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Belnay - Slavish

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  • Ron
    Lynne, Centering on your question of Slavish, I refer you to Prof. Votruba at http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/qsonhist/slavicslovak.html which most all of us
    Message 1 of 30 , Mar 10, 2013
      Lynne,

      Centering on your question of Slavish, I refer you to Prof. Votruba at
      http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/qsonhist/slavicslovak.html

      which most all of us would agree is likely the most authoritative and complete answer you will find.

      That is drilling down pretty deep into his great information, and certainly reading through his web site, the questions and the answers, is a great start to learning many, many things about our ancestors. Two more general addresses to his site are:

      http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/qsonhist/qsonhist.html
      for queries on History, and

      http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/ for his full web site.

      You can also go to our Yahoo Groups website for Slovak Roots and use the search function to draw up past discussions on any key word, or do the same at Slovak World.

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/ and
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/

      Dr Votruba does not keep his writings static, but is adding and expanding them as time goes. He also opened a discussion forum to compliment Slovak World at
      https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/slovak-spot

      Good reading! Our ancestors led interesting lives and our hunt is fascinating with the variety of cultures, languages and varieties of place names in each language. We have Slovak, Hungarian, Latin, German and Rusyn.Cyrillic to deal with, and perhaps a few more - Polish in some circumstances, Czech, and varieties of Cyrillic languages / dialects depending upon time, politics and location. It is as much fun as if we came from center of the Lord of the Ring series.

      Ron



      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Lynne Wilson <sandalfoot0505@...> wrote:
      >
      > Well, I certainly need to learn my history! I mean world history in general.
      >
      > Thank you for this information.
      >
      > I am looking forward to digging deeper and coming up with my true ancestry!
      >
      > Something rather odd, is that my father and several of my father's friends
      > often referred to themselves as "Slavish." Does this mean anything to you?
      > Have you ever heard "Slavish" before? Maybe anglicizing "Slovak". It sounds
      > to me that they were Slovak!
      >
      > I am thinking somewhere in their history in the USA somebody decided they
      > were Czech, with the coming of Czechoslovakia after WW1 and that was that.
      > But I do need to do more research to get to the bottom of this!
      >
      > Thank you so much once again.
      >
      > Lynne
      >
    • MGMojher
      Ron, Your comment, “It is as much fun as if we came from center of the Lord of the Rings series.” brought to mind that Slovakia is “Middle Earth.” In
      Message 2 of 30 , Mar 10, 2013
        Ron,
        Your comment, “It is as much fun as if we came from center of the Lord of the Rings series.” brought to mind that Slovakia is “Middle Earth.” In that Slovakia has a claim to the geographical center of Europe. That is why they hate to be referred to as being in Eastern Europe. Being at the crossroads of many major trade routes exposed Slovakia to many cultures.
        My own ancestral village was ruled by Plavec Castle which controlled a trade road that came from Poland.
        I once viewed a film on dragons. Its approach that dragons were real and it explained scientifically how they were able to fly and breath fire. The surprising part of the film is that the last stronghold of dragons was in the Carpathian Mountains. Shades of Slovakia. If you have ever been in the High Tatras you could believe dragons would have lived there.
        Fun stuff.

        From: Ron
        Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 4:58 PM
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [S-R] Belnay - Slavish


        Lynne,

        Centering on your question of Slavish, I refer you to Prof. Votruba at
        http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/qsonhist/slavicslovak.html

        which most all of us would agree is likely the most authoritative and complete answer you will find.

        That is drilling down pretty deep into his great information, and certainly reading through his web site, the questions and the answers, is a great start to learning many, many things about our ancestors. Two more general addresses to his site are:

        http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/qsonhist/qsonhist.html
        for queries on History, and

        http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/ for his full web site.

        You can also go to our Yahoo Groups website for Slovak Roots and use the search function to draw up past discussions on any key word, or do the same at Slovak World.

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/ and
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/

        Dr Votruba does not keep his writings static, but is adding and expanding them as time goes. He also opened a discussion forum to compliment Slovak World at
        https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/slovak-spot

        Good reading! Our ancestors led interesting lives and our hunt is fascinating with the variety of cultures, languages and varieties of place names in each language. We have Slovak, Hungarian, Latin, German and Rusyn.Cyrillic to deal with, and perhaps a few more - Polish in some circumstances, Czech, and varieties of Cyrillic languages / dialects depending upon time, politics and location. It is as much fun as if we came from center of the Lord of the Ring series.

        Ron

        --- In mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com, Lynne Wilson <sandalfoot0505@...> wrote:
        >
        > Well, I certainly need to learn my history! I mean world history in general.
        >
        > Thank you for this information.
        >
        > I am looking forward to digging deeper and coming up with my true ancestry!
        >
        > Something rather odd, is that my father and several of my father's friends
        > often referred to themselves as "Slavish." Does this mean anything to you?
        > Have you ever heard "Slavish" before? Maybe anglicizing "Slovak". It sounds
        > to me that they were Slovak!
        >
        > I am thinking somewhere in their history in the USA somebody decided they
        > were Czech, with the coming of Czechoslovakia after WW1 and that was that.
        > But I do need to do more research to get to the bottom of this!
        >
        > Thank you so much once again.
        >
        > Lynne
        >





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • htcstech
        I came across this in a historical work. Wikipedia has a short entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_of_the_Dragon Peter M. ... [Non-text portions of this
        Message 3 of 30 , Mar 10, 2013
          I came across this in a historical work. Wikipedia has a short entry:
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_of_the_Dragon

          Peter M.

          On 11 March 2013 12:15, MGMojher <mgmojher@...> wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > Ron,
          > Your comment, “It is as much fun as if we came from center of the Lord of
          > the Rings series.” brought to mind that Slovakia is “Middle Earth.” In that
          > Slovakia has a claim to the geographical center of Europe. That is why they
          > hate to be referred to as being in Eastern Europe. Being at the crossroads
          > of many major trade routes exposed Slovakia to many cultures.
          > My own ancestral village was ruled by Plavec Castle which controlled a
          > trade road that came from Poland.
          > I once viewed a film on dragons. Its approach that dragons were real and
          > it explained scientifically how they were able to fly and breath fire. The
          > surprising part of the film is that the last stronghold of dragons was in
          > the Carpathian Mountains. Shades of Slovakia. If you have ever been in the
          > High Tatras you could believe dragons would have lived there.
          > Fun stuff.
          >
          > From: Ron
          > Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 4:58 PM
          > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [S-R] Belnay - Slavish
          >
          >
          > Lynne,
          >
          > Centering on your question of Slavish, I refer you to Prof. Votruba at
          > http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/qsonhist/slavicslovak.html
          >
          > which most all of us would agree is likely the most authoritative and
          > complete answer you will find.
          >
          > That is drilling down pretty deep into his great information, and
          > certainly reading through his web site, the questions and the answers, is a
          > great start to learning many, many things about our ancestors. Two more
          > general addresses to his site are:
          >
          > http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/qsonhist/qsonhist.html
          > for queries on History, and
          >
          > http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/ for his full web site.
          >
          > You can also go to our Yahoo Groups website for Slovak Roots and use the
          > search function to draw up past discussions on any key word, or do the same
          > at Slovak World.
          >
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/ and
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/
          >
          > Dr Votruba does not keep his writings static, but is adding and expanding
          > them as time goes. He also opened a discussion forum to compliment Slovak
          > World at
          > https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/slovak-spot
          >
          > Good reading! Our ancestors led interesting lives and our hunt is
          > fascinating with the variety of cultures, languages and varieties of place
          > names in each language. We have Slovak, Hungarian, Latin, German and
          > Rusyn.Cyrillic to deal with, and perhaps a few more - Polish in some
          > circumstances, Czech, and varieties of Cyrillic languages / dialects
          > depending upon time, politics and location. It is as much fun as if we came
          > from center of the Lord of the Ring series.
          >
          > Ron
          >
          > --- In mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com, Lynne Wilson
          > <sandalfoot0505@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Well, I certainly need to learn my history! I mean world history in
          > general.
          > >
          > > Thank you for this information.
          > >
          > > I am looking forward to digging deeper and coming up with my true
          > ancestry!
          > >
          > > Something rather odd, is that my father and several of my father's
          > friends
          > > often referred to themselves as "Slavish." Does this mean anything to
          > you?
          > > Have you ever heard "Slavish" before? Maybe anglicizing "Slovak". It
          > sounds
          > > to me that they were Slovak!
          > >
          > > I am thinking somewhere in their history in the USA somebody decided they
          > > were Czech, with the coming of Czechoslovakia after WW1 and that was
          > that.
          > > But I do need to do more research to get to the bottom of this!
          > >
          > > Thank you so much once again.
          > >
          > > Lynne
          > >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • t.salony
          Zuzana, I understand what you are explaining and suggesting, but with one major question: Are you saying that there IS/WAS a place with the spelling of
          Message 4 of 30 , Mar 10, 2013
            Zuzana,
            I understand what you are explaining and suggesting, but with one major question: Are you saying that there IS/WAS a place with the spelling of "Vrbovica"? I always use the Cisarik site ( http://www.cisarik.com/0_all-villages-V.html ) and I can't find that spelling anywhere.

            TOM

            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Zuzana Peer <zuzana177@...> wrote:
            >
            > Lynne,
            > I have to replay to this:
            > ... I have the records from the ship (Kronprinz Wilhelm) they arrived in,
            > > > departing from Bremen.
            > > > Coming thru EIlis Island in 1903 a Peter BELNAY from Verbicz.
            > > > The village of Verbicz is Vrbica and now part of town of Liptovsky
            > > > Mikulas....
            > Of course your Grandfather was Peter Belnay from Verbicz, but this is in Hungarian language. Your father's name was probably Peter Belnaj from Vrbovica - in Slovak. During "Hungary" time, Slovaks were pressed (for many, many years) to speak Hungarian which they never did. Their language was Slovak and they always spoke Slovak at home and in their villages. But the public records including Registers were writen in Hungarian and they also tryed to change (translate to Hungarian) their beautiful Slovak names and surnames. One of my Great..Granfather's name was Pavol Dudak, they changed his name to Pal Gyugyak !? Another ancestor was Alzbeta Cervenan from Soblahov, her name was "translated" to Ersebeth Cservenyan from Czobolyfalu !?
            > Your GGF had Austro-Hungarian passport in 1903 and his name and village was of course "translated".... In 1918, when Czechoslovakia was established, people started to use their real Slovak names and surnames.
            > Vrbica means in Slovak language place, where were many willows (vrba=willow). It was probably small place, because today it is a part of Liptovsky Mikulas.
            > About your Grandparents speaking Czech. During Czechoslovakia time (1918-1992)many people use to say: "you are Czech" because saying "Czechoslovak"was too long. Or some use to say: "you speak Czech", because they were lazy to say "Czech and Slovak". Some people (mostly foreigners) didn't know that in Czechoslovakia Czechs spoke in Czech and Slovaks spoke in Slovak. What do you think about this idea?
            > Zuzana (born in Czechoslovakia)
            >
            >
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: John <johnqadam@...>
            > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Saturday, March 9, 2013 7:38 PM
            > Subject: Re: [S-R] Belnay
            >
            >  
            >
            > That's exactly what it should say.
            >
            > --- In mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com, Lynne Wilson <sandalfoot0505@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Oh, my, I just made a discovery!
            > >
            > > I located the Belnay family Bible, with notes that my mother had made!
            > >
            > > She wrote that both Julius and John Belnay (my fathers older brothers) were
            > > born in Austria-Hungary.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Zuzana Peer
            Exuce me Tom, I made mistake. Vrbica is correct not Vrbovica. Zuzana ________________________________ From: t.salony To:
            Message 5 of 30 , Mar 10, 2013
              Exuce me Tom, I made mistake. Vrbica is correct not Vrbovica.
              Zuzana


              ________________________________
              From: t.salony <t.salony@...>
              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 8:53 PM
              Subject: Re: [S-R] Belnay


               

              Zuzana,
              I understand what you are explaining and suggesting, but with one major question: Are you saying that there IS/WAS a place with the spelling of "Vrbovica"? I always use the Cisarik site ( http://www.cisarik.com/0_all-villages-V.html ) and I can't find that spelling anywhere.

              TOM

              --- In mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com, Zuzana Peer <zuzana177@...> wrote:
              >
              > Lynne,
              > I have to replay to this:
              > ... I have the records from the ship (Kronprinz Wilhelm) they arrived in,
              > > > departing from Bremen.
              > > > Coming thru EIlis Island in 1903 a Peter BELNAY from Verbicz.
              > > > The village of Verbicz is Vrbica and now part of town of Liptovsky
              > > > Mikulas....
              > Of course your Grandfather was Peter Belnay from Verbicz, but this is in Hungarian language. Your father's name was probably Peter Belnaj from Vrbica (not Vrbovica) - in Slovak. During "Hungary" time, Slovaks were pressed (for many, many years) to speak Hungarian which they never did. Their language was Slovak and they always spoke Slovak at home and in their villages. But the public records including Registers were writen in Hungarian and they also tryed to change (translate to Hungarian) their beautiful Slovak names and surnames. One of my Great..Granfather's name was Pavol Dudak, they changed his name to Pal Gyugyak !? Another ancestor was Alzbeta Cervenan from Soblahov, her name was "translated" to Ersebeth Cservenyan from Czobolyfalu !?
              > Your GGF had Austro-Hungarian passport in 1903 and his name and village was of course "translated".... In 1918, when Czechoslovakia was established, people started to use their real Slovak names and surnames.
              > Vrbica means in Slovak language place, where were many willows (vrba=willow). It was probably small place, because today it is a part of Liptovsky Mikulas.
              > About your Grandparents speaking Czech. During Czechoslovakia time (1918-1992)many people use to say: "you are Czech" because saying "Czechoslovak"was too long. Or some use to say: "you speak Czech", because they were lazy to say "Czech and Slovak". Some people (mostly foreigners) didn't know that in Czechoslovakia Czechs spoke in Czech and Slovaks spoke in Slovak. What do you think about this idea?
              > Zuzana (born in Czechoslovakia)
              >
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: John <johnqadam@...>
              > To: mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Saturday, March 9, 2013 7:38 PM
              > Subject: Re: [S-R] Belnay
              >
              >  
              >
              > That's exactly what it should say.
              >
              > --- In mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com, Lynne Wilson <sandalfoot0505@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Oh, my, I just made a discovery!
              > >
              > > I located the Belnay family Bible, with notes that my mother had made!
              > >
              > > She wrote that both Julius and John Belnay (my fathers older brothers) were
              > > born in Austria-Hungary.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Lynne Wilson
              Thank you, again. Much to learn! Lynne ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 30 , Mar 12, 2013
                Thank you, again. Much to learn! Lynne

                On Sun, Mar 10, 2013 at 7:58 PM, Ron <amiak27@...> wrote:

                > **
                >
                >
                > Lynne,
                >
                > Centering on your question of Slavish, I refer you to Prof. Votruba at
                > http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/qsonhist/slavicslovak.html
                >
                > which most all of us would agree is likely the most authoritative and
                > complete answer you will find.
                >
                > That is drilling down pretty deep into his great information, and
                > certainly reading through his web site, the questions and the answers, is a
                > great start to learning many, many things about our ancestors. Two more
                > general addresses to his site are:
                >
                > http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/qsonhist/qsonhist.html
                > for queries on History, and
                >
                > http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/ for his full web site.
                >
                > You can also go to our Yahoo Groups website for Slovak Roots and use the
                > search function to draw up past discussions on any key word, or do the same
                > at Slovak World.
                >
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/ and
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/
                >
                > Dr Votruba does not keep his writings static, but is adding and expanding
                > them as time goes. He also opened a discussion forum to compliment Slovak
                > World at
                > https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/slovak-spot
                >
                > Good reading! Our ancestors led interesting lives and our hunt is
                > fascinating with the variety of cultures, languages and varieties of place
                > names in each language. We have Slovak, Hungarian, Latin, German and
                > Rusyn.Cyrillic to deal with, and perhaps a few more - Polish in some
                > circumstances, Czech, and varieties of Cyrillic languages / dialects
                > depending upon time, politics and location. It is as much fun as if we came
                > from center of the Lord of the Ring series.
                >
                > Ron
                >
                > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Lynne Wilson <sandalfoot0505@...>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > Well, I certainly need to learn my history! I mean world history in
                > general.
                > >
                > > Thank you for this information.
                > >
                > > I am looking forward to digging deeper and coming up with my true
                > ancestry!
                > >
                > > Something rather odd, is that my father and several of my father's
                > friends
                > > often referred to themselves as "Slavish." Does this mean anything to
                > you?
                > > Have you ever heard "Slavish" before? Maybe anglicizing "Slovak". It
                > sounds
                > > to me that they were Slovak!
                > >
                > > I am thinking somewhere in their history in the USA somebody decided they
                > > were Czech, with the coming of Czechoslovakia after WW1 and that was
                > that.
                > > But I do need to do more research to get to the bottom of this!
                > >
                > > Thank you so much once again.
                > >
                > > Lynne
                > >
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Lynne Wilson
                Zuzana- You told me there is a listing for a Belnay is Bratislava, in the 1995 Slovak Census. Can you tell me how to access this record? Thank you. Lynne
                Message 7 of 30 , Mar 17, 2013
                  Zuzana- You told me there is a listing for a Belnay is Bratislava, in the 1995 Slovak Census. Can you tell me how to access this record? Thank you. Lynne

                  --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Zuzana Peer <zuzana177@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Lynn,
                  > there is Restaurant VRBICA in Liptovsky Mikulas, Verbeicz is not a Slovak word.
                  >  
                  > Your Grandfather's name was probably Peter BELNAJ. Belnay is probably Hungarian version of his Slovak surname Belaj, which sounds very Slovak.
                  >  
                  > Zuzana
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > From: MGMojher <mgmojher@...>
                  > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Friday, March 8, 2013 9:35 PM
                  > Subject: Re: [S-R] Belnay
                  >
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  > Lynne,
                  > As happens, the spelling of a village can be misspelled. There is no listings for a Vrbiczt or Vrbeicz. The Liptovska Mikulas clue does provide this:
                  > Vrbica: 1773 Verbicze, Werbica, 1786 Werbicze, 1808 Verbicz, Wrbica, 1863 Werbice, 1873â€"1913 Verbic, 1920â€"1923 Vrbica
                  >
                  > As you see Vrbica does not exist after 1923. That is because it was incorporated into:
                  > 1275 Liptovský Mikuláš LM/ZI liptov. po 1892 pričl. o. Mikulášsky Hušták, Vrbický Hušták; 1923 pričl. o. Vrbica;
                  >
                  > Restauracia/Restaurant Verbeicz had no listing that I could find. There was a Restauracia Vrbica.
                  >
                  > The 1995 Slovak Census had only one listing for Belnay, in Bratislava. The 2005 Liptovsky Mikulas telephone directory does not have a listing for Belnay. Other may comment better than I, but to me Belnay does not seem like a Slovak name. Since the surname seems to have died off in Slovakia, it may well be that you have an immigrant family to Slovakia. The Hungarian government encouraged migrants with skills to come to Hungary. For 900 years Hungary controlled what we now know as Slovakia.
                  >
                  > This is a link to the Roman Catholic records held by Liptovsky Mikulas. Happy searching.
                  > https://familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A%2F%2Ffamilysearch.org%2Frecords%2Fwaypoint%2FM99C-HFQ%3An967768381%3Fcc%3D1554443
                  >
                  > There is also Evangelical / Lutheran records for Liptovsky Mikulas
                  > https://familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A%2F%2Ffamilysearch.org%2Frecords%2Fwaypoint%2FM99C-7RV%3An1135362807%3Fcc%3D1554443
                  >
                  > From: Lynne Wilson
                  > Sent: Friday, March 08, 2013 6:27 PM
                  > To: mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [S-R] Belnay
                  >
                  > I only recently joined slovak roots, and am amazed at how much I have learned already about the procesvs. My paternal grandfather, Peter Belnay, was from Vrbiczt, Liptovska Mikulas. I have located "Restauracia" Vrbeicz on Google. Does anyone know if this is the same Vrbicz? Also, are there any Belnays here?
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • MGMojher
                  Lynne, Here is a link where you can do your search - http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/toolbox.htm On the “Toolbox” page in the upper right is a column
                  Message 8 of 30 , Mar 17, 2013
                    Lynne,
                    Here is a link where you can do your search - http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/toolbox.htm
                    On the “Toolbox” page in the upper right is a column labeled “Places.”
                    You will see the heading - Slovakia Surname & Settlement search (instructions), click on “(instructions)” to learn how to use the search engine, it is only in Slovak.
                    From the title you can see you can do a search by Surname and Settlement. A surname search will give you the number of that surname found / nachádzalo 28×, and the number of locations / v lokalitách the surname is found in. Below that will be a list of the “top 10” locations the surname is found in and the number found.
                    Conversely, the Settlement search means you type in a location. What will be of use is the list of names that the location was know by through out its history, so if you are searching records for a particular time period you know how it was spelled then. What follows is the “top 100” list of surnames for that location and the number that was found

                    From: Lynne Wilson
                    Sent: Sunday, March 17, 2013 4:49 PM
                    To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [S-R] Belnay


                    Zuzana- You told me there is a listing for a Belnay is Bratislava, in the 1995 Slovak Census. Can you tell me how to access this record? Thank you. Lynne

                    --- In mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com, Zuzana Peer <zuzana177@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Lynn,
                    > there is Restaurant VRBICA in Liptovsky Mikulas, Verbeicz is not a Slovak word.
                    > Â
                    > Your Grandfather's name was probably Peter BELNAJ. Belnay is probably Hungarian version of his Slovak surname Belaj, which sounds very Slovak.
                    > Â
                    > Zuzana
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: MGMojher <mgmojher@...>
                    > To: mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Friday, March 8, 2013 9:35 PM
                    > Subject: Re: [S-R] Belnay
                    >
                    >
                    > Â
                    >
                    > Lynne,
                    > As happens, the spelling of a village can be misspelled. There is no listings for a Vrbiczt or Vrbeicz. The Liptovska Mikulas clue does provide this:
                    > Vrbica: 1773 Verbicze, Werbica, 1786 Werbicze, 1808 Verbicz, Wrbica, 1863 Werbice, 1873â€"1913 Verbic, 1920â€"1923 Vrbica
                    >
                    > As you see Vrbica does not exist after 1923. That is because it was incorporated into:
                    > 1275 Liptovský Mikuláš LM/ZI liptov. po 1892 pričl. o. Mikulášsky Hušták, Vrbický Hušták; 1923 pričl. o. Vrbica;
                    >
                    > Restauracia/Restaurant Verbeicz had no listing that I could find. There was a Restauracia Vrbica.
                    >
                    > The 1995 Slovak Census had only one listing for Belnay, in Bratislava. The 2005 Liptovsky Mikulas telephone directory does not have a listing for Belnay. Other may comment better than I, but to me Belnay does not seem like a Slovak name. Since the surname seems to have died off in Slovakia, it may well be that you have an immigrant family to Slovakia. The Hungarian government encouraged migrants with skills to come to Hungary. For 900 years Hungary controlled what we now know as Slovakia.
                    >
                    > This is a link to the Roman Catholic records held by Liptovsky Mikulas. Happy searching.
                    > https://familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A%2F%2Ffamilysearch.org%2Frecords%2Fwaypoint%2FM99C-HFQ%3An967768381%3Fcc%3D1554443
                    >
                    > There is also Evangelical / Lutheran records for Liptovsky Mikulas
                    > https://familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A%2F%2Ffamilysearch.org%2Frecords%2Fwaypoint%2FM99C-7RV%3An1135362807%3Fcc%3D1554443
                    >
                    > From: Lynne Wilson
                    > Sent: Friday, March 08, 2013 6:27 PM
                    > To: mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: [S-R] Belnay
                    >
                    > I only recently joined slovak roots, and am amazed at how much I have learned already about the procesvs. My paternal grandfather, Peter Belnay, was from Vrbiczt, Liptovska Mikulas. I have located "Restauracia" Vrbeicz on Google. Does anyone know if this is the same Vrbicz? Also, are there any Belnays here?
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Lynne Wilson
                    Zuzana- Thank you so very much for this helpful information. I see a very busy day ahead tomorrow. By the way, I found numerous baptism records for Belnay
                    Message 9 of 30 , Mar 17, 2013
                      Zuzana- Thank you so very much for this helpful information. I see a very
                      busy day ahead tomorrow. By the way, I found numerous baptism records for
                      Belnay (Liptovsky Mikulas) on Family Search. So I have found past history
                      but no current living relatives to date. Thank you again, Lynne

                      On Sun, Mar 17, 2013 at 8:18 PM, MGMojher <mgmojher@...> wrote:

                      > **
                      >
                      >
                      > Lynne,
                      > Here is a link where you can do your search -
                      > http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/toolbox.htm
                      > On the �Toolbox� page in the upper right is a column labeled �Places.�
                      > You will see the heading - Slovakia Surname & Settlement search
                      > (instructions), click on �(instructions)� to learn how to use the search
                      > engine, it is only in Slovak.
                      > From the title you can see you can do a search by Surname and Settlement.
                      > A surname search will give you the number of that surname found /
                      > nach�dzalo 28�, and the number of locations / v lokalit�ch the surname is
                      > found in. Below that will be a list of the �top 10� locations the surname
                      > is found in and the number found.
                      > Conversely, the Settlement search means you type in a location. What will
                      > be of use is the list of names that the location was know by through out
                      > its history, so if you are searching records for a particular time period
                      > you know how it was spelled then. What follows is the �top 100� list of
                      > surnames for that location and the number that was found
                      >
                      > From: Lynne Wilson
                      > Sent: Sunday, March 17, 2013 4:49 PM
                      > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: Re: [S-R] Belnay
                      >
                      > Zuzana- You told me there is a listing for a Belnay is Bratislava, in the
                      > 1995 Slovak Census. Can you tell me how to access this record? Thank you.
                      > Lynne
                      >
                      > --- In mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com, Zuzana Peer <zuzana177@...>
                      > wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Lynn,
                      > > there is Restaurant VRBICA in Liptovsky Mikulas, Verbeicz is not a
                      > Slovak word.
                      > > �
                      > > Your Grandfather's name was probably Peter BELNAJ. Belnay is probably
                      > Hungarian version of his Slovak surname Belaj, which sounds very Slovak.
                      > > �
                      > > Zuzana
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ________________________________
                      > > From: MGMojher <mgmojher@...>
                      > > To: mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com
                      > > Sent: Friday, March 8, 2013 9:35 PM
                      > > Subject: Re: [S-R] Belnay
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > �
                      > >
                      > > Lynne,
                      > > As happens, the spelling of a village can be misspelled. There is no
                      > listings for a Vrbiczt or Vrbeicz. The Liptovska Mikulas clue does provide
                      > this:
                      > > Vrbica: 1773 Verbicze, Werbica, 1786 Werbicze, 1808 Verbicz, Wrbica,
                      > 1863 Werbice, 1873��"1913 Verbic, 1920��"1923 Vrbica
                      > >
                      > > As you see Vrbica does not exist after 1923. That is because it was
                      > incorporated into:
                      > > 1275 Liptovsk�� Mikul���� LM/ZI liptov. po 1892 pri� l. o. Mikul����sky
                      > Hu��t��k, Vrbick�� Hu��t��k; 1923 pri� l. o. Vrbica;
                      > >
                      > > Restauracia/Restaurant Verbeicz had no listing that I could find. There
                      > was a Restauracia Vrbica.
                      > >
                      > > The 1995 Slovak Census had only one listing for Belnay, in Bratislava.
                      > The 2005 Liptovsky Mikulas telephone directory does not have a listing for
                      > Belnay. Other may comment better than I, but to me Belnay does not seem
                      > like a Slovak name. Since the surname seems to have died off in Slovakia,
                      > it may well be that you have an immigrant family to Slovakia. The Hungarian
                      > government encouraged migrants with skills to come to Hungary. For 900
                      > years Hungary controlled what we now know as Slovakia.
                      > >
                      > > This is a link to the Roman Catholic records held by Liptovsky Mikulas.
                      > Happy searching.
                      > >
                      > https://familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A%2F%2Ffamilysearch.org%2Frecords%2Fwaypoint%2FM99C-HFQ%3An967768381%3Fcc%3D1554443
                      > >
                      > > There is also Evangelical / Lutheran records for Liptovsky Mikulas
                      > >
                      > https://familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A%2F%2Ffamilysearch.org%2Frecords%2Fwaypoint%2FM99C-7RV%3An1135362807%3Fcc%3D1554443
                      > >
                      > > From: Lynne Wilson
                      > > Sent: Friday, March 08, 2013 6:27 PM
                      > > To: mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com
                      > > Subject: [S-R] Belnay
                      > >
                      > > I only recently joined slovak roots, and am amazed at how much I have
                      > learned already about the procesvs. My paternal grandfather, Peter Belnay,
                      > was from Vrbiczt, Liptovska Mikulas. I have located "Restauracia" Vrbeicz
                      > on Google. Does anyone know if this is the same Vrbicz? Also, are there any
                      > Belnays here?
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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