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areas of Greek Catholic vs. Roman Catholic?

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  • Judy
    Is there a geographical pattern to the concentration of Greek Catholic vs. Roman Catholic in the area that would have been Austria in the 1890s? I know
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 26, 2012
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      Is there a geographical pattern to the concentration of Greek Catholic vs. Roman Catholic in the area that would have been Austria in the 1890s?

      I know everthing depends upon identifying the village, but so far very little documentation has been found on this person and not for the lack of searching. I am trying to get a better idea of where he might have come from. One record indicates that he was Greek Catholic and immigrated from Austria around 1892.
    • htcstech
      Hello Judy, Austria would have very little Greek Catholic parishes (if any) as it was a Roman Catholic and Lutheran country, however the Greek, the Orthodox
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 26, 2012
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        Hello Judy,

        Austria would have very little Greek Catholic parishes (if any) as it was a
        Roman Catholic and Lutheran country, however the Greek, the Orthodox
        Russian as well as the Eastern Catholic churches are closely related, so it
        is possible for the northern region of Austria where there would be Polish
        and Czech (Bohemian) immigrants. Even so, both of these countries were
        mainly Roman Catholic. There is also a likelyhood that your person
        resettled in Austria from elsewhere, keeping the faith.
        Some immigrants at the time stated they were from Austria rather than
        Austro-Hungary or Hungary, so there is a possibility that your person
        actually came from the eastern part of northern old Hungary where there is
        a large area of Eastern (Greek) Catholics.

        Can you post the name and whatever details you have? That may help us a bit
        more.

        Peter M.

        On 27 October 2012 06:59, Judy <hogelj@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > Is there a geographical pattern to the concentration of Greek Catholic vs.
        > Roman Catholic in the area that would have been Austria in the 1890s?
        >
        > I know everthing depends upon identifying the village, but so far very
        > little documentation has been found on this person and not for the lack of
        > searching. I am trying to get a better idea of where he might have come
        > from. One record indicates that he was Greek Catholic and immigrated from
        > Austria around 1892.
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Judy
        Thanks Peter for your reply. Very little is known, so I m really fishing for some direction. Hence my question of location for GK and the MIKLISH surname in
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 26, 2012
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          Thanks Peter for your reply. Very little is known, so I'm really fishing for some direction. Hence my question of location for GK and the MIKLISH surname in my 2 questions today. I thought GK would have been in the area further east, but wasn't sure. I understand the confusion the listings of Austria/Hungary/Austria-Hungary homelands when trying to find place of orgin, so I know it really could be anywhere in Austria-Hungary.

          Known:
          Nicholas MIKLISH
          born: Dec 19, 1861 in Austria
          died: March 29, 1940, Salem Township, Westmoreland, PA
          family stories say he immigrated in: 1892
          religion: Greek Catholic
          occupation in US: miner
          family identifies themselves as Slovak


          Please see the messages that John and I have exchanged on SR Oct 26 re MIKLISH for further information.

          Judy

          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, htcstech <htcstech@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello Judy,
          >
          > Austria would have very little Greek Catholic parishes (if any) as it was a
          > Roman Catholic and Lutheran country, however the Greek, the Orthodox
          > Russian as well as the Eastern Catholic churches are closely related, so it
          > is possible for the northern region of Austria where there would be Polish
          > and Czech (Bohemian) immigrants. Even so, both of these countries were
          > mainly Roman Catholic. There is also a likelyhood that your person
          > resettled in Austria from elsewhere, keeping the faith.
          > Some immigrants at the time stated they were from Austria rather than
          > Austro-Hungary or Hungary, so there is a possibility that your person
          > actually came from the eastern part of northern old Hungary where there is
          > a large area of Eastern (Greek) Catholics.
          >
          > Can you post the name and whatever details you have? That may help us a bit
          > more.
          >
          > Peter M.
          >
          > On 27 October 2012 06:59, Judy <hogelj@...> wrote:
          >
          > > **
          > >
          > >
          > > Is there a geographical pattern to the concentration of Greek Catholic vs.
          > > Roman Catholic in the area that would have been Austria in the 1890s?
          > >
          > > I know everthing depends upon identifying the village, but so far very
          > > little documentation has been found on this person and not for the lack of
          > > searching. I am trying to get a better idea of where he might have come
          > > from. One record indicates that he was Greek Catholic and immigrated from
          > > Austria around 1892.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • lacoros@gmail.com
          Hello Peter, Do not forget, that Galizia - todays south Poland and western part of Ukraina - was a part of Austria and not of Hungary. Including Lemberg
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 26, 2012
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            Hello Peter,

            Do not forget, that Galizia - todays south Poland and western part of Ukraina - was a part of Austria and not of Hungary. Including Lemberg (todays Lvov or Lviv in Ukraina). And there are a lot of Greek-catholics there.

            Ladislav
            -----Original Message-----
            From: htcstech <htcstech@...>
            Sender: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Sat, 27 Oct 2012 13:54:11
            To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
            Reply-To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [S-R] areas of Greek Catholic vs. Roman Catholic?

            Hello Judy,

            Austria would have very little Greek Catholic parishes (if any) as it was a
            Roman Catholic and Lutheran country, however the Greek, the Orthodox
            Russian as well as the Eastern Catholic churches are closely related, so it
            is possible for the northern region of Austria where there would be Polish
            and Czech (Bohemian) immigrants. Even so, both of these countries were
            mainly Roman Catholic. There is also a likelyhood that your person
            resettled in Austria from elsewhere, keeping the faith.
            Some immigrants at the time stated they were from Austria rather than
            Austro-Hungary or Hungary, so there is a possibility that your person
            actually came from the eastern part of northern old Hungary where there is
            a large area of Eastern (Greek) Catholics.

            Can you post the name and whatever details you have? That may help us a bit
            more.

            Peter M.

            On 27 October 2012 06:59, Judy <hogelj@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > Is there a geographical pattern to the concentration of Greek Catholic vs.
            > Roman Catholic in the area that would have been Austria in the 1890s?
            >
            > I know everthing depends upon identifying the village, but so far very
            > little documentation has been found on this person and not for the lack of
            > searching. I am trying to get a better idea of where he might have come
            > from. One record indicates that he was Greek Catholic and immigrated from
            > Austria around 1892.
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • htcstech
            Yes. You are right. I was thinking of modern borders. Peter M. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 27, 2012
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              Yes. You are right. I was thinking of modern borders.

              Peter M.

              On 27 October 2012 16:51, <lacoros@...> wrote:

              > **
              >
              >
              > Hello Peter,
              >
              > Do not forget, that Galizia - todays south Poland and western part of
              > Ukraina - was a part of Austria and not of Hungary. Including Lemberg
              > (todays Lvov or Lviv in Ukraina). And there are a lot of Greek-catholics
              > there.
              >
              > Ladislav
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: htcstech <htcstech@...>
              > Sender: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Sat, 27 Oct 2012 13:54:11
              > To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
              > Reply-To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: Re: [S-R] areas of Greek Catholic vs. Roman Catholic?
              >
              > Hello Judy,
              >
              > Austria would have very little Greek Catholic parishes (if any) as it was
              > a
              > Roman Catholic and Lutheran country, however the Greek, the Orthodox
              > Russian as well as the Eastern Catholic churches are closely related, so
              > it
              > is possible for the northern region of Austria where there would be Polish
              > and Czech (Bohemian) immigrants. Even so, both of these countries were
              > mainly Roman Catholic. There is also a likelyhood that your person
              > resettled in Austria from elsewhere, keeping the faith.
              > Some immigrants at the time stated they were from Austria rather than
              > Austro-Hungary or Hungary, so there is a possibility that your person
              > actually came from the eastern part of northern old Hungary where there is
              > a large area of Eastern (Greek) Catholics.
              >
              > Can you post the name and whatever details you have? That may help us a
              > bit
              > more.
              >
              > Peter M.
              >
              > On 27 October 2012 06:59, Judy <hogelj@...> wrote:
              >
              > > **
              > >
              > >
              > > Is there a geographical pattern to the concentration of Greek Catholic
              > vs.
              > > Roman Catholic in the area that would have been Austria in the 1890s?
              > >
              > > I know everthing depends upon identifying the village, but so far very
              > > little documentation has been found on this person and not for the lack
              > of
              > > searching. I am trying to get a better idea of where he might have come
              > > from. One record indicates that he was Greek Catholic and immigrated
              > from
              > > Austria around 1892.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Tom Potsko
              Has anyone heard of a village called HlineSol? Tom ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 30, 2012
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                Has anyone heard of a village called HlineSol? Tom

                On Fri, Oct 26, 2012 at 3:59 PM, Judy <hogelj@...> wrote:

                > Is there a geographical pattern to the concentration of Greek Catholic vs.
                > Roman Catholic in the area that would have been Austria in the 1890s?
                >
                > I know everthing depends upon identifying the village, but so far very
                > little documentation has been found on this person and not for the lack of
                > searching. I am trying to get a better idea of where he might have come
                > from. One record indicates that he was Greek Catholic and immigrated from
                > Austria around 1892.
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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