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LUBINA: immigration to US

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  • Laura
    (My first post; rules said to type towns in caps?) I recently started trying to piece my family tree together from a pile of scrapnotes I d collected from
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 23, 2012
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      (My first post; rules said to type towns in caps?)

      I recently started trying to piece my family tree together from a pile of scrapnotes I'd collected from conversations with my grandparents over the years. Ancestry.com sure helps!

      Anyway, my grandparents came from a small village called Lubina, near Nove Mesto nad Vahom in NW Slovakia. From my research, it seems like a large percentage of that little village came over to the US in the early 1900s, *many* to St. Louis (a few to Chicago; and they also went back and forth between these two Slovak communities once in the US).

      I searched this site but didn't come across any threads on Lubina so I'll just ask now.....anyone here trace back to that region? Myjava, Lubina, several little towns around there that intermarried and immigrated to St. Louis. My relatives and their townfolk were mostly Lutheran, as far as I can tell. (Maybe the Catholics from that town went elsewhere? I don't know). I'm very interested in understanding the history of their emigration.

      Also, I know very little about the Slovak community in Chicago, but there definitely was an area centering around Dvorak Park. Anyone from there/know anything about the Slovak community in the early 1900-1940?

      Thanks!
      Laura
    • John
      ... Lubina Evangelical records are online for research from 1783.
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 23, 2012
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        >>> my grandparents came from a small village called Lubina, near Nove Mesto nad Vahom in NW Slovakia. <<<

        Lubina Evangelical records are online for research from 1783.
      • Laura
        ... Lubina Evangelical records are online for research from 1783. Thanks. I did find them at familysearch.org. It was a breathtakingly emotional experience,
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 23, 2012
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          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "John" <johnqadam@...> wrote:
          Lubina Evangelical records are online for research from 1783.

          Thanks. I did find them at familysearch.org. It was a breathtakingly emotional experience, as I'm sure you know, to come across baptismal records of ancestors from over 100 years ago. I've been able to put my tree together back into the mid/late 1800s using that site, combined with Ellis Island, tracking them to St. Louis (and Chicago). I'm interested in meeting others who are descendants from Lubina (although it was a small village, they came over to the US in large groups and effective chain migration, so I know they are here somewhere!), as well as learn more about the historical color of those (St. Louis and Chicago) early communities. I've been reading historical books that I can dig up, but the ones I've found focus mostly on Pittsburgh. Fascinating background, for sure, though!
        • Margo Smith
          Hi, Laura There was also a Slovak area in Chicago 1900-1920 along Huron and Iowa starting from what is now the Kennedy Expwy and going west.  The Catholics
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 24, 2012
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            Hi, Laura

            There was also a Slovak area in Chicago 1900-1920 along Huron and Iowa starting from what is now the Kennedy Expwy and going west.  The Catholics attended Sacred Heart Church (now closed and the building is a condo); Lutherans attended Trinity Slovak Lutheran Church (relocated in the 50s to Foster Ave. just west of the Edens Expwy -- actually about 5100 N. on one of the K streets). They were buried at St. Adalbert's (Catholics) and Bohemian National (non Catholics).  Overall there were about 5 or so Slovak Catholic parishes, but Sacred Heart is the one I know about.  I think Trinity has published some historical records with names of parishioners, but I haven't personally seen it.

            You might go to a larger public library that subscribes to one of the Chicago newspapers archive (e.g. Chicago Tribune) and search for your people by name.  I think Fold3 also has newspaper archives.

            Margo




            >________________________________
            > From: Laura <laura@...>
            >To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            >Sent: Tuesday, October 23, 2012 2:01 PM
            >Subject: [S-R] LUBINA: immigration to US
            >
            >

            >(My first post; rules said to type towns in caps?)
            >
            >I recently started trying to piece my family tree together from a pile of scrapnotes I'd collected from conversations with my grandparents over the years. Ancestry.com sure helps!
            >
            >Anyway, my grandparents came from a small village called Lubina, near Nove Mesto nad Vahom in NW Slovakia. From my research, it seems like a large percentage of that little village came over to the US in the early 1900s, *many* to St. Louis (a few to Chicago; and they also went back and forth between these two Slovak communities once in the US).
            >
            >I searched this site but didn't come across any threads on Lubina so I'll just ask now.....anyone here trace back to that region? Myjava, Lubina, several little towns around there that intermarried and immigrated to St. Louis. My relatives and their townfolk were mostly Lutheran, as far as I can tell. (Maybe the Catholics from that town went elsewhere? I don't know). I'm very interested in understanding the history of their emigration.
            >
            >Also, I know very little about the Slovak community in Chicago, but there definitely was an area centering around Dvorak Park. Anyone from there/know anything about the Slovak community in the early 1900-1940?
            >
            >Thanks!
            >Laura
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Laura
            Interesting. I tried mapping it, and the two communities are relatively far apart, strangely, so probably wouldn t have dealt much with each other back then.
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 24, 2012
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              Interesting. I tried mapping it, and the two communities are relatively far apart, strangely, so probably wouldn't have dealt much with each other back then. Otoh, if it was a Bohemian community, isn't that Czech? Were the two (Czech and Slovak) pretty separate back then? During the earliest immigration (1910s) from Lubina, I don't see a lot of intermingling between the two in census reports in St. Louis. I don't know about Chicago. In fact, my family doesn't pop up in Chicago until my grandfather returned (parents from Lubina, he was born in St. Louis, grew up in Lubina, then came back), joining other Stepanovic family in Chicago. I don't know how and when the other Slovaks got there, but they were there by the mid-1920s (around Dvorak Park). Thank you for the newspaper idea. I have family who still live in Chicago and am encouraging them to go to the upcoming meeting there. I'm trying to get them involved in this! :)
              Laura

              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Margo Smith <margolane61@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi, Laura
              >
              > There was also a Slovak area in Chicago 1900-1920 along Huron and Iowa starting from what is now the Kennedy Expwy and going west.  The Catholics attended Sacred Heart Church (now closed and the building is a condo); Lutherans attended Trinity Slovak Lutheran Church (relocated in the 50s to Foster Ave. just west of the Edens Expwy -- actually about 5100 N. on one of the K streets). They were buried at St. Adalbert's (Catholics) and Bohemian National (non Catholics).  Overall there were about 5 or so Slovak Catholic parishes, but Sacred Heart is the one I know about.  I think Trinity has published some historical records with names of parishioners, but I haven't personally seen it.
              >
              > You might go to a larger public library that subscribes to one of the Chicago newspapers archive (e.g. Chicago Tribune) and search for your people by name.  I think Fold3 also has newspaper archives.
              >
              > Margo
            • Laura
              Sorry, I replied too soon. I looked up the Slovak church anyway, and the historical information on their website helps explain this discrepancy, and fits in
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 24, 2012
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                Sorry, I replied too soon. I looked up the Slovak church anyway, and the historical information on their website helps explain this discrepancy, and fits in with what I know (in my understanding). FYI, if anyone is interested in the Chicago info (and I'd love to communicate further, if so!), it sounds like maybe the earliest Slovak immigration was up around Huron and Iowa (like you said, Margo, late 1800s and early 1900s); but that the Slovaks moved out from there, including further south. Therefore, they then built a Slovak church on 19th Place, which is at the edge of what I think of as my grandfather's Slovak community near Dvorak Park. He moved there in the mid 1920s to join Lubina Slovaks who were already there. I love it when things make sense! Very cool.
                Laura

                > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Margo Smith <margolane61@> > > There was also a Slovak area in Chicago 1900-1920 along Huron and Iowa starting from what is now the Kennedy Expwy and going west.  The Catholics attended Sacred Heart Church (now closed and the building is a condo); Lutherans attended Trinity Slovak Lutheran Church (relocated in the 50s to Foster Ave. just west of the Edens E
              • CurtB
                Laura, The history of Chicago Slovaks has yet to be written. Next to Pittsburgh and Cleveland, Chicago had the largest Slovak immigrant population. Over time
                Message 7 of 8 , Oct 24, 2012
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                  Laura,
                  The history of Chicago Slovaks has yet to be written. Next to Pittsburgh and Cleveland, Chicago had the largest Slovak immigrant population. Over time there were at least nine different communities of Slovaks in Chicago, not just the two already mentioned by others. There were at least five Catholic and four Evangelical Slovak churches, and a good number of other churches with large Slovak attendance.

                  The Chicago tribune may have some Slovak information, but there was a Slovak newspaper printed in Chicago - Osadne Hlasy- that is the one that has detailed information. It was published up until 1963, and it is, I think, available on microfilm.

                  Curt B.
                  --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Laura" <laura@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > (My first post; rules said to type towns in caps?)
                  >
                  > I recently started trying to piece my family tree together from a pile of scrapnotes I'd collected from conversations with my grandparents over the years. Ancestry.com sure helps!
                  >
                  > Anyway, my grandparents came from a small village called Lubina, near Nove Mesto nad Vahom in NW Slovakia. From my research, it seems like a large percentage of that little village came over to the US in the early 1900s, *many* to St. Louis (a few to Chicago; and they also went back and forth between these two Slovak communities once in the US).
                  >
                  > I searched this site but didn't come across any threads on Lubina so I'll just ask now.....anyone here trace back to that region? Myjava, Lubina, several little towns around there that intermarried and immigrated to St. Louis. My relatives and their townfolk were mostly Lutheran, as far as I can tell. (Maybe the Catholics from that town went elsewhere? I don't know). I'm very interested in understanding the history of their emigration.
                  >
                  > Also, I know very little about the Slovak community in Chicago, but there definitely was an area centering around Dvorak Park. Anyone from there/know anything about the Slovak community in the early 1900-1940?
                  >
                  > Thanks!
                  > Laura
                  >
                • Anabeth Dollins
                  Laura -- If your family was Lutheran, check the files on the yahoo Brezova group. We have transcriptions of some of the Trinity Slovak Lutheran Church records
                  Message 8 of 8 , Oct 28, 2012
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                    Laura --

                    If your family was Lutheran, check the files on the yahoo Brezova group. We
                    have transcriptions of some of the Trinity Slovak Lutheran Church records
                    there.

                    Anabeth

                    On Wed, Oct 24, 2012 at 1:10 PM, CurtB <curt67boc@...> wrote:

                    > **
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Laura,
                    > The history of Chicago Slovaks has yet to be written. Next to Pittsburgh
                    > and Cleveland, Chicago had the largest Slovak immigrant population. Over
                    > time there were at least nine different communities of Slovaks in Chicago,
                    > not just the two already mentioned by others. There were at least five
                    > Catholic and four Evangelical Slovak churches, and a good number of other
                    > churches with large Slovak attendance.
                    >
                    > The Chicago tribune may have some Slovak information, but there was a
                    > Slovak newspaper printed in Chicago - Osadne Hlasy- that is the one that
                    > has detailed information. It was published up until 1963, and it is, I
                    > think, available on microfilm.
                    >
                    > Curt B.
                    > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Laura" <laura@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > (My first post; rules said to type towns in caps?)
                    > >
                    > > I recently started trying to piece my family tree together from a pile
                    > of scrapnotes I'd collected from conversations with my grandparents over
                    > the years. Ancestry.com sure helps!
                    > >
                    > > Anyway, my grandparents came from a small village called Lubina, near
                    > Nove Mesto nad Vahom in NW Slovakia. From my research, it seems like a
                    > large percentage of that little village came over to the US in the early
                    > 1900s, *many* to St. Louis (a few to Chicago; and they also went back and
                    > forth between these two Slovak communities once in the US).
                    > >
                    > > I searched this site but didn't come across any threads on Lubina so
                    > I'll just ask now.....anyone here trace back to that region? Myjava,
                    > Lubina, several little towns around there that intermarried and immigrated
                    > to St. Louis. My relatives and their townfolk were mostly Lutheran, as far
                    > as I can tell. (Maybe the Catholics from that town went elsewhere? I don't
                    > know). I'm very interested in understanding the history of their emigration.
                    > >
                    > > Also, I know very little about the Slovak community in Chicago, but
                    > there definitely was an area centering around Dvorak Park. Anyone from
                    > there/know anything about the Slovak community in the early 1900-1940?
                    > >
                    > > Thanks!
                    > > Laura
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >


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