovak (and Czech somewhat)is a phonetic language, and sometimes words change a bit in local dialect or softening of a sound. Other times distances are mixed up (in this case I was jumping 400 miles due to the sound!)
          > >>>>>
          > >>>>> Another source to check is the Delphi forum at
          > >>>>> http://forums.delphiforums.com/iarelative
          > >>>>> which has some good Czech sleuths on board. If you do have additional hints we asked for, share them there as well!
          > >>>>>
          > >>>>> Ron
          > >>>>>
          > >>>>> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
          > >>>>>>
          > >>>>>> On a piece of paper my grandma wrote "my father was born in kasha rotsa Czechoslovakia". I think it mentioned it being 30 or 50 miles from prauge, I can't remember which. I have no idea what this means or if its a place or what. I thought kasha was a type of hot cereal. Can someone help with this?
          > >>>>>>
          > >>>>>
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Frank R Plichta
          I don t know if someone has discounted the following or not but---- You are looking for kash- something. Well Kaschau is the German name for Kosice (Slovak
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 10, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            I don't know if someone has discounted the following or not but----

            You are looking for "kash-" something.

            Well Kaschau is the German name for Kosice (Slovak Name) also known as Kassa
            (Magyar name) or Cassovia (Latin name).



            "Kasha rosta" does not appear in "Vlastivedny' Slovni'k Obci' na Slovensku."



            Frank Plichta

            "Searching the world for PLICHTAs"



            _____

            From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf Of T
            Sent: Monday, June 10, 2013 10:02 PM
            To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [S-R] Re: not Kassa, was: where is this or what is it?






            My great grandfather could not speak English at all when he came so I assume
            he could not write it either? As far as I know his fathers name was john
            juyko( maybe spelled different but this is what I was told) his mothers name
            was Maria (Mary) Kocak. He had a lot of brothers and sisters but only one
            besides him made it out of childhood and I think his name was Andrew, I
            don't know if he was older or younger. His father was born in Kararotea,
            Slovakia and his mother was born in Zapalovce, Slovakia she was young when
            she died and there may have been a step mother in there somewhere but I
            don't know much more than that.
            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
            , Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:
            >
            > So far, there has been absolutely no solid reason (unless I've missed a
            post) to equate "kasha rotsa" with Kosice. Lots of towns start with
            something that sounds like "kash-".
            >
            > Can you point us to the online location of his naturalization papers? Have
            you found his passenger manifest? And this aunt Pavloka--have you tried to
            research her, to see where she came from?
            >
            > It would be very helpful if you could give us more info--his dates of
            b/m/d, locations in US, etc. Religion, too.
            >
            > I went hunting myself. I did find the naturalization petition at Ancestry,
            "Selected US Naturalization Records--Original Documents 1790-1974" >
            Washington > Superior Court, Pirece County. It says "Kassaroce, Austria"
            pretty clearly, but the handwriting does not appear to match Juyko's
            signature and so might be what the writier heard rather than a known
            spelling. It also gives his immigration info as arriving on the Pretoria at
            Philadelphia on 21 July 1912.
            >
            > The manifest of the Pretoria shows a Michal Gojka age 16, a Slovak from
            Kaszerowac (Hungary), born in Kaszerowac, leaving behind his father Franz in
            Kaszerowac. He's going to a friend Franz Tomas, in Johnstown, and is
            traveling with a young woman who is joining her husband Janos Tomas.
            >
            > Doing some more creative searching by names and town names on
            SteveMorse.org, and hunting through the index of Nazvy Obci Slovenskej
            Republiky, I think it *likely* that the town is present-day Kozarovce (once
            known as Koscharowetz), due east of Nitra by a little bit. But more work
            must be done to definitively tie this individual to this town.
            >
            > I'll let the rest of you play with this further, to the extent possible
            without more information about the individual and other relatives who
            immigrated.
            >
            > ~ Julie Michutka
            >
            >
            > On May 21, 2013, at 1:38 AM, T wrote:
            >
            > > Ok so I have found my greatgrandfather,s (Mike juyko) petition for
            citizenship papers online and in his words he was born in kassaroce Austria.
            Probably the same place, but what does roce stand for? Also I think he was
            born in what is now Slovakia and his family moved to just outside prague
            later on when his father
            > > (John) became an importer/exporter or a merchant of some sort. Grandma
            said he was always talking about living in the countryside outside Prague. I
            also remember her saying that he was sent to America in 1912 when he was 15
            to live with his aunt pavloka in Tacoma. That is all I can remember at the
            moment.
            > >
            > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> , "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
            > >>
            > >> I also know that they wrote letters back and forth for a long time but
            when Hitler came to power and WWII started they never heard from them again.
            > >>
            > >> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> , "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
            > >>>
            > >>>
            > >>> I beleve that they spoke Slovak and I do know that grandma beloned to
            a slovak Catholic ladies group when she lived in Tacoma WA.
            > >>> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> , ctverdov <Tverdov@> wrote:
            > >>>>
            > >>>>
            > >>>>
            > >>>>
            > >>>> ctverdov
            > >>>> tvegroup..
            > >>>>
            > >>>>
            > >>>>
            > >>>> -----Original Message-----
            > >>>> From: ctverdov <tverdov@>
            > >>>> To: SLOVAK-ROOTS <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> >
            > >>>> Sent: Fri, May 10, 2013 11:17 pm
            > >>>> Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: where is this or what is it? Kassa
            > >>>>
            > >>>>
            > >>>> Hi,
            > >>>>
            > >>>> My grandmother was born in Kassa ( pronounced Kasha) in 1901. At that
            time it was still part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. After World War I it
            became part of Czechoslovakia. Today it is called Kosice and is located in
            Slovakia. They are one and the same places.
            > >>>>
            > >>>> I hope this helps.
            > >>>>
            > >>>> Catherine
            > >>>>
            > >>>> ctverdov
            > >>>> tverdov@
            > >>>>
            > >>>>
            > >>>>
            > >>>> -----Original Message-----
            > >>>> From: treimer <treimer@>
            > >>>> To: SLOVAK-ROOTS <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> >
            > >>>> Sent: Tue, May 7, 2013 7:26 am
            > >>>> Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: where is this or what is it? Kassa
            > >>>>
            > >>>>
            > >>>>
            > >>>>
            > >>>>
            > >>>>
            > >>>> Kassa (pronounced Kasha) would be the Magyar pronunciation (Kaschau
            in German). Today's Slovakia was always home to many ethnic groups. The
            start is indeed, what language did your grandparents speak at home? Which
            ethnic clubs, if any, did they attend here? If they were ethnic Germans, I
            might be able to provide some leads.
            > >>>>
            > >>>> Thomas
            > >>>>
            > >>>> ---- Ron <amiak27@> wrote:
            > >>>>> In addition to what Julie suggested, I hope you can give us some
            additional hints to locate the area. What language did the family speak at
            home? Was it Czech? Slovak? Was there a second language? Were there any
            other hints, family stories about home, church or history, conflict or
            prejudice with other groups or peoples? Did they have a dislike for a
            neighboring nationality?
            > >>>>>
            > >>>>> My earlier guess that "kasha" might be "Kassa" is because Slovak
            (and Czech somewhat)is a phonetic language, and sometimes words change a bit
            in local dialect or softening of a sound. Other times distances are mixed up
            (in this case I was jumping 400 miles due to the sound!)
            > >>>>>
            > >>>>> Another source to check is the Delphi forum at
            > >>>>> http://forums.delphiforums.com/iarelative
            > >>>>> which has some good Czech sleuths on board. If you do have
            additional hints we asked for, share them there as well!
            > >>>>>
            > >>>>> Ron
            > >>>>>
            > >>>>> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> , "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
            > >>>>>>
            > >>>>>> On a piece of paper my grandma wrote "my father was born in kasha
            rotsa Czechoslovakia". I think it mentioned it being 30 or 50 miles from
            prauge, I can't remember which. I have no idea what this means or if its a
            place or what. I thought kasha was a type of hot cereal. Can someone help
            with this?
            > >>>>>>
            > >>>>>
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • t.salony
            ... Heidi, If from at least the 1920 Tacoma census until his death in Tacoma in 1966, your ggrandfather went by JAYKO(according to your Ancestry public tree),
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 12, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              >>> "My great grandfather could not speak English at all when he came so I assume he could not write it either? As far as I know his fathers name was john juyko(maybe spelled different but this is what I was told)..." <<<

              Heidi,
              If from at least the 1920 Tacoma census until his death in Tacoma in 1966, your ggrandfather went by JAYKO(according to your Ancestry public tree), that spelling just might help someone trying to help you.
              - QUESTION: How did he pronounce his surname; did it sound like the "jay" as we pronounce bluejay?
              I ask because the letter J when pronounced in Slovak typically sounds like our(U.S.) Y, as in "Yes".
              - QUESTION: How was the above spelling of "juyko" pronounced for you? I'm sure not very knowledgeable in Slovak surnames, but "JUY__" sure looks odd to me. Even in English I can't imagine how it would be said...sounding like "buy"ko or "guy"ko?

              TOM

              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > My great grandfather could not speak English at all when he came so I assume he could not write it either? As far as I know his fathers name was john juyko( maybe spelled different but this is what I was told) his mothers name was Maria (Mary) Kocak. He had a lot of brothers and sisters but only one besides him made it out of childhood and I think his name was Andrew, I don't know if he was older or younger. His father was born in Kararotea, Slovakia and his mother was born in Zapalovce, Slovakia she was young when she died and there may have been a step mother in there somewhere but I don't know much more than that.
              > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Julie Michutka <jmm@> wrote:
              > >
              > > So far, there has been absolutely no solid reason (unless I've missed a post) to equate "kasha rotsa" with Kosice. Lots of towns start with something that sounds like "kash-".
              > >
              > > Can you point us to the online location of his naturalization papers? Have you found his passenger manifest? And this aunt Pavloka--have you tried to research her, to see where she came from?
              > >
              > > It would be very helpful if you could give us more info--his dates of b/m/d, locations in US, etc. Religion, too.
              > >
              > > I went hunting myself. I did find the naturalization petition at Ancestry, "Selected US Naturalization Records--Original Documents 1790-1974" > Washington > Superior Court, Pirece County. It says "Kassaroce, Austria" pretty clearly, but the handwriting does not appear to match Juyko's signature and so might be what the writier heard rather than a known spelling. It also gives his immigration info as arriving on the Pretoria at Philadelphia on 21 July 1912.
              > >
              > > The manifest of the Pretoria shows a Michal Gojka age 16, a Slovak from Kaszerowac (Hungary), born in Kaszerowac, leaving behind his father Franz in Kaszerowac. He's going to a friend Franz Tomas, in Johnstown, and is traveling with a young woman who is joining her husband Janos Tomas.
              > >
              > > Doing some more creative searching by names and town names on SteveMorse.org, and hunting through the index of Nazvy Obci Slovenskej Republiky, I think it *likely* that the town is present-day Kozarovce (once known as Koscharowetz), due east of Nitra by a little bit. But more work must be done to definitively tie this individual to this town.
              > >
              > > I'll let the rest of you play with this further, to the extent possible without more information about the individual and other relatives who immigrated.
              > >
              > > ~ Julie Michutka
              > >
              > >
              > > On May 21, 2013, at 1:38 AM, T wrote:
              > >
              > > > Ok so I have found my greatgrandfather,s (Mike juyko) petition for citizenship papers online and in his words he was born in kassaroce Austria. Probably the same place, but what does roce stand for? Also I think he was born in what is now Slovakia and his family moved to just outside prague later on when his father
              > > > (John) became an importer/exporter or a merchant of some sort. Grandma said he was always talking about living in the countryside outside Prague. I also remember her saying that he was sent to America in 1912 when he was 15 to live with his aunt pavloka in Tacoma. That is all I can remember at the moment.
              > > >
              > > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
              > > >>
              > > >> I also know that they wrote letters back and forth for a long time but when Hitler came to power and WWII started they never heard from them again.
              > > >>
              > > >> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
              > > >>>
              > > >>>
              > > >>> I beleve that they spoke Slovak and I do know that grandma beloned to a slovak Catholic ladies group when she lived in Tacoma WA.
              > > >>> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, ctverdov <Tverdov@> wrote:
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>> ctverdov
              > > >>>> tvegroup..
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>> -----Original Message-----
              > > >>>> From: ctverdov <tverdov@>
              > > >>>> To: SLOVAK-ROOTS <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
              > > >>>> Sent: Fri, May 10, 2013 11:17 pm
              > > >>>> Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: where is this or what is it? Kassa
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>> Hi,
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>> My grandmother was born in Kassa ( pronounced Kasha) in 1901. At that time it was still part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. After World War I it became part of Czechoslovakia. Today it is called Kosice and is located in Slovakia. They are one and the same places.
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>> I hope this helps.
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>> Catherine
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>> ctverdov
              > > >>>> tverdov@
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>> -----Original Message-----
              > > >>>> From: treimer <treimer@>
              > > >>>> To: SLOVAK-ROOTS <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
              > > >>>> Sent: Tue, May 7, 2013 7:26 am
              > > >>>> Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: where is this or what is it? Kassa
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>> Kassa (pronounced Kasha) would be the Magyar pronunciation (Kaschau in German). Today's Slovakia was always home to many ethnic groups. The start is indeed, what language did your grandparents speak at home? Which ethnic clubs, if any, did they attend here? If they were ethnic Germans, I might be able to provide some leads.
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>> Thomas
              > > >>>>
              > > >>>> ---- Ron <amiak27@> wrote:
              > > >>>>> In addition to what Julie suggested, I hope you can give us some additional hints to locate the area. What language did the family speak at home? Was it Czech? Slovak? Was there a second language? Were there any other hints, family stories about home, church or history, conflict or prejudice with other groups or peoples? Did they have a dislike for a neighboring nationality?
              > > >>>>>
              > > >>>>> My earlier guess that "kasha" might be "Kassa" is because Slovak (and Czech somewhat)is a phonetic language, and sometimes words change a bit in local dialect or softening of a sound. Other times distances are mixed up (in this case I was jumping 400 miles due to the sound!)
              > > >>>>>
              > > >>>>> Another source to check is the Delphi forum at
              > > >>>>> http://forums.delphiforums.com/iarelative
              > > >>>>> which has some good Czech sleuths on board. If you do have additional hints we asked for, share them there as well!
              > > >>>>>
              > > >>>>> Ron
              > > >>>>>
              > > >>>>> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
              > > >>>>>>
              > > >>>>>> On a piece of paper my grandma wrote "my father was born in kasha rotsa Czechoslovakia". I think it mentioned it being 30 or 50 miles from prauge, I can't remember which. I have no idea what this means or if its a place or what. I thought kasha was a type of hot cereal. Can someone help with this?
              > > >>>>>>
              > > >>>>>
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
            • William C. Wormuth
              Jajko [Jahee-oh] :  I researched the Ellis Island records and found a Jamos Jayko. there are 2 errors. 1) Jamos should have been Janos [Yahn-ohsh] 2) jayko
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 13, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                Jajko [Jahee-oh] :  I researched the Ellis Island records and found a Jamos Jayko. there are 2 errors.
                1) Jamos should have been Janos [Yahn-ohsh]
                2) jayko should have been Jajko.

                The spelling errors are very confusing unless you can read Slovak.  The bastardization of the name Jako appears in the next passenger, named Gajdos [Gahyee-dohsh]  also spelled with a "y", as Gaydos.

                there are 8 telephone listings in Slovakia and although it doesn't necessarily mean there are not more families there are 8 listed males, (Jajko) and 3 females, (Jajkova [Yayee-koh-vah).

                Male:  http://telefonny.zoznam.sk/Jajko/slovensko/

                Female:  http://telefonny.zoznam.sk/Jajkova/slovensko/

                If your g grandfather had changed the name, I am sure he would have chnged the name to Yayko, as the use of the "J" changes the American pronunciation to "J" as in James [Jay-koh], completely different from the original name.


                ________________________________
                From: t.salony <t.salony@...>
                To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 1:31 AM
                Subject: [S-R] Re: Mike JAYKO , 1897-1966



                 
                >>> "My great grandfather could not speak English at all when he came so I assume he could not write it either? As far as I know his fathers name was john juyko(maybe spelled different but this is what I was told)..." <<<

                Heidi,
                If from at least the 1920 Tacoma census until his death in Tacoma in 1966, your ggrandfather went by JAYKO(according to your Ancestry public tree), that spelling just might help someone trying to help you.
                - QUESTION: How did he pronounce his surname; did it sound like the "jay" as we pronounce bluejay?
                I ask because the letter J when pronounced in Slovak typically sounds like our(U.S.) Y, as in "Yes".
                - QUESTION: How was the above spelling of "juyko" pronounced for you? I'm sure not very knowledgeable in Slovak surnames, but "JUY__" sure looks odd to me. Even in English I can't imagine how it would be said...sounding like "buy"ko or "guy"ko?

                TOM

                --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > My great grandfather could not speak English at all when he came so I assume he could not write it either? As far as I know his fathers name was john juyko( maybe spelled different but this is what I was told) his mothers name was Maria (Mary) Kocak. He had a lot of brothers and sisters but only one besides him made it out of childhood and I think his name was Andrew, I don't know if he was older or younger. His father was born in Kararotea, Slovakia and his mother was born in Zapalovce, Slovakia she was young when she died and there may have been a step mother in there somewhere but I don't know much more than that.
                > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Julie Michutka <jmm@> wrote:
                > >
                > > So far, there has been absolutely no solid reason (unless I've missed a post) to equate "kasha rotsa" with Kosice. Lots of towns start with something that sounds like "kash-".
                > >
                > > Can you point us to the online location of his naturalization papers? Have you found his passenger manifest? And this aunt Pavloka--have you tried to research her, to see where she came from?
                > >
                > > It would be very helpful if you could give us more info--his dates of b/m/d, locations in US, etc. Religion, too.
                > >
                > > I went hunting myself. I did find the naturalization petition at Ancestry, "Selected US Naturalization Records--Original Documents 1790-1974" > Washington > Superior Court, Pirece County. It says "Kassaroce, Austria" pretty clearly, but the handwriting does not appear to match Juyko's signature and so might be what the writier heard rather than a known spelling. It also gives his immigration info as arriving on the Pretoria at Philadelphia on 21 July 1912.
                > >
                > > The manifest of the Pretoria shows a Michal Gojka age 16, a Slovak from Kaszerowac (Hungary), born in Kaszerowac, leaving behind his father Franz in Kaszerowac. He's going to a friend Franz Tomas, in Johnstown, and is traveling with a young woman who is joining her husband Janos Tomas.
                > >
                > > Doing some more creative searching by names and town names on SteveMorse.org, and hunting through the index of Nazvy Obci Slovenskej Republiky, I think it *likely* that the town is present-day Kozarovce (once known as Koscharowetz), due east of Nitra by a little bit. But more work must be done to definitively tie this individual to this town.
                > >
                > > I'll let the rest of you play with this further, to the extent possible without more information about the individual and other relatives who immigrated.
                > >
                > > ~ Julie Michutka
                > >
                > >
                > > On May 21, 2013, at 1:38 AM, T wrote:
                > >
                > > > Ok so I have found my greatgrandfather,s (Mike juyko) petition for citizenship papers online and in his words he was born in kassaroce Austria. Probably the same place, but what does roce stand for? Also I think he was born in what is now Slovakia and his family moved to just outside prague later on when his father
                > > > (John) became an importer/exporter or a merchant of some sort. Grandma said he was always talking about living in the countryside outside Prague. I also remember her saying that he was sent to America in 1912 when he was 15 to live with his aunt pavloka in Tacoma. That is all I can remember at the moment.
                > > >
                > > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
                > > >>
                > > >> I also know that they wrote letters back and forth for a long time but when Hitler came to power and WWII started they never heard from them again.
                > > >>
                > > >> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
                > > >>>
                > > >>>
                > > >>> I beleve that they spoke Slovak and I do know that grandma beloned to a slovak Catholic ladies group when she lived in Tacoma WA.
                > > >>> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, ctverdov <Tverdov@> wrote:
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>> ctverdov
                > > >>>> tvegroup..
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>> -----Original Message-----
                > > >>>> From: ctverdov <tverdov@>
                > > >>>> To: SLOVAK-ROOTS <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
                > > >>>> Sent: Fri, May 10, 2013 11:17 pm
                > > >>>> Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: where is this or what is it? Kassa
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>> Hi,
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>> My grandmother was born in Kassa ( pronounced Kasha) in 1901. At that time it was still part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. After World War I it became part of Czechoslovakia. Today it is called Kosice and is located in Slovakia. They are one and the same places.
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>> I hope this helps.
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>> Catherine
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>> ctverdov
                > > >>>> tverdov@
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>> -----Original Message-----
                > > >>>> From: treimer <treimer@>
                > > >>>> To: SLOVAK-ROOTS <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
                > > >>>> Sent: Tue, May 7, 2013 7:26 am
                > > >>>> Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: where is this or what is it? Kassa
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>> Kassa (pronounced Kasha) would be the Magyar pronunciation (Kaschau in German). Today's Slovakia was always home to many ethnic groups. The start is indeed, what language did your grandparents speak at home? Which ethnic clubs, if any, did they attend here? If they were ethnic Germans, I might be able to provide some leads.
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>> Thomas
                > > >>>>
                > > >>>> ---- Ron <amiak27@> wrote:
                > > >>>>> In addition to what Julie suggested, I hope you can give us some additional hints to locate the area. What language did the family speak at home? Was it Czech? Slovak? Was there a second language? Were there any other hints, family stories about home, church or history, conflict or prejudice with other groups or peoples? Did they have a dislike for a neighboring nationality?
                > > >>>>>
                > > >>>>> My earlier guess that "kasha" might be "Kassa" is because Slovak (and Czech somewhat)is a phonetic language, and sometimes words change a bit in local dialect or softening of a sound. Other times distances are mixed up (in this case I was jumping 400 miles due to the sound!)
                > > >>>>>
                > > >>>>> Another source to check is the Delphi forum at
                > > >>>>> http://forums.delphiforums.com/iarelative
                > > >>>>> which has some good Czech sleuths on board. If you do have additional hints we asked for, share them there as well!
                > > >>>>>
                > > >>>>> Ron
                > > >>>>>
                > > >>>>> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "T" <h_tollefson2001@> wrote:
                > > >>>>>>
                > > >>>>>> On a piece of paper my grandma wrote "my father was born in kasha rotsa Czechoslovakia". I think it mentioned it being 30 or 50 miles from prauge, I can't remember which. I have no idea what this means or if its a place or what. I thought kasha was a type of hot cereal. Can someone help with this?
                > > >>>>>>
                > > >>>>>
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                >




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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