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Re: Vladimirova and Okruhle

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  • t.salony
    Curt, Thanks for the explanation of why it isn t listed in the typically useful resources. And yes, I just found a reference to the village actually being
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 29, 2013
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      Curt,
      Thanks for the explanation of why it isn't listed in the typically useful resources. And yes, I just found a reference to the village actually being what we know as Ladomirova.

      TOM

      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@...> wrote:
      >
      > Tom, et al.
      > Ladomirova is the village, and that is its Rusyn name.
      > After the Russian Revolution some Russian Orthodox clergy were exiled, including Fr. Maximenko, who eventually came to the U.S. and became an archbishop. During a part of his exile he worked in Svidnik and Ladomirova setting up and serving orthodox and converting Greek Catholics. Among these Russians, they called the village Vladimirova, a name for several villages and provincial towns in Russia. This was all unofficial and so is not a part of Hungarian, Slovak, or Rusyn traditions language or history. Thus you won't find it on Cisarik or even the histories of the village.
      >
      > Curt B.
      >
      > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "t.salony" <t.salony@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Regarding "Vladimirova, Czechoslovakia":
      > > It's odd not finding any clue on Cisarik , yet here (if I can copy it correctly) is the first, and maybe only non-surname, reference when searching via Google:
      > >
      > > Builder of the Church – Archbishop Vitaly Maximenko
      > > www.roca.org/OA/98-99/98f.htm
      > > ... the Carpatho-Russian village of Vladimirova, near Czechoslovakia's border with Poland. Many Carpatho-Russians had gone to America temporarily to work, ...
      > >
      > > However, when searching "Vladimirova" on Morse Gold Search, nothing but a couple Yugoslavia results come up. So obviously, there must have been a different name used by those "Many Carpatho-Russians...".
      > > Obviously someone used the name in relation to the village where Archbishop Maximenko was in charge, but I couldn't find it in any Rusyn village list either.
      > > A puzzle.
      > >
      > > TOM
      > >
      > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Patricia Ehret <loqipei@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi,
      > > >
      > > > Does anyone know where Vladimirova, Czecholovakia in 1889 was and if it is one and the same as
      > > > the village Ladomirova?  Also what district/area was Okruhle, Czechoslovakia during early 1900's part of?
      > > >
      > > > Thanks for your help.
      > > >
      > > > Patricia
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Patricia Ehret
      Dear Tom et al, Very interesting.  My great grandfather born in 1889 in what he said was Vladimirova, Czechoslovakia was supposedly Slovak but with a last
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 29, 2013
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        Dear Tom et al,

        Very interesting.  My great grandfather born in 1889 in what he said was "Vladimirova, Czechoslovakia" was supposedly
        Slovak but with a last name like Jastrepsky aren't some names with the suffix "sky" Rusyn do you know?  I did see a town 
        called Jastreb/p in Slovakia and thought sky meant "son of" but I'm not sure?  Can you tell me where the best place to look 
        for the history of this village at this point in time is?  Where did you find your information?

        I really appreciate your input.  Thank you so much!

        Sincerely,

        Patricia


        ________________________________
        From: CurtB <curt67boc@...>
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, March 29, 2013 12:54 PM
        Subject: [S-R] Re: Vladimirova and Okruhle


         
        Tom, et al.
        Ladomirova is the village, and that is its Rusyn name.
        After the Russian Revolution some Russian Orthodox clergy were exiled, including Fr. Maximenko, who eventually came to the U.S. and became an archbishop. During a part of his exile he worked in Svidnik and Ladomirova setting up and serving orthodox and converting Greek Catholics. Among these Russians, they called the village Vladimirova, a name for several villages and provincial towns in Russia. This was all unofficial and so is not a part of Hungarian, Slovak, or Rusyn traditions language or history. Thus you won't find it on Cisarik or even the histories of the village.

        Curt B.

        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "t.salony" <t.salony@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Regarding "Vladimirova, Czechoslovakia":
        > It's odd not finding any clue on Cisarik , yet here (if I can copy it correctly) is the first, and maybe only non-surname, reference when searching via Google:
        >
        > Builder of the Church – Archbishop Vitaly Maximenko
        > www.roca.org/OA/98-99/98f.htm
        > ... the Carpatho-Russian village of Vladimirova, near Czechoslovakia's border with Poland. Many Carpatho-Russians had gone to America temporarily to work, ...
        >
        > However, when searching "Vladimirova" on Morse Gold Search, nothing but a couple Yugoslavia results come up. So obviously, there must have been a different name used by those "Many Carpatho-Russians...".
        > Obviously someone used the name in relation to the village where Archbishop Maximenko was in charge, but I couldn't find it in any Rusyn village list either.
        > A puzzle.
        >
        > TOM
        >
        > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Patricia Ehret <loqipei@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi,
        > >
        > > Does anyone know where Vladimirova, Czecholovakia in 1889 was and if it is one and the same as
        > > the village Ladomirova?  Also what district/area was Okruhle, Czechoslovakia during early 1900's part of?
        > >
        > > Thanks for your help.
        > >
        > > Patricia
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Patricia Ehret
        Also, Tom you said among these Russians which you indicated was after the revolution calling this town Vladimirova. Since my gr. grandfather immigrated much
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 29, 2013
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          Also, Tom you said "among these Russians" which you indicated was after the revolution calling this town Vladimirova.
          Since my gr. grandfather immigrated much before the revolution and had said he was born there, there must have been a history 
          of this town having been called Vladimirova for quite some time for him to have referred to it as such don't you suppose?  I would 
          love to read more about it.

          Patricia


          ________________________________
          From: t.salony <t.salony@...>
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, March 29, 2013 2:06 PM
          Subject: [S-R] Re: Vladimirova and Okruhle


           
          Curt,
          Thanks for the explanation of why it isn't listed in the typically useful resources. And yes, I just found a reference to the village actually being what we know as Ladomirova.

          TOM

          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@...> wrote:
          >
          > Tom, et al.
          > Ladomirova is the village, and that is its Rusyn name.
          > After the Russian Revolution some Russian Orthodox clergy were exiled, including Fr. Maximenko, who eventually came to the U.S. and became an archbishop. During a part of his exile he worked in Svidnik and Ladomirova setting up and serving orthodox and converting Greek Catholics. Among these Russians, they called the village Vladimirova, a name for several villages and provincial towns in Russia. This was all unofficial and so is not a part of Hungarian, Slovak, or Rusyn traditions language or history. Thus you won't find it on Cisarik or even the histories of the village.
          >
          > Curt B.
          >
          > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "t.salony" <t.salony@> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Regarding "Vladimirova, Czechoslovakia":
          > > It's odd not finding any clue on Cisarik , yet here (if I can copy it correctly) is the first, and maybe only non-surname, reference when searching via Google:
          > >
          > > Builder of the Church – Archbishop Vitaly Maximenko
          > > www.roca.org/OA/98-99/98f.htm
          > > ... the Carpatho-Russian village of Vladimirova, near Czechoslovakia's border with Poland. Many Carpatho-Russians had gone to America temporarily to work, ...
          > >
          > > However, when searching "Vladimirova" on Morse Gold Search, nothing but a couple Yugoslavia results come up. So obviously, there must have been a different name used by those "Many Carpatho-Russians...".
          > > Obviously someone used the name in relation to the village where Archbishop Maximenko was in charge, but I couldn't find it in any Rusyn village list either.
          > > A puzzle.
          > >
          > > TOM
          > >
          > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Patricia Ehret <loqipei@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Hi,
          > > >
          > > > Does anyone know where Vladimirova, Czecholovakia in 1889 was and if it is one and the same as
          > > > the village Ladomirova?  Also what district/area was Okruhle, Czechoslovakia during early 1900's part of?
          > > >
          > > > Thanks for your help.
          > > >
          > > > Patricia
          > > >
          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > >
          > >
          >




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Patricia Ehret
          So Kerekret must be the Hungarian name for this town then because my gr. grandfather referred to it much before WWI as Okruhle which must be the Slovak name so
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 29, 2013
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            So Kerekret must be the Hungarian name for this town then because my gr. grandfather referred to it much before WWI
            as Okruhle which must be the Slovak name so it obviously was known as both depending on who was talking as I guess
            all towns were given my understanding.  Thanks for the map link!

            Patricia


            ________________________________
            From: David Colello <dcolello@...>
            To: "SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com" <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, March 28, 2013 10:53 PM
            Subject: Re: [S-R] Vladimirova and Okruhle


             
             
            Okruhle is where my great-grandfather Janos Rokita was from.  It used to be called Kerekret prior to World War I.  As part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in the early 1900's, it was located in Saros megye (or county).
             
            You can see an old map of Saros megye at http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/saros.jpg%c2%a0from 1910.   Kerekret/Okruhle is in the north-east corner of the yellow section on the right, just south of Radoma. 
             
            For a sense of scale, the large city of Eperjes on the map is present-day Presov, Slovakia.
             
            David


            ________________________________
            From: Patricia Ehret <loqipei@...>
            To: "SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.comSLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, March 28, 2013 9:14 PM
            Subject: [S-R] Vladimirova and Okruhle


             

            Hi,

            Does anyone know where Vladimirova, Czecholovakia in 1889 was and if it is one and the same as
            the village Ladomirova?  Also what district/area was Okruhle, Czechoslovakia during early 1900's part of?

            Thanks for your help.

            Patricia

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • MGMojher
            Okrúhle Okruhle includes former villages: | Sapinec | ... OLD NAMES of the village(town): 1773 Kerekréth, Okruhle, 1786 Kerekrét, Okruhle, 1808 Kerekrét,
            Message 5 of 13 , Mar 29, 2013
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              Okrúhle
              Okruhle includes former villages: | Sapinec |
              | SURNAMES from current phonebook in 2005 | SURNAMES from CENSUS in 1715 |


              OLD NAMES of the village(town):
              1773 Kerekréth, Okruhle, 1786 Kerekrét, Okruhle, 1808 Kerekrét, Okruhlé, 1863–1913 Kerekrét, 1920–1973 Okruhlé, 1973– Okrúhle
              Šapinec: 1773 Sapinecz, 1786 Schapinecz, 1808 Sapinecz, Ssapiněc, 1863, 1888–1902 Sapinyec, 1873–1882 Sapinec, 1907–1913 Sápony, 1920 Šapinec, 1927–1964 Šapínec [1964– Šapinec]

              POPULATION of Okruhle in 2005: 641 inhabitants



              From: Patricia Ehret
              Sent: Friday, March 29, 2013 7:32 PM
              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [S-R] Vladimirova and Okruhle


              So Kerekret must be the Hungarian name for this town then because my gr. grandfather referred to it much before WWI
              as Okruhle which must be the Slovak name so it obviously was known as both depending on who was talking as I guess
              all towns were given my understanding. Thanks for the map link!

              Patricia

              ________________________________
              From: David Colello <mailto:dcolello%40yahoo.com>
              To: "mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.commailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thursday, March 28, 2013 10:53 PM
              Subject: Re: [S-R] Vladimirova and Okruhle




              Okruhle is where my great-grandfather Janos Rokita was from. It used to be called Kerekret prior to World War I. As part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in the early 1900's, it was located in Saros megye (or county).

              You can see an old map of Saros megye at http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/saros.jpg from 1910. Kerekret/Okruhle is in the north-east corner of the yellow section on the right, just south of Radoma.

              For a sense of scale, the large city of Eperjes on the map is present-day Presov, Slovakia.

              David

              ________________________________
              From: Patricia Ehret <mailto:loqipei%40yahoo.com>
              To: "mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.comSLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thursday, March 28, 2013 9:14 PM
              Subject: [S-R] Vladimirova and Okruhle



              Hi,

              Does anyone know where Vladimirova, Czecholovakia in 1889 was and if it is one and the same as
              the village Ladomirova? Also what district/area was Okruhle, Czechoslovakia during early 1900's part of?

              Thanks for your help.

              Patricia

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • CurtB
              Patricia, Perhaps you misunderstood my comments. It was here in the United States where most of the people from the area joined the Russian Orthodox church
              Message 6 of 13 , Mar 29, 2013
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                Patricia,
                Perhaps you misunderstood my comments. It was here in the United States where most of the people from the area joined the Russian Orthodox church that they started calling the village Vladimirova. It seemed to catch on, many used it, and you can still find people here using that name for the village. As far as I know it was always called Ladomirova in Hungary and then Slovakia, situated on the Ladomirka river. That is why you can't find citations for the Vladimirova name in any source documents, but only in American usage.

                Curt B.


                --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Patricia Ehret <loqipei@...> wrote:
                >
                > Also, Tom you said "among these Russians" which you indicated was after the revolution calling this town Vladimirova.
                > Since my gr. grandfather immigrated much before the revolution and had said he was born there, there must have been a history 
                > of this town having been called Vladimirova for quite some time for him to have referred to it as such don't you suppose?  I would 
                > love to read more about it.
                >
                > Patricia
                >
                >
                > ________________________________
                > From: t.salony <t.salony@...>
                > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Friday, March 29, 2013 2:06 PM
                > Subject: [S-R] Re: Vladimirova and Okruhle
                >
                >
                >  
                > Curt,
                > Thanks for the explanation of why it isn't listed in the typically useful resources. And yes, I just found a reference to the village actually being what we know as Ladomirova.
                >
                > TOM
                >
                > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Tom, et al.
                > > Ladomirova is the village, and that is its Rusyn name.
                > > After the Russian Revolution some Russian Orthodox clergy were exiled, including Fr. Maximenko, who eventually came to the U.S. and became an archbishop. During a part of his exile he worked in Svidnik and Ladomirova setting up and serving orthodox and converting Greek Catholics. Among these Russians, they called the village Vladimirova, a name for several villages and provincial towns in Russia. This was all unofficial and so is not a part of Hungarian, Slovak, or Rusyn traditions language or history. Thus you won't find it on Cisarik or even the histories of the village.
                > >
                > > Curt B.
                > >
                > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "t.salony" <t.salony@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Regarding "Vladimirova, Czechoslovakia":
                > > > It's odd not finding any clue on Cisarik , yet here (if I can copy it correctly) is the first, and maybe only non-surname, reference when searching via Google:
                > > >
                > > > Builder of the Church â€" Archbishop Vitaly Maximenko
                > > > www.roca.org/OA/98-99/98f.htm
                > > > ... the Carpatho-Russian village of Vladimirova, near Czechoslovakia's border with Poland. Many Carpatho-Russians had gone to America temporarily to work, ...
                > > >
                > > > However, when searching "Vladimirova" on Morse Gold Search, nothing but a couple Yugoslavia results come up. So obviously, there must have been a different name used by those "Many Carpatho-Russians...".
                > > > Obviously someone used the name in relation to the village where Archbishop Maximenko was in charge, but I couldn't find it in any Rusyn village list either.
                > > > A puzzle.
                > > >
                > > > TOM
                > > >
                > > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Patricia Ehret <loqipei@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Hi,
                > > > >
                > > > > Does anyone know where Vladimirova, Czecholovakia in 1889 was and if it is one and the same as
                > > > > the village Ladomirova?  Also what district/area was Okruhle, Czechoslovakia during early 1900's part of?
                > > > >
                > > > > Thanks for your help.
                > > > >
                > > > > Patricia
                > > > >
                > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • John
                ... Would you consider Vladiszlav JACSEMSZKY, BORN 27 fEB 1889? Birth is on page 623/673.
                Message 7 of 13 , Mar 30, 2013
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                  >>> My great grandfather born in 1889 in what he said was ... but with a last name like [Jastrepsky] <<<

                  Would you consider Vladiszlav JACSEMSZKY, BORN 27 fEB 1889?

                  Birth is on page 623/673.

                  https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12318-227192-60?cc=1554443&wc=M99C-8CD:n1985659534
                • vchromoho
                  ... The Brotherhood of St. Job of Pochaev associated with the Orthodox monastery in Ladomirova had a printing press that was very active in disseminating
                  Message 8 of 13 , Apr 6, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Curt, you are mostly right on target about this subject. However, re:

                    >That is why you can't find citations for the Vladimirova name in any source documents, but only in American usage.

                    The Brotherhood of St. Job of Pochaev associated with the Orthodox monastery in Ladomirova had a printing press that was very active in disseminating periodicals, prayerbooks, and other materials to the local Carpatho-Rusyn populace. For example:

                    http://www.worldcat.org/title/pravoslavnaia-karpatskaia-rus/oclc/17266673

                    Pravoslavnaia karpatskaia Rusʹ
                    Author: Bratstvo prep. Iova Pochaevskago.
                    Publisher: Vladimirova, Slovakia : Bratstvo prepodobnago Iova Pochaevskago, 1928-1935.
                    Edition/Format: Journal, magazine : Periodical : State or province government publication : Microfilm : Master microform : Russian

                    Note that the place of publication is "Vladimirova". So this name was used in Ladomirova, and wherever in Czechoslovakia (and the U.S.) these publications were distributed, by this particular community.

                    In 1944 the monastic community fled the advancing Soviet Army and ended up at the Holy Trinity Monastery in Jordanville, New York in 1946. The printery was set up there and continues to be active to the present day.

                    "In 1946, fourteen new monks arrived at Jordanville, headed by Bishop Seraphim (Ivanov). These included some of the future leaders of the Russian Church Abroad, including the future Metropolitan Laurus (Škurla), who was then Novice Vasily.[13] The brotherhood was originally based in the St. Job of Pochaev Monastery in Ladomirová, Czechoslovakia, which had been founded by Archbishop Vitaly when he was still an archimandrite. After a brief stay in Munich, the Brotherhood accepted the invitation of Bishop Vitaly to join the struggling Brotherhood at Jordanville, resulting in the largest Orthodox Monastery in America. The Brotherhood of St. Job brought St. Job's printing press with them across the Atlantic, and, until the fall of the Soviet Union, Holy Trinity Monastery was the only place in the world that could typeset in Church Slavonic."

                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laurus_%28%C5%A0kurla%29

                    You can find many histories of the Jordanville monastery, Metropolitan Laurus, etc., that name Ladomirova as "Vladimirovo," "Vladimirova," or even "Ladimirovo" trying to Russianize it as much as possible.

                    Rich


                    --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Patricia,
                    > Perhaps you misunderstood my comments. It was here in the United States where most of the people from the area joined the Russian Orthodox church that they started calling the village Vladimirova. It seemed to catch on, many used it, and you can still find people here using that name for the village. As far as I know it was always called Ladomirova in Hungary and then Slovakia, situated on the Ladomirka river. That is why you can't find citations for the Vladimirova name in any source documents, but only in American usage.
                    >
                    > Curt B.
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Patricia Ehret <loqipei@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Also, Tom you said "among these Russians" which you indicated was after the revolution calling this town Vladimirova.
                    > > Since my gr. grandfather immigrated much before the revolution and had said he was born there, there must have been a history 
                    > > of this town having been called Vladimirova for quite some time for him to have referred to it as such don't you suppose?  I would 
                    > > love to read more about it.
                    > >
                    > > Patricia
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ________________________________
                    > > From: t.salony <t.salony@>
                    > > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                    > > Sent: Friday, March 29, 2013 2:06 PM
                    > > Subject: [S-R] Re: Vladimirova and Okruhle
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >  
                    > > Curt,
                    > > Thanks for the explanation of why it isn't listed in the typically useful resources. And yes, I just found a reference to the village actually being what we know as Ladomirova.
                    > >
                    > > TOM
                    > >
                    > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Tom, et al.
                    > > > Ladomirova is the village, and that is its Rusyn name.
                    > > > After the Russian Revolution some Russian Orthodox clergy were exiled, including Fr. Maximenko, who eventually came to the U.S. and became an archbishop. During a part of his exile he worked in Svidnik and Ladomirova setting up and serving orthodox and converting Greek Catholics. Among these Russians, they called the village Vladimirova, a name for several villages and provincial towns in Russia. This was all unofficial and so is not a part of Hungarian, Slovak, or Rusyn traditions language or history. Thus you won't find it on Cisarik or even the histories of the village.
                    > > >
                    > > > Curt B.
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "t.salony" <t.salony@> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Regarding "Vladimirova, Czechoslovakia":
                    > > > > It's odd not finding any clue on Cisarik , yet here (if I can copy it correctly) is the first, and maybe only non-surname, reference when searching via Google:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Builder of the Church â€" Archbishop Vitaly Maximenko
                    > > > > www.roca.org/OA/98-99/98f.htm
                    > > > > ... the Carpatho-Russian village of Vladimirova, near Czechoslovakia's border with Poland. Many Carpatho-Russians had gone to America temporarily to work, ...
                    > > > >
                    > > > > However, when searching "Vladimirova" on Morse Gold Search, nothing but a couple Yugoslavia results come up. So obviously, there must have been a different name used by those "Many Carpatho-Russians...".
                    > > > > Obviously someone used the name in relation to the village where Archbishop Maximenko was in charge, but I couldn't find it in any Rusyn village list either.
                    > > > > A puzzle.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > TOM
                    > > > >
                    > > > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Patricia Ehret <loqipei@> wrote:
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Hi,
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Does anyone know where Vladimirova, Czecholovakia in 1889 was and if it is one and the same as
                    > > > > > the village Ladomirova?  Also what district/area was Okruhle, Czechoslovakia during early 1900's part of?
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Thanks for your help.
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Patricia
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