Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...

Expand Messages
  • Miss Joanne E Fletcher
    Hi, Just wishing everyone a Merry Cristmas, Happy Hanuka and happy new year. Joanne E Fletcher ... This message was sent using IMP, the Internet Messaging
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 21, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi,

      Just wishing everyone a Merry Cristmas, Happy Hanuka and happy new year.

      Joanne E Fletcher

      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      This message was sent using IMP, the Internet Messaging Program.
    • Frank R Plichta
      Joanne, A few points to consider: 1. Hanukkah has nothing to do with Christmas the birth of our Savior Jesus Christ. 2. In 2013 it was celebrated from
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 21, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Joanne,



        A few points to consider:

        1. Hanukkah has nothing to do with Christmas the birth of our Savior Jesus
        Christ.

        2. In 2013 it was celebrated from November 27 to December 5. The dates are
        set by the Jewish Lunar Calendar and change every year.

        3. It is a celebration commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple in
        Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt on the 2nd century. A
        celebration of lights where oil for one day lasted 8 days.



        Enjoy the Holidays.

        Frank



        _____

        From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Miss Joanne E Fletcher
        Sent: Friday, December 21, 2012 11:44 PM
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...





        Hi,

        Just wishing everyone a Merry Cristmas, Happy Hanuka and happy new year.

        Joanne E Fletcher

        ----------------------------------------------------------
        This message was sent using IMP, the Internet Messaging Program.





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Frank R Plichta
        Sorry I jumped the gun. In 2012, Hanukkah was celebrated between December 8 to December 16. Since it was over for 2012 I was thinking in terms of 2013 in my
        Message 3 of 12 , Dec 21, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          Sorry I jumped the gun.



          In 2012, Hanukkah was celebrated between December 8 to December 16.

          Since it was over for 2012 I was thinking in terms of 2013 in my earlier
          answer.

          Frank



          _____

          From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of Frank R Plichta
          Sent: Saturday, December 22, 2012 12:41 AM
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...





          Joanne,

          A few points to consider:

          1. Hanukkah has nothing to do with Christmas the birth of our Savior Jesus
          Christ.

          2. In 2013 it was celebrated from November 27 to December 5. The dates are
          set by the Jewish Lunar Calendar and change every year.

          3. It is a celebration commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple in
          Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt on the 2nd century. A
          celebration of lights where oil for one day lasted 8 days.

          Enjoy the Holidays.

          Frank

          _____

          From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
          [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
          ] On
          Behalf Of Miss Joanne E Fletcher
          Sent: Friday, December 21, 2012 11:44 PM
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
          Subject: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...

          Hi,

          Just wishing everyone a Merry Cristmas, Happy Hanuka and happy new year.

          Joanne E Fletcher

          ----------------------------------------------------------
          This message was sent using IMP, the Internet Messaging Program.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • htcstech
          Did you know that the word Amen said at the end of Christian prayer, some identify with the Egyptian word Amun - a local deity of Thebes circa 2100BC? Just
          Message 4 of 12 , Dec 22, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            Did you know that the word 'Amen' said at the end of Christian prayer, some
            identify with the Egyptian word 'Amun' - a local deity of Thebes circa
            2100BC?

            Just sayin'

            Peter M.

            On 22 December 2012 16:55, Frank R Plichta <frank.r.plichta@...>wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > Sorry I jumped the gun.
            >
            > In 2012, Hanukkah was celebrated between December 8 to December 16.
            >
            > Since it was over for 2012 I was thinking in terms of 2013 in my earlier
            > answer.
            >
            >
            > Frank
            >
            > _____
            >
            > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com]
            > On
            > Behalf Of Frank R Plichta
            > Sent: Saturday, December 22, 2012 12:41 AM
            > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: RE: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...
            >
            >
            > Joanne,
            >
            > A few points to consider:
            >
            > 1. Hanukkah has nothing to do with Christmas the birth of our Savior Jesus
            > Christ.
            >
            > 2. In 2013 it was celebrated from November 27 to December 5. The dates are
            > set by the Jewish Lunar Calendar and change every year.
            >
            > 3. It is a celebration commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple in
            > Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt on the 2nd century. A
            > celebration of lights where oil for one day lasted 8 days.
            >
            > Enjoy the Holidays.
            >
            > Frank
            >
            > _____
            >
            > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
            > [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:
            > SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
            >
            > ] On
            > Behalf Of Miss Joanne E Fletcher
            > Sent: Friday, December 21, 2012 11:44 PM
            > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
            > Subject: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...
            >
            > Hi,
            >
            > Just wishing everyone a Merry Cristmas, Happy Hanuka and happy new year.
            >
            > Joanne E Fletcher
            >
            > ----------------------------------------------------------
            > This message was sent using IMP, the Internet Messaging Program.
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • lkocik@comcast.net
            Hi Frank  As for points;...  Jesus wasn t born on Dec 25th ... From: Frank R Plichta To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com Sent:
            Message 5 of 12 , Dec 22, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Frank

               As for points;...

               Jesus wasn't born on Dec 25th



              ----- Original Message -----


              From: "Frank R Plichta" <frank.r.plichta@...>
              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, December 21, 2012 10:40:48 PM
              Subject: RE: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...

              Joanne,

               

              A few points to consider:

              1.  Hanukkah has nothing to do with Christmas the birth of our Savior Jesus
              Christ.

              2.  In 2013 it was celebrated from November 27 to December 5.  The dates are
              set by the Jewish Lunar Calendar and change every year.

              3.  It is a celebration commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple in
              Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt on the 2nd century.  A
              celebration of lights where oil for one day lasted 8 days.

               

              Enjoy the Holidays.

              Frank

               

                _____  

              From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
              Behalf Of Miss Joanne E Fletcher
              Sent: Friday, December 21, 2012 11:44 PM
              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...

               

                

              Hi,

              Just wishing everyone a Merry Cristmas, Happy Hanuka and happy new year.

              Joanne E Fletcher

              ----------------------------------------------------------
              This message was sent using IMP, the Internet Messaging Program.





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Frank R Plichta
              I agree that Christ may not have been born on December 25th. The calendar we use today is significantly different that the calendar used 2,000+ years ago.
              Message 6 of 12 , Dec 22, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                I agree that Christ may not have been born on December 25th. The calendar
                we use today is significantly different that the calendar used 2,000+ years
                ago. The calendar has gone thru several revisions in addition to the
                changes from the Jewish Lunar Calendar, the Julian Calendar and the
                Gregorian Calendar.

                The date was not the question or issue.

                I was referring to the previous posting including Hanukkah and Christmas in
                the same statement. It appeared they were being used as related events.
                Their genealogy is so diverse that they are not even step-children. (Let's
                keep the discussion on genealogy.)

                Any other points to consider?

                Frank





                _____

                From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
                Behalf Of lkocik@...
                Sent: Saturday, December 22, 2012 4:19 AM
                To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...







                Hi Frank

                As for points;...

                Jesus wasn't born on Dec 25th

                ----- Original Message -----

                From: "Frank R Plichta" <frank.r.plichta@...
                <mailto:frank.r.plichta%40earthlink.net> >
                To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, December 21, 2012 10:40:48 PM
                Subject: RE: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...

                Joanne,



                A few points to consider:

                1. Hanukkah has nothing to do with Christmas the birth of our Savior Jesus
                Christ.

                2. In 2013 it was celebrated from November 27 to December 5. The dates are

                set by the Jewish Lunar Calendar and change every year.

                3. It is a celebration commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple in

                Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt on the 2nd century. A
                celebration of lights where oil for one day lasted 8 days.



                Enjoy the Holidays.

                Frank



                _____

                From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                ] On
                Behalf Of Miss Joanne E Fletcher
                Sent: Friday, December 21, 2012 11:44 PM
                To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                Subject: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...





                Hi,

                Just wishing everyone a Merry Cristmas, Happy Hanuka and happy new year.

                Joanne E Fletcher

                ----------------------------------------------------------
                This message was sent using IMP, the Internet Messaging Program.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Frank R Plichta
                Peter Etymology The usage of Amen, meaning so be it , as found in the early scriptures of the Bible is said to be of
                Message 7 of 12 , Dec 22, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  Peter


                  Etymology


                  The usage of Amen, meaning "so be it", as found in the early scriptures of the Bible <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bible> is said to be of Hebrew <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrew_language> origin; however, the basic triconsonantal root <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triconsonantal_root> from which the word was derived is common to a number of Semitic <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semitic_languages> Languages such as Aramaic <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aramaic> and Arabic <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic> . The word was imported into the Greek of the early Church from Judaism. From Greek, amen entered the other Western languages. According to a standard dictionary etymology, amen passed from Greek into Late <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_Latin> Latin, and thence into English.[8] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen#cite_note-AHD-8#cite_note-AHD-8> Rabbinic scholars from medieval France believed the standard Hebrew word for faith emuna comes from the root amen. Although in English transliteration they look different, they are both from the root alef-mem-nun.

                  That is, the Hebrew word amen derives from the same ancient triliteral <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triliteral> Hebrew root as does the verb ʾāmán.[9] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen#cite_note-9#cite_note-9> Grammarians frequently list ʾāmán under its three consonants (aleph <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleph> -mem <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mem> -nun <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nun_(letter)> ), which are identical to those of ʾāmēn (note that the Hebrew <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen##> letter א aleph <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleph> represents a glottal stop <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glottal_stop> sound, which functions as a consonant in the morphology of Hebrew). This triliteral <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triliteral> root means to be firm, confirmed, reliable, faithful, have faith, believe.

                  In Arabic <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_language> , the word is derived from its triliteral <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triliteral> common root word ʾĀmana (Arabic <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_language> : آمن‎), which has the same meanings as the Hebrew root word.

                  Popular among some theosophists <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theosophy> , proponents of Afrocentric <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afrocentric> theories of history <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen##> , and adherents of esoteric Christianity <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esoteric_Christianity> is the conjecture <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conjecture> that amen is a derivative of the name of the Egyptian god <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_god> Amun <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amun> (which is sometimes also spelled Amen). Some adherents of Eastern religions believe that amen shares roots with the Hindu Sanskrit <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanskrit> word, Aum <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aum> . There is no academic support for either of these views. The Hebrew word, as noted above, starts with aleph, while the Egyptian name begins with a yodh <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yodh> .

                  The Armenian <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_language> word ամեն <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English> / <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English#Key> ˌ <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English#Key> ɑː <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English#Key> m <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English#Key> ˈ <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English#Key> ɛ <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English#Key> n <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English> / means "every"; however it is also used in the same form at the conclusion of prayers, much as in English.[ <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen#cite_note-19#cite_note-19>

                  Frank



                  _____

                  From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of htcstech
                  Sent: Saturday, December 22, 2012 3:29 AM
                  To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...





                  Did you know that the word 'Amen' said at the end of Christian prayer, some
                  identify with the Egyptian word 'Amun' - a local deity of Thebes circa
                  2100BC?

                  Just sayin'

                  Peter M.

                  On 22 December 2012 16:55, Frank R Plichta <frank.r.plichta@... <mailto:frank.r.plichta%40earthlink.net> >wrote:

                  > **
                  >
                  >
                  > Sorry I jumped the gun.
                  >
                  > In 2012, Hanukkah was celebrated between December 8 to December 16.
                  >
                  > Since it was over for 2012 I was thinking in terms of 2013 in my earlier
                  > answer.
                  >
                  >
                  > Frank
                  >
                  > _____
                  >
                  > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> ]
                  > On
                  > Behalf Of Frank R Plichta
                  > Sent: Saturday, December 22, 2012 12:41 AM
                  > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > Subject: RE: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...
                  >
                  >
                  > Joanne,
                  >
                  > A few points to consider:
                  >
                  > 1. Hanukkah has nothing to do with Christmas the birth of our Savior Jesus
                  > Christ.
                  >
                  > 2. In 2013 it was celebrated from November 27 to December 5. The dates are
                  > set by the Jewish Lunar Calendar and change every year.
                  >
                  > 3. It is a celebration commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple in
                  > Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt on the 2nd century. A
                  > celebration of lights where oil for one day lasted 8 days.
                  >
                  > Enjoy the Holidays.
                  >
                  > Frank
                  >
                  > _____
                  >
                  > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:
                  > SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                  >
                  > ] On
                  > Behalf Of Miss Joanne E Fletcher
                  > Sent: Friday, December 21, 2012 11:44 PM
                  > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > Subject: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...
                  >
                  > Hi,
                  >
                  > Just wishing everyone a Merry Cristmas, Happy Hanuka and happy new year.
                  >
                  > Joanne E Fletcher
                  >
                  > ----------------------------------------------------------
                  > This message was sent using IMP, the Internet Messaging Program.
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • htcstech
                  Hello Frank, Thanks for the very thorough etymology. I did qualify my assertion that some say as I knew there was a bit of debate about this. If we tear
                  Message 8 of 12 , Dec 22, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hello Frank,

                    Thanks for the very thorough etymology. I did qualify my assertion that
                    'some say' as I knew there was a bit of debate about this.
                    If we tear apart religions, then the role of Zoroasta should not be
                    forgotten. Light and Dark, the heirarchy of Angels and other very Christian
                    beliefs all originate from him. This was the religion of the Persians
                    before Muhammed.

                    Merry Christmas to All.

                    Peter M. (leaning slightly to the esoteric).

                    On 23 December 2012 01:36, Frank R Plichta <frank.r.plichta@...>wrote:

                    > **
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Peter
                    >
                    > Etymology
                    >
                    > The usage of Amen, meaning "so be it", as found in the early scriptures of
                    > the Bible <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bible> is said to be of Hebrew <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrew_language> origin; however, the basic
                    > triconsonantal root <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triconsonantal_root>
                    > from which the word was derived is common to a number of Semitic <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semitic_languages> Languages such as Aramaic
                    > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aramaic> and Arabic <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic> . The word was imported into the
                    > Greek of the early Church from Judaism. From Greek, amen entered the other
                    > Western languages. According to a standard dictionary etymology, amen
                    > passed from Greek into Late <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_Latin>
                    > Latin, and thence into English.[8] <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen#cite_note-AHD-8#cite_note-AHD-8>
                    > Rabbinic scholars from medieval France believed the standard Hebrew word
                    > for faith emuna comes from the root amen. Although in English
                    > transliteration they look different, they are both from the root
                    > alef-mem-nun.
                    >
                    > That is, the Hebrew word amen derives from the same ancient triliteral <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triliteral> Hebrew root as does the verb
                    > ʾāmán.[9] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen#cite_note-9#cite_note-9>
                    > Grammarians frequently list ʾāmán under its three consonants (aleph <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleph> -mem <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mem>
                    > -nun <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nun_(letter)> ), which are identical
                    > to those of ʾāmēn (note that the Hebrew <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen##> letter א aleph <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleph> represents a glottal stop <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glottal_stop> sound, which functions as a
                    > consonant in the morphology of Hebrew). This triliteral <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triliteral> root means to be firm,
                    > confirmed, reliable, faithful, have faith, believe.
                    >
                    > In Arabic <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_language> , the word is
                    > derived from its triliteral <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triliteral>
                    > common root word ʾĀmana (Arabic <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_language> : آمن‎), which has the same
                    > meanings as the Hebrew root word.
                    >
                    > Popular among some theosophists <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theosophy>
                    > , proponents of Afrocentric <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afrocentric>
                    > theories of history <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen##> , and adherents
                    > of esoteric Christianity <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esoteric_Christianity> is the conjecture <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conjecture> that amen is a derivative of the
                    > name of the Egyptian god <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_god> Amun
                    > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amun> (which is sometimes also spelled
                    > Amen). Some adherents of Eastern religions believe that amen shares roots
                    > with the Hindu Sanskrit <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanskrit> word, Aum
                    > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aum> . There is no academic support for
                    > either of these views. The Hebrew word, as noted above, starts with aleph,
                    > while the Egyptian name begins with a yodh <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yodh> .
                    >
                    > The Armenian <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_language> word ամեն <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English> / <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English#Key> ˌ <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English#Key> ɑː <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English#Key> m <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English#Key> ˈ <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English#Key> ɛ <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English#Key> n <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_English> / means "every";
                    > however it is also used in the same form at the conclusion of prayers, much
                    > as in English.[ <
                    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen#cite_note-19#cite_note-19>
                    >
                    > Frank
                    >
                    > _____
                    >
                    > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com]
                    > On Behalf Of htcstech
                    > Sent: Saturday, December 22, 2012 3:29 AM
                    > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Re: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...
                    >
                    > Did you know that the word 'Amen' said at the end of Christian prayer, some
                    > identify with the Egyptian word 'Amun' - a local deity of Thebes circa
                    > 2100BC?
                    >
                    > Just sayin'
                    >
                    > Peter M.
                    >
                    > On 22 December 2012 16:55, Frank R Plichta <frank.r.plichta@...<mailto:
                    > frank.r.plichta%40earthlink.net> >wrote:
                    >
                    > > **
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Sorry I jumped the gun.
                    > >
                    > > In 2012, Hanukkah was celebrated between December 8 to December 16.
                    > >
                    > > Since it was over for 2012 I was thinking in terms of 2013 in my earlier
                    > > answer.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Frank
                    > >
                    > > _____
                    > >
                    > > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:
                    > SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com<mailto:
                    > SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> ]
                    > > On
                    > > Behalf Of Frank R Plichta
                    > > Sent: Saturday, December 22, 2012 12:41 AM
                    > > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                    >
                    > > Subject: RE: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Joanne,
                    > >
                    > > A few points to consider:
                    > >
                    > > 1. Hanukkah has nothing to do with Christmas the birth of our Savior
                    > Jesus
                    > > Christ.
                    > >
                    > > 2. In 2013 it was celebrated from November 27 to December 5. The dates
                    > are
                    > > set by the Jewish Lunar Calendar and change every year.
                    > >
                    > > 3. It is a celebration commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple
                    > in
                    > > Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt on the 2nd century. A
                    > > celebration of lights where oil for one day lasted 8 days.
                    > >
                    > > Enjoy the Holidays.
                    > >
                    > > Frank
                    > >
                    > > _____
                    > >
                    > > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:
                    > SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                    > > [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:
                    > SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:
                    > > SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                    > >
                    > > ] On
                    > > Behalf Of Miss Joanne E Fletcher
                    > > Sent: Friday, December 21, 2012 11:44 PM
                    > > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                    > <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                    > > Subject: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...
                    > >
                    > > Hi,
                    > >
                    > > Just wishing everyone a Merry Cristmas, Happy Hanuka and happy new year.
                    > >
                    > > Joanne E Fletcher
                    > >
                    > > ----------------------------------------------------------
                    > > This message was sent using IMP, the Internet Messaging Program.
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Ben Sorensen
                    No, Frank, they were not used that way at all.  Your fervency and vehemence for keeping Hanukkah and Christmas separate, and I suppose in two sentences is the
                    Message 9 of 12 , Dec 22, 2012
                    • 0 Attachment
                      No, Frank, they were not used that way at all.  Your fervency and vehemence for keeping Hanukkah and Christmas separate, and I suppose in two sentences is the only "issue" that arose from her post.

                      The biggest point, though, to consider is that this is a forum for genealogy, not religious zeal.
                      Ben


                      ________________________________
                      From: Frank R Plichta <frank.r.plichta@...>
                      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Saturday, December 22, 2012 9:30 AM
                      Subject: Not related RE: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...


                       
                      I agree that Christ may not have been born on December 25th. The calendar
                      we use today is significantly different that the calendar used 2,000+ years
                      ago. The calendar has gone thru several revisions in addition to the
                      changes from the Jewish Lunar Calendar, the Julian Calendar and the
                      Gregorian Calendar.

                      The date was not the question or issue.

                      I was referring to the previous posting including Hanukkah and Christmas in
                      the same statement. It appeared they were being used as related events.
                      Their genealogy is so diverse that they are not even step-children. (Let's
                      keep the discussion on genealogy.)

                      Any other points to consider?

                      Frank

                      _____

                      From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
                      Behalf Of lkocik@...
                      Sent: Saturday, December 22, 2012 4:19 AM
                      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...

                      Hi Frank

                      As for points;...

                      Jesus wasn't born on Dec 25th

                      ----- Original Message -----

                      From: "Frank R Plichta" <frank.r.plichta@...
                      <mailto:frank.r.plichta%40earthlink.net> >
                      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Friday, December 21, 2012 10:40:48 PM
                      Subject: RE: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...

                      Joanne,

                      A few points to consider:

                      1. Hanukkah has nothing to do with Christmas the birth of our Savior Jesus
                      Christ.

                      2. In 2013 it was celebrated from November 27 to December 5. The dates are

                      set by the Jewish Lunar Calendar and change every year.

                      3. It is a celebration commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple in

                      Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt on the 2nd century. A
                      celebration of lights where oil for one day lasted 8 days.

                      Enjoy the Holidays.

                      Frank

                      _____

                      From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                      [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                      ] On
                      Behalf Of Miss Joanne E Fletcher
                      Sent: Friday, December 21, 2012 11:44 PM
                      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
                      Subject: [S-R] Merry Christmas and Happy New Year...

                      Hi,

                      Just wishing everyone a Merry Cristmas, Happy Hanuka and happy new year.

                      Joanne E Fletcher

                      ----------------------------------------------------------
                      This message was sent using IMP, the Internet Messaging Program.

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Ben Yahoo
                      Happy holidays to you as well! Ben Sent from my iPhone ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      Message 10 of 12 , Dec 22, 2012
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Happy holidays to you as well!
                        Ben

                        Sent from my iPhone

                        On Dec 21, 2012, at 11:43 PM, "Miss Joanne E Fletcher" <joannef@...> wrote:

                        > Hi,
                        >
                        > Just wishing everyone a Merry Cristmas, Happy Hanuka and happy new year.
                        >
                        > Joanne E Fletcher
                        >
                        > ----------------------------------------------------------
                        > This message was sent using IMP, the Internet Messaging Program.
                        >
                        >


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Julie Michutka
                        ... One could argue the same about New Year, which also was in the same statement. But that doesn t seem to be a problem? Thank you for your kind wishes to the
                        Message 11 of 12 , Dec 25, 2012
                        • 0 Attachment
                          On Dec 22, 2012, at 9:30 AM, Frank R Plichta wrote:
                          > I was referring to the previous posting including Hanukkah and Christmas in
                          > the same statement. It appeared they were being used as related events.
                          > Their genealogy is so diverse that they are not even step-children.

                          One could argue the same about New Year, which also was in the same statement. But that doesn't seem to be a problem?

                          Thank you for your kind wishes to the group, Joanne, and blessings of the season to all.

                          ~ Julie Michutka

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Julie Michutka
                          My apologies to all for posting on a thread that ended a few days ago; for some reason I did not notice the dates, or that there have been a slew of messages
                          Message 12 of 12 , Dec 25, 2012
                          • 0 Attachment
                            My apologies to all for posting on a thread that ended a few days ago; for some reason I did not notice the dates, or that there have been a slew of messages on other topics since then. Did not mean to resurrect something that had been laid to rest.

                            ~ Julie Michutka
                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.