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Re: translating names from latin to Slovak

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  • Carl
    Here is a link to a site that shows given names in different languages. Many of the ones you asked about are there. For example the English Christine is
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 13, 2012
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      Here is a link to a site that shows given names in different languages. Many of the ones you asked about are there. For example the English Christine is Kristina in Slovak.
      CK

      http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~scoconee/names.html

      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, lkocik@... wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > hello
      >
      >  I have some given names from church records [latin] and their A nglo versions,  that I 'm trying to convert to Slovak    I realize there are web sites that do this, but I've found conflicting data.
      >
      >  I usually use a name as it appears in the record I'm tran scibing, but I'd like to footnote the Slovak version of the name.
      >
      >  Anywho, if anyone can tell me the Slovak versions of these names I would be grateful;
      >
      > Peter...Joanna [fem]...Ferdinand...Vincent...Mathias...Maria...Anna...Emeric...Anthony...V endelin...Christina...Frances[fem]...Albert...L ester...Gregory...William.
      >
      >
      >
      >  Also; about two surnames.....could anyone tell me which is more proper for Slovak...Jurena or Jurenya.
      >
      >  The other name is Vanek or Vanyek.
      >
      >  I understand the Magyar addition of "z" and "s" but is the addition of "y" legitimate Slovak?
      >
      >
      >
      >  Lastly while on this subject; is anyone familiar with "t" being sustituted for "c" in early 1800's church records.
      >
      >    I've seen multiple instances of  Kot zak for Koczak and Kotzich for Koczich in Gbely [Zahorie region]. it almost looks as if the name was written at first with the original  "c" and then someone put a line through the top of the "c"  [like a European 7] making in into a "t". In some cases it is a very distinct "t".  The strange thing is I've only seen this with the Koczak and Koczich names.
      >
      >  Could this have something to do with the magyar pronounciation of the hard "c' like "ts"?
      >
      >  
      >
      >  I know this subject may be more suited for Slovak-World but I don't feel comfortable at that site anymore.
      >
      > Thank you
      >
      > Larry Kocik
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • William C. Wormuth
      I have responded directly because I had a chart prepared by Martin Votruba which is jpg. Z Bohom, Vilo ________________________________ From: Carl
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 13, 2012
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        I have responded directly because I had a chart prepared by Martin Votruba which is jpg.

        Z Bohom,

        Vilo




        ________________________________
        From: Carl <carl.kotlarchik@...>
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2012 11:56 AM
        Subject: [S-R] Re: translating names from latin to Slovak


         
        Here is a link to a site that shows given names in different languages. Many of the ones you asked about are there. For example the English Christine is Kristina in Slovak.
        CK

        http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~scoconee/names.html

        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, lkocik@... wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > hello
        >
        >  I have some given names from church records [latin] and their A nglo versions,  that I 'm trying to convert to Slovak    I realize there are web sites that do this, but I've found conflicting data.
        >
        >  I usually use a name as it appears in the record I'm tran scibing, but I'd like to footnote the Slovak version of the name.
        >
        >  Anywho, if anyone can tell me the Slovak versions of these names I would be grateful;
        >
        > Peter...Joanna [fem]...Ferdinand...Vincent...Mathias...Maria...Anna...Emeric...Anthony...V endelin...Christina...Frances[fem]...Albert...L ester...Gregory...William.
        >
        >
        >
        >  Also; about two surnames.....could anyone tell me which is more proper for Slovak...Jurena or Jurenya.
        >
        >  The other name is Vanek or Vanyek.
        >
        >  I understand the Magyar addition of "z" and "s" but is the addition of "y" legitimate Slovak?
        >
        >
        >
        >  Lastly while on this subject; is anyone familiar with "t" being sustituted for "c" in early 1800's church records.
        >
        >    I've seen multiple instances of  Kot zak for Koczak and Kotzich for Koczich in Gbely [Zahorie region]. it almost looks as if the name was written at first with the original  "c" and then someone put a line through the top of the "c"  [like a European 7] making in into a "t". In some cases it is a very distinct "t".  The strange thing is I've only seen this with the Koczak and Koczich names.
        >
        >  Could this have something to do with the magyar pronounciation of the hard "c' like "ts"?
        >
        >  
        >
        >  I know this subject may be more suited for Slovak-World but I don't feel comfortable at that site anymore.
        >
        > Thank you
        >
        > Larry Kocik
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • lkocik@comcast.net
        Thank you Carl.  Ironically your name wasn t on my list, but it s  one I ve wondered about.  Is the Slovak version Karol? Also is there a connection to the
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 13, 2012
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          Thank you Carl.

           Ironically your name wasn't on my list, but it's  one I've wondered about.

           Is the Slovak version Karol? Also is there a connection to the name Charles?I knew a Charles Kratky. When I found his naturalization papers he claimed his name to be Karol. I do know that some immigrants were confused on Anglo translations of their Slavic names.

             I 've seen "Carol" in the latin church records
          but not in my bloodline, so I've never had to deal with the translation. The name is in my extended tree, so I will one day be dealing with translating it.

           Thank you

          Larry


          ----- Original Message -----


          From: "Carl" <carl.kotlarchik@...>
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2012 9:56:05 AM
          Subject: [S-R] Re: translating names from latin to Slovak

          Here is a link to a site that shows given names in different languages.  Many of the ones you asked about are there.  For example the English Christine is Kristina in Slovak.
          CK

          http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~scoconee/names.html

          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, lkocik@... wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > hello
          >
          >  I have some given names from church records [latin] and their A nglo versions,  that I 'm trying to convert to Slovak    I realize there are web sites that do this, but I've found conflicting data.
          >
          >  I usually use a name as it appears in the record I'm tran scibing, but I'd like to footnote the Slovak version of the name.
          >
          >  Anywho, if anyone can tell me the Slovak versions of these names I would be grateful;
          >
          > Peter...Joanna [fem]...Ferdinand...Vincent...Mathias...Maria...Anna...Emeric...Anthony...V endelin...Christina...Frances[fem]...Albert...L ester...Gregory...William.
          >
          >
          >
          >  Also; about two surnames.....could anyone tell me which is more proper for Slovak...Jurena or Jurenya.
          >
          >  The other name is Vanek or Vanyek.
          >
          >  I understand the Magyar addition of "z" and "s" but is the addition of "y" legitimate Slovak?
          >
          >
          >
          >  Lastly while on this subject; is anyone familiar with "t" being sustituted for "c" in early 1800's church records.
          >
          >    I've seen multiple instances of  Kot zak for Koczak and Kotzich for Koczich in Gbely [Zahorie region]. it almost looks as if the name was written at first with the original  "c" and then someone put a line through the top of the "c"  [like a European 7] making in into a "t". In some cases it is a very distinct "t".  The strange thing is I've only seen this with the Koczak and Koczich names.
          >
          >  Could this have something to do with the magyar pronounciation of the hard "c' like "ts"?
          >
          >  
          >
          >  I know this subject may be more suited for Slovak-World but I don't feel comfortable at that site anymore.
          >
          > Thank you
          >
          > Larry Kocik
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Carl
          Yes, Carl or Karl is the German version of Charles. The Slovak version is usually written as Karol.
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 14, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            Yes, Carl or Karl is the German version of Charles. The Slovak version is usually written as Karol.

            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, lkocik@... wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > Thank you Carl.
            >
            >  Ironically your name wasn't on my list, but it's  one I've wondered about.
            >
            >  Is the Slovak version Karol? Also is there a connection to the name Charles?I knew a Charles Kratky. When I found his naturalization papers he claimed his name to be Karol. I do know that some immigrants were confused on Anglo translations of their Slavic names.
            >
            >    I 've seen "Carol" in the latin church records
            > but not in my bloodline, so I've never had to deal with the translation. The name is in my extended tree, so I will one day be dealing with translating it.
            >
            >  Thank you
            >
            > Larry
            >
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            >
            >
            > From: "Carl" <carl.kotlarchik@...>
            > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2012 9:56:05 AM
            > Subject: [S-R] Re: translating names from latin to Slovak
            >
            > Here is a link to a site that shows given names in different languages.  Many of the ones you asked about are there.  For example the English Christine is Kristina in Slovak.
            > CK
            >
            > http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~scoconee/names.html
            >
            > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, lkocik@ wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > hello
            > >
            > >  I have some given names from church records [latin] and their A nglo versions,  that I 'm trying to convert to Slovak    I realize there are web sites that do this, but I've found conflicting data.
            > >
            > >  I usually use a name as it appears in the record I'm tran scibing, but I'd like to footnote the Slovak version of the name.
            > >
            > >  Anywho, if anyone can tell me the Slovak versions of these names I would be grateful;
            > >
            > > Peter...Joanna [fem]...Ferdinand...Vincent...Mathias...Maria...Anna...Emeric...Anthony...V endelin...Christina...Frances[fem]...Albert...L ester...Gregory...William.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >  Also; about two surnames.....could anyone tell me which is more proper for Slovak...Jurena or Jurenya.
            > >
            > >  The other name is Vanek or Vanyek.
            > >
            > >  I understand the Magyar addition of "z" and "s" but is the addition of "y" legitimate Slovak?
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >  Lastly while on this subject; is anyone familiar with "t" being sustituted for "c" in early 1800's church records.
            > >
            > >    I've seen multiple instances of  Kot zak for Koczak and Kotzich for Koczich in Gbely [Zahorie region]. it almost looks as if the name was written at first with the original  "c" and then someone put a line through the top of the "c"  [like a European 7] making in into a "t". In some cases it is a very distinct "t".  The strange thing is I've only seen this with the Koczak and Koczich names.
            > >
            > >  Could this have something to do with the magyar pronounciation of the hard "c' like "ts"?
            > >
            > >  
            > >
            > >  I know this subject may be more suited for Slovak-World but I don't feel comfortable at that site anymore.
            > >
            > > Thank you
            > >
            > > Larry Kocik
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
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