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Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test

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  • Michael Mojher
    Sue, I sent a link on Wikipedia: Genealogical DNA that explains a lot on the subject. From the article: Types of tests: There are three types of genealogical
    Message 1 of 21 , Jul 22, 2012
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      Sue,
      I sent a link on Wikipedia: Genealogical DNA that explains a lot on the subject. From the article:
      Types of tests: There are three types of genealogical DNA tests, autosomal (auDNA), mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and Y-Chromosome (Y-DNA). Autosomal tests for all ancestry. Y-DNA tests a male along his direct paternal line. mtDNA tests a man or woman along their direct maternal line. Any of these tests can be used to some degree for recent genealogy or for ethnic ancestry.

      Obviously which of these tests are being done is important to what you want to learn about your ancestry. I had a Y-DNA 37 marker test done through the Genographic Project. Out of their database the closest I got was a 36/37 match with one individual, who was French. What this revealed was we had a probability of a shared ancestor over a 1000 years ago. Talk about a distant cousin. What it does do is give you your Y-Chromosome Haplogroup. Mine was R1b1b2 or R-M269. The R1b Haplogroup, South European Eurasians covers most of Europe with an overlap in Slovakia with R1b-U106, North European Eurasians and R1a-Z280 Eastern Indo-Europeans.

      I had my test done because in the 12 century Hungary joined forces with Cumani to take a stand against Genghis Khan’s army. Some 12,000 Cumani were allowed to settle in Hungary. The Hungarians called them the Plavici. I was told that villages in Slovakia that began with PLAV were founded by the Plavici. My ancestral village is between PLAVnica and PLAVec. I did learn that the Cumani were used as soldiers at Plavec Castle to guard the trade road that went north into now Poland. A cousin was told by a doctor after blood tests, “Your blonde and blue-eyed, but you have an Asian blood type.”, the Cumani. The Cumani migrated from below Mongolia on the Yellow River and controlled territories beginning in the 9th century all the way to Italy by the 12th century.

      From: Sue Martin
      Sent: Sunday, July 22, 2012 5:19 AM
      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test



      Wikipedia has a lot of information, hopefully accurate. Hungarians, or Magyars, are Ugric, which is where the name came from. Those people are from the area of the Ural mountains, but apparently they've traced the Magyars back to east Asia, roughly where China is.

      That could explain the facial characteristics of 'pure' Magyars - high cheekbones and somewhat Asian-looking eyes.

      This information should show up on DNA tests. Has anyone found this to be the case?

      Sue

      -----Original Message-----
      From: mailto:lkocik%40comcast.net
      Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 7:33pm
      To: mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test

      Karen

      Aren't H ungarians descended from the Scandinavian group, as opposed to Slavic? I t goes back to the migration of the Sami out of A frica. There's a lot of speculation, and therories, but I th ought as the Sami migrated into Europe part of the group split off and became the L apps [Laplanders] and the rest of the group continued southward and were known as the Slavs.

      If it is of interest to you and you want to get the facts straight google sami or maybe it is samii.

      larry

      ----- Original Message -----

      From: "Karen Kosky" <[mailto:trixielixir%40yahoo.com] mailto:trixielixir%40yahoo.com>
      To: [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com] mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 5:20:09 PM
      Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test

      Nick, I'm glad you mentioned the person with Scandinavian results. My father's Y group is I1 which is curious because it is extremely common in Scandinavia, with some areas having as high as 50% of the male popultion sharing it. It is found to a lesser degree in other Europeans and Russians but everything I've ever found on it focuses on the Scandinavians. Slavic groups having I1 suggests a migration of Scandinavians into Central/Eastern Europe and Russia.

      Interpreting DNA results is a little like learning a new language. I am by no means fluent but have been learning as I go over the past year and a half. I am excited by Ancestry's breakdown (which again is in the infant stage and will be clarified more over time) because 23andme only uses 3 groups: European, African and Asian. So I show as 100% European there...quite boring!

      ________________________________
      From: Nick Kerpchar <[mailto:ccknk%40yahoo.com] mailto:ccknk%40yahoo.com>
      To: "[mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com] mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com" <[mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com] mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 3:06 PM
      Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test


      Karen,
      I found the ethnic results of your DNA test to be interesting. I hope what I have to write is still considered to be On Topic
      otherwise I will start a new thread.

      I don't recall where, but probably about a year ago, maybe a little less, someone with Carpatho-Rusyn heritage described the
      results of a DNA test they had done for ethnicity and they said a notable Scandinavian marker (I hope that is the correct term)
      was present. At the time I thought how interesting as I just read an article about Vikings settling in the Kiev area, integrating
      with the Slavs, and descendants of that group moving west into the present day Carpathian Mountains of northern and north-eastern
      Slovakia and south-eastern Poland.

      I am not familiar with how to read/interpret DNA test results but am intrigued with the information such as yours that hints at the
      links between ethnic groups. This has motivated me to start reading about DNA test results so I may better understand what it
      all means. Thank you for sharing, Nick

      ________________________________
      From: Karen Kosky <[mailto:trixielixir%40yahoo.com] mailto:trixielixir%40yahoo.com>
      To: "[mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com] mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com" <[mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com] mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 9:51 AM
      Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test

      You're right, Nick. I hadn't thought about it but the offer is for subscribers and I believe the yearly world rate is about $300. If you're not a subscriber and merely want the test, 23andme would be a better choice: $100 less and the ability to download raw data, which Ancestry doesn't give you as of now.

      ________________________________
      From: Nick Kerpchar <mailto:ccknk%40yahoo.com>
      To: "mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com" <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 10:37 AM
      Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test

      One thing not mentioned, or I may have missed it, about the Ancestory.com DNA project is that you have to be a member of
      Ancestory.com. I just looked at the site and that is what it said. One may look up membership fees but for a 6-month U.S.
      only access the cost appeared to be somewhere between $72 and $75 dollars, the "world" access is about double that amount
      for 6-months. If one were going to subscribe to Ancestory.com and start researching family genealogy, and wanted to do the
      DNA for the $99 then that would indeed be an attractive offer. But to subscribe to Ancestory.com just to do the "beta" DNA
      deal then it seems like the price would be very comparable to other commercial offerings. Like the saying goes, "You pay your
      money and you take your choice."
      Best wishes to everyone, Nick


      ________________________________
      From: Karen Kosky <mailto:trixielixir%40yahoo.com>
      To: "mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com" <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 7:52 AM
      Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test

      Personally, I was most impressed with 23andme. There is one comprehensive test which will provide you with all your raw data that you can download and transfer elsewhere. The relative finder feature allows you to compare your dna with your matches so you can actually group people to a likely common ancestor. For instance, there is a man in CA and a family in Canada who match me in the same places. They were thrilled when I came along because we were then able to narrow down to the same branch which they hadn't been able able to do up to that point. I just looked and the test is currently $299 but they do run specials from time to time you have an eye out for. Women are at a bit of a disadvantage as they do not have y-dna. It can be obtained by testing a male in the direct male line. I would have liked to test my father with 23andme, however, he has some medical problems that leave him with a difficulty in making saliva. 23's test is a tube you fill with
      saliva. I ended up testing him (and myself) with Family Tree DNA because they use a cheek swab. The advantages to FT are the swab and the fact that you have a pool of people who are there for the same purpose as you. The disadvantage is that there are several different tests as opposed to the one comprehensive one at 23. Therefore, you can really rack up huge costs having several tests performed. The mt test I did ($159) was clearly not as broad as 23's as it grouped me as merely a T haplogroup whereas 23 grouped me T2. FT wants me to buy an upgrade to further define my group, which of course I won't do, already knowing they'll only tell me what 23 did. The y test my father did ($169) was a 37 marker.67 goes for $248. And that's only y-dna. FT has a family finder similar to 23's relative finder but, guess what, for another expensive upgrade! I didn't do it until they allowed you to import raw data from another company for a much reduced price and was a
      bit disappointed to find many of my matches were already in my 23 list. All in all, I wasn't thrilled with FT but my father is the last male in that direct line so it was my only option. Ancestry DNA, by the way, uses the same saliva collection as 23. As of now, Ancestry is rough around the edges. What I like is that it immediately incorporates your trees. So if I click on a match, if will show me shared surnames and birth locations in both our trees. If you're interested in doing it, I would try to do it soon as they do say the $99 is a beta price and it will go up at an undefined time in the future. One last point about 23andme -- if you live in NY, as I do, you have to mail it from outside the state. They will ship it to you but you can't send it back from NY as NY claims it is medical advice and want you to pay thousands of dollars in a lab to which I say @#$%^! I simply gave it to a friend in Jersey to mail for me.

      ________________________________
      From: Ron <mailto:amiak27%40yahoo.com>
      To: mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 2:22 AM
      Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test

      Karen, since each organization seems to offer a variety of tests to cover various numbers of genes, which tests did you decide upon, how many 'points' (or genes), and which tests would you recommend?

      At the request of various family members I have tested with the 12 gene Nat Geo test, and find that seemingly worthless for narrowing down relationships. Thus I recommend a 37 or 60 something test if you can afford it. With the 23and me group, a second test I did at family request, I find I am too private a person to answer all of their questionnairs and get full benefit from the effort. Their medical results have been on target and they have been laughably off target, but we must remember they are always talking probabilities. And as you point out they are at the start of gathering information to build a more reliable statistical base.

      Again, your recommendations, please?

      Ron

      --- In mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@...> wrote:
      >
      > Ray, this is actually my 3rd DNA test. It just depends what you are looking for to choose a test. 23andme focuses on proclivities to various diseases/disorders and also provides you with some rather stunning personal traits, every single one was dead on in my experience. I first did this test because of my family history of Alzheimers. They do have a section called Relative Finder where I have 400+ matches, a few of which I've worked with on our trees. Many people at 23andme are there for the medical side and have no interest in genealogy, so if that is your main interest, it may not be for you. My second test was with Family Tree DNA. There is no medical or personal trait information, however, you will find there a pool of people solely interested in genealogy. Ancestry DNA is in beta testing so there is a bit of hoop-jumping to get it. There's a waiting list you have to get on; I requested in February and received the email to order it in June. It was
      > $99 (beta price) and took exactly 1 month to get results. The other companies were more expensive although you can at times find online coupons/specials which I used to take about $50 off. Again, Ancestry is brand new and it will take time to see the real benefits but I am most excited about this one because a lot more people who would not have ordinarily sought out such a test will jump on board because it's offered from a company they are comfortable with. Here is what they say about ethnic groupings:
      >
      > Genetic Ethnicity Prediction
      > We use cutting-edge science as a base for our predictions, but that comes with its own inherent challenges. It's an emerging field with exciting new discoveries and developments constantly changing the landscape. Right now, your genetic ethnicity may not look quite right, with some ethnicities under or over-represented. As scientists gain a deeper understanding of the data, our prediction models will evolve to provide you with more accurate and relevant information about your family history.
      > So in this early BETA period please let us know if your results seem off base, and don't be discouraged if they don't quite line up with your expectations. There's more to come.
      > A Few Tips:
      > * Consider the percentages given as accurate plus or minus a few percentage points.
      > * The "Uncertain" label includes one or more ethnic regions with too little information for us to confidently predict.
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: "CasperVeth@..." <CasperVeth@...>
      > To: mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Friday, July 20, 2012 9:55 PM
      > Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test
      >
      >
      > Â
      > Wow - the findings are rather interesting.
      >
      > I was thinking of taking a DNA test. Is Ancestry.com the best route to
      > take? Would you mind sharing will all how you went through the process?
      > Is there a particular address to request the test at Ancestry.com? How
      > much does it cost?
      >
      > Are there different levels of testing? How long did it take for them to
      > turn it around? Did they ask you to list your ancestry prior to them doing
      > the test (sorry if I sound a little skeptical on this question but I was
      > wondering if that would sway their results).
      >
      > Thanks in advance your help.
      >
      > Ray - Middletown, NJ
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 7/20/2012 9:47:32 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
      > trixielixir@... writes:
      >
      > Today my results came in. I have approximately 500 matches, although all
      > 5th to distant. I have a few known relations whose results have not yet come
      > in. My results are 61% Eastern European, 33% British Isles and 6% Unknown.
      > As it in still in Beta testing, I imagine this will be refined over time.
      > There are two things I found curious about it. First, Slovak is categorized
      > in the Eastern European group while Czech is Central European. They define
      > Eastern European as Poland, Greece, Macedonia, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia,
      > Romania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Ukraine, Lithuania, Latvia,
      > Estonia, Belarus, Moldova, Montenegro, Bulgaria, Belgarus, Kosovo. As they say
      > these results are based on genetic similarity and not geography, I was
      > surprised to not find Czech in that group. Second, I am surprised to find at
      > least 33% "British Isles" since I only have one grandparent that was Irish. I
      > understand DNA is not an exact science but I did expect it to be about 2 5%
      > give or take. I'm curious if anyone else has gotten results and what their
      > findings were.
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >

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    • htcstech
      Hello Sue (and moderators :) Magyar origins are still hotly debated among extreme pseudo-science and very conservative Western science that both base their
      Message 2 of 21 , Jul 22, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello Sue (and moderators :)

        Magyar origins are still hotly debated among extreme pseudo-science and
        very conservative 'Western' science that both base their conclusions on
        archaelogical and some linguistic evidence. Unfortunately the Wikipedia
        articles only reflect the conservative opinions. You really have to get
        into the studies to understand how this contentious debate originated from
        1770 to the present day.
        I can, but won't write reams about this. The only sure thing is that 'we'
        just don't know. There is a truth in all the theories, but none of the
        theories are all true. I suspect that this has something to do with the
        ethnic nature of up to 10 different tribes that first settled in Pannonia
        under the name of Ungars.

        The Hungarian genotypes turned out not to be conclusive, except in a
        negative way where some scholars pointed out that there wasn't enough
        evidence to suggest a biological Finn~Magyar relationship. The diaspora of
        the Hungarian peoples is multi-ethnic and finding a 'Magyar type' within
        the Hungarians proved difficult, even though they tested what they thought
        was a core Magyar district.

        Also, DNA itself doesn't contain time markers, so it is impossible to tell
        when an individual picked up foreign genes. Plotting DNA types and their
        movement around the world, with an interdiscipinary use of archaeology and
        statistics is fascinating stuff.

        Peter M.

        On 22 July 2012 22:19, Sue Martin <martin@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        >
        > Wikipedia has a lot of information, hopefully accurate. Hungarians, or
        > Magyars, are Ugric, which is where the name came from. Those people are
        > from the area of the Ural mountains, but apparently they've traced the
        > Magyars back to east Asia, roughly where China is.
        >
        > That could explain the facial characteristics of 'pure' Magyars - high
        > cheekbones and somewhat Asian-looking eyes.
        >
        > This information should show up on DNA tests. Has anyone found this to be
        > the case?
        >
        > Sue
        >
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: lkocik@...
        > Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 7:33pm
        > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test
        >
        > Karen
        >
        > Aren't H ungarians descended from the Scandinavian group, as opposed to
        > Slavic? I t goes back to the migration of the Sami out of A frica. There's
        > a lot of speculation, and therories, but I th ought as the Sami migrated
        > into Europe part of the group split off and became the L apps [Laplanders]
        > and the rest of the group continued southward and were known as the Slavs.
        >
        > If it is of interest to you and you want to get the facts straight google
        > sami or maybe it is samii.
        >
        > larry
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        >
        > From: "Karen Kosky" <[mailto:trixielixir%40yahoo.com]
        > trixielixir@...>
        > To: [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com] SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 5:20:09 PM
        > Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test
        >
        > Nick, I'm glad you mentioned the person with Scandinavian results. My
        > father's Y group is I1 which is curious because it is extremely common in
        > Scandinavia, with some areas having as high as 50% of the male popultion
        > sharing it. It is found to a lesser degree in other Europeans and Russians
        > but everything I've ever found on it focuses on the Scandinavians. Slavic
        > groups having I1 suggests a migration of Scandinavians into Central/Eastern
        > Europe and Russia.
        >
        > Interpreting DNA results is a little like learning a new language. I am by
        > no means fluent but have been learning as I go over the past year and a
        > half. I am excited by Ancestry's breakdown (which again is in the infant
        > stage and will be clarified more over time) because 23andme only uses 3
        > groups: European, African and Asian. So I show as 100% European
        > there...quite boring!
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Nick Kerpchar <[mailto:ccknk%40yahoo.com] ccknk@...>
        > To: "[mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com] SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com"
        > <[mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com] SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 3:06 PM
        > Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test
        >
        >
        > Karen,
        > I found the ethnic results of your DNA test to be interesting. I hope what
        > I have to write is still considered to be On Topic
        > otherwise I will start a new thread.
        >
        > I don't recall where, but probably about a year ago, maybe a little less,
        > someone with Carpatho-Rusyn heritage described the
        > results of a DNA test they had done for ethnicity and they said a notable
        > Scandinavian marker (I hope that is the correct term)
        > was present. At the time I thought how interesting as I just read an
        > article about Vikings settling in the Kiev area, integrating
        > with the Slavs, and descendants of that group moving west into the present
        > day Carpathian Mountains of northern and north-eastern
        > Slovakia and south-eastern Poland.
        >
        > I am not familiar with how to read/interpret DNA test results but am
        > intrigued with the information such as yours that hints at the
        > links between ethnic groups. This has motivated me to start reading about
        > DNA test results so I may better understand what it
        > all means. Thank you for sharing, Nick
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Karen Kosky <[mailto:trixielixir%40yahoo.com] trixielixir@...>
        >
        > To: "[mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com] SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com"
        > <[mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com] SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 9:51 AM
        > Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test
        >
        > You're right, Nick. I hadn't thought about it but the offer is for
        > subscribers and I believe the yearly world rate is about $300. If you're
        > not a subscriber and merely want the test, 23andme would be a better
        > choice: $100 less and the ability to download raw data, which Ancestry
        > doesn't give you as of now.
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Nick Kerpchar <mailto:ccknk%40yahoo.com>
        > To: "mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com" <mailto:
        > SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 10:37 AM
        > Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test
        >
        > One thing not mentioned, or I may have missed it, about the Ancestory.com
        > DNA project is that you have to be a member of
        > Ancestory.com. I just looked at the site and that is what it said. One may
        > look up membership fees but for a 6-month U.S.
        > only access the cost appeared to be somewhere between $72 and $75 dollars,
        > the "world" access is about double that amount
        > for 6-months. If one were going to subscribe to Ancestory.com and start
        > researching family genealogy, and wanted to do the
        > DNA for the $99 then that would indeed be an attractive offer. But to
        > subscribe to Ancestory.com just to do the "beta" DNA
        > deal then it seems like the price would be very comparable to other
        > commercial offerings. Like the saying goes, "You pay your
        > money and you take your choice."
        > Best wishes to everyone, Nick
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Karen Kosky <mailto:trixielixir%40yahoo.com>
        > To: "mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com" <mailto:
        > SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 7:52 AM
        > Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test
        >
        > Personally, I was most impressed with 23andme. There is one comprehensive
        > test which will provide you with all your raw data that you can download
        > and transfer elsewhere. The relative finder feature allows you to compare
        > your dna with your matches so you can actually group people to a likely
        > common ancestor. For instance, there is a man in CA and a family in Canada
        > who match me in the same places. They were thrilled when I came along
        > because we were then able to narrow down to the same branch which they
        > hadn't been able able to do up to that point. I just looked and the test is
        > currently $299 but they do run specials from time to time you have an eye
        > out for. Women are at a bit of a disadvantage as they do not have y-dna. It
        > can be obtained by testing a male in the direct male line. I would have
        > liked to test my father with 23andme, however, he has some medical problems
        > that leave him with a difficulty in making saliva. 23's test is a tube you
        > fill with
        > saliva. I ended up testing him (and myself) with Family Tree DNA because
        > they use a cheek swab. The advantages to FT are the swab and the fact that
        > you have a pool of people who are there for the same purpose as you. The
        > disadvantage is that there are several different tests as opposed to the
        > one comprehensive one at 23. Therefore, you can really rack up huge costs
        > having several tests performed. The mt test I did ($159) was clearly not as
        > broad as 23's as it grouped me as merely a T haplogroup whereas 23 grouped
        > me T2. FT wants me to buy an upgrade to further define my group, which of
        > course I won't do, already knowing they'll only tell me what 23 did. The y
        > test my father did ($169) was a 37 marker.67 goes for $248. And that's only
        > y-dna. FT has a family finder similar to 23's relative finder but, guess
        > what, for another expensive upgrade! I didn't do it until they allowed you
        > to import raw data from another company for a much reduced price and was a
        > bit disappointed to find many of my matches were already in my 23 list.
        > All in all, I wasn't thrilled with FT but my father is the last male in
        > that direct line so it was my only option. Ancestry DNA, by the way, uses
        > the same saliva collection as 23. As of now, Ancestry is rough around the
        > edges. What I like is that it immediately incorporates your trees. So if I
        > click on a match, if will show me shared surnames and birth locations in
        > both our trees. If you're interested in doing it, I would try to do it soon
        > as they do say the $99 is a beta price and it will go up at an undefined
        > time in the future. One last point about 23andme -- if you live in NY, as I
        > do, you have to mail it from outside the state. They will ship it to you
        > but you can't send it back from NY as NY claims it is medical advice and
        > want you to pay thousands of dollars in a lab to which I say @#$%^! I
        > simply gave it to a friend in Jersey to mail for me.
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Ron <mailto:amiak27%40yahoo.com>
        > To: mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 2:22 AM
        > Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test
        >
        > Karen, since each organization seems to offer a variety of tests to cover
        > various numbers of genes, which tests did you decide upon, how many
        > 'points' (or genes), and which tests would you recommend?
        >
        > At the request of various family members I have tested with the 12 gene
        > Nat Geo test, and find that seemingly worthless for narrowing down
        > relationships. Thus I recommend a 37 or 60 something test if you can afford
        > it. With the 23and me group, a second test I did at family request, I find
        > I am too private a person to answer all of their questionnairs and get full
        > benefit from the effort. Their medical results have been on target and they
        > have been laughably off target, but we must remember they are always
        > talking probabilities. And as you point out they are at the start of
        > gathering information to build a more reliable statistical base.
        >
        > Again, your recommendations, please?
        >
        > Ron
        >
        > --- In mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Ray, this is actually my 3rd DNA test. It just depends what you are
        > looking for to choose a test. 23andme focuses on proclivities to various
        > diseases/disorders and also provides you with some rather stunning personal
        > traits, every single one was dead on in my experience. I first did this
        > test because of my family history of Alzheimers. They do have a section
        > called Relative Finder where I have 400+ matches, a few of which I've
        > worked with on our trees. Many people at 23andme are there for the medical
        > side and have no interest in genealogy, so if that is your main interest,
        > it may not be for you. My second test was with Family Tree DNA. There is no
        > medical or personal trait information, however, you will find there a pool
        > of people solely interested in genealogy. Ancestry DNA is in beta testing
        > so there is a bit of hoop-jumping to get it. There's a waiting list you
        > have to get on; I requested in February and received the email to order it
        > in June. It was
        > > $99 (beta price) and took exactly 1 month to get results. The other
        > companies were more expensive although you can at times find online
        > coupons/specials which I used to take about $50 off. Again, Ancestry is
        > brand new and it will take time to see the real benefits but I am most
        > excited about this one because a lot more people who would not have
        > ordinarily sought out such a test will jump on board because it's offered
        > from a company they are comfortable with. Here is what they say about
        > ethnic groupings:
        > >
        > > Genetic Ethnicity Prediction
        > > We use cutting-edge science as a base for our predictions, but that
        > comes with its own inherent challenges. It's an emerging field with
        > exciting new discoveries and developments constantly changing the
        > landscape. Right now, your genetic ethnicity may not look quite right, with
        > some ethnicities under or over-represented. As scientists gain a deeper
        > understanding of the data, our prediction models will evolve to provide you
        > with more accurate and relevant information about your family history.
        > > So in this early BETA period please let us know if your results seem off
        > base, and don't be discouraged if they don't quite line up with your
        > expectations. There's more to come.
        > > A Few Tips:
        > > * Consider the percentages given as accurate plus or minus a few
        > percentage points.
        > > * The "Uncertain" label includes one or more ethnic regions with too
        > little information for us to confidently predict.
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________
        > > From: "CasperVeth@..." <CasperVeth@...>
        > > To: mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com
        > > Sent: Friday, July 20, 2012 9:55 PM
        > > Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test
        > >
        > >
        > > Â
        > > Wow - the findings are rather interesting.
        > >
        > > I was thinking of taking a DNA test. Is Ancestry.com the best route to
        > > take? Would you mind sharing will all how you went through the process?
        > > Is there a particular address to request the test at Ancestry.com? How
        > > much does it cost?
        > >
        > > Are there different levels of testing? How long did it take for them to
        > > turn it around? Did they ask you to list your ancestry prior to them
        > doing
        > > the test (sorry if I sound a little skeptical on this question but I was
        > > wondering if that would sway their results).
        > >
        > > Thanks in advance your help.
        > >
        > > Ray - Middletown, NJ
        > >
        > >
        > > In a message dated 7/20/2012 9:47:32 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
        > > trixielixir@... writes:
        > >
        > > Today my results came in. I have approximately 500 matches, although all
        > > 5th to distant. I have a few known relations whose results have not yet
        > come
        > > in. My results are 61% Eastern European, 33% British Isles and 6%
        > Unknown.
        > > As it in still in Beta testing, I imagine this will be refined over
        > time.
        > > There are two things I found curious about it. First, Slovak is
        > categorized
        > > in the Eastern European group while Czech is Central European. They
        > define
        > > Eastern European as Poland, Greece, Macedonia, Slovakia, Hungary,
        > Croatia,
        > > Romania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Ukraine, Lithuania, Latvia,
        > > Estonia, Belarus, Moldova, Montenegro, Bulgaria, Belgarus, Kosovo. As
        > they say
        > > these results are based on genetic similarity and not geography, I was
        > > surprised to not find Czech in that group. Second, I am surprised to
        > find at
        > > least 33% "British Isles" since I only have one grandparent that was
        > Irish. I
        > > understand DNA is not an exact science but I did expect it to be about 2
        > 5%
        > > give or take. I'm curious if anyone else has gotten results and what
        > their
        > > findings were.
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Cyndi Norwitz
        ... Ancestry has free memberships. You only pay for access to certain databases (the majority of them). In the US you can get a US membership or a World one.
        Message 3 of 21 , Jul 31, 2012
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          On Jul 21, 2012, at 7:37 AM, Nick Kerpchar wrote:

          > One thing not mentioned, or I may have missed it, about the Ancestory.com DNA project is that you have to be a member of
          > Ancestory.com. I just looked at the site and that is what it said. One may look up membership fees but for a 6-month U.S.
          > only access the cost appeared to be somewhere between $72 and $75 dollars, the "world" access is about double that amount
          > for 6-months. If one were going to subscribe to Ancestory.com and start researching family genealogy, and wanted to do the
          > DNA for the $99 then that would indeed be an attractive offer. But to subscribe to Ancestory.com just to do the "beta" DNA
          > deal then it seems like the price would be very comparable to other commercial offerings. Like the saying goes, "You pay your
          > money and you take your choice."

          Ancestry has free memberships. You only pay for access to certain databases (the majority of them). In the US you can get a US membership or a World one. In other countries you can buy World or get a country-specific one.

          I have had a free membership for many years. I had a paid one for 6 months when it came with my Family Tree Maker software. I was offered a chance to be on the waiting list for the DNA test even though my paid membership had expired. I'm still on the waiting list. I haven't decided yet if I'm going to do the Ancestry test. The cost is right but they don't give you access to raw data and it's unclear if they will in the future. If waiting for raw data was just the tradeoff for getting to be a beta tester at a reduced price ($99 vs two or three times that at other places), that would be fine. I just wish I knew.

          Please note there are three DNA tests:

          1) Autosomal (gives ethnicity breakdowns, can be taken by men or women, shows info from all maternal and paternal lines). The $99 Ancestry DNA test is autosomal (they also offer other tests).

          2) Y-DNA (can only be taken by men, only shows the paternal line, gives you a haplogroup, has the most research done about it).

          3) mt-DNA (can be taken by men or women, only shows the maternal line, gives you a haplogroup (completely different system from the Y ones)).

          So when you compare one company to another, be sure you state which test. It's not helpful when someone compares the Ancestry DNA test to a test from another company that gives a haplogroup, since they aren't the same test.

          I wish I had a male relative who was descended from my Slovakia line (Deutelbaum). But there aren't any I know. Would love to do a Y-DNA test. I might do an mt-DNA on me at some point to get my maternal Slovakian line. And I love the idea of autosomal too. It's just a budget thing.

          Cyndi
        • Nick Kerpchar
          Hi Cyndi, I did not know that Ancestory had free membership.  I know that they occasionally offer a free trial membership for a week or so but not
          Message 4 of 21 , Jul 31, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Cyndi,
            I did not know that Ancestory had free membership.  I know that they occasionally offer a free trial membership
            for a week or so but not open-ended.  Even if a free membership only provided limited data access that would still
            be a good thing.  Thank you very much for sharing this information.
             
            This DNA thing is intriguing and I too wish it was more economical.
             
            Nick


            ________________________________
            From: Cyndi Norwitz <cyndi@...>
            To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2012 10:40 AM
            Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test


             


            On Jul 21, 2012, at 7:37 AM, Nick Kerpchar wrote:

            > One thing not mentioned, or I may have missed it, about the Ancestory.com DNA project is that you have to be a member of
            > Ancestory.com. I just looked at the site and that is what it said. One may look up membership fees but for a 6-month U.S.
            > only access the cost appeared to be somewhere between $72 and $75 dollars, the "world" access is about double that amount
            > for 6-months. If one were going to subscribe to Ancestory.com and start researching family genealogy, and wanted to do the
            > DNA for the $99 then that would indeed be an attractive offer. But to subscribe to Ancestory.com just to do the "beta" DNA
            > deal then it seems like the price would be very comparable to other commercial offerings. Like the saying goes, "You pay your
            > money and you take your choice."

            Ancestry has free memberships. You only pay for access to certain databases (the majority of them). In the US you can get a US membership or a World one. In other countries you can buy World or get a country-specific one.

            I have had a free membership for many years. I had a paid one for 6 months when it came with my Family Tree Maker software. I was offered a chance to be on the waiting list for the DNA test even though my paid membership had expired. I'm still on the waiting list. I haven't decided yet if I'm going to do the Ancestry test. The cost is right but they don't give you access to raw data and it's unclear if they will in the future. If waiting for raw data was just the tradeoff for getting to be a beta tester at a reduced price ($99 vs two or three times that at other places), that would be fine. I just wish I knew.

            Please note there are three DNA tests:

            1) Autosomal (gives ethnicity breakdowns, can be taken by men or women, shows info from all maternal and paternal lines). The $99 Ancestry DNA test is autosomal (they also offer other tests).

            2) Y-DNA (can only be taken by men, only shows the paternal line, gives you a haplogroup, has the most research done about it).

            3) mt-DNA (can be taken by men or women, only shows the maternal line, gives you a haplogroup (completely different system from the Y ones)).

            So when you compare one company to another, be sure you state which test. It's not helpful when someone compares the Ancestry DNA test to a test from another company that gives a haplogroup, since they aren't the same test.

            I wish I had a male relative who was descended from my Slovakia line (Deutelbaum). But there aren't any I know. Would love to do a Y-DNA test. I might do an mt-DNA on me at some point to get my maternal Slovakian line. And I love the idea of autosomal too. It's just a budget thing.

            Cyndi


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Carol
            How do you access the free memberships to Ancestry?  I have been able to get it at the local library, but it would be nice to have it at home.   Carol ... I
            Message 5 of 21 , Jul 31, 2012
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              How do you access the free memberships to Ancestry?  I have been able to get it at the local library, but it would be nice to have it at home.   Carol

              --- On Tue, 7/31/12, Cyndi Norwitz <cyndi@...> wrote:







              On Jul 21, 2012, at 7:37 AM, Nick Kerpchar wrote:

              >Ancestry has free memberships. You only pay for access to certain databases (the majority of them). In the US you can get a US membership or a World one. In other countries you can buy World or get a country-specific one.

              I have had a free membership for many years. I had a paid one for 6 months when it came with my Family Tree Maker software. I was offered a chance to be on the waiting list for the DNA test even though my paid membership had expired. I'm still on the waiting list. I haven't decided yet if I'm going to do the Ancestry test. The cost is right but they don't give you access to raw data and it's unclear if they will in the future. If waiting for raw data was just the tradeoff for getting to be a beta tester at a reduced price ($99 vs two or three times that at other places), that would be fine. I just wish I knew.

              Please note there are three DNA tests:

              1) Autosomal (gives ethnicity breakdowns, can be taken by men or women, shows info from all maternal and paternal lines). The $99 Ancestry DNA test is autosomal (they also offer other tests).

              2) Y-DNA (can only be taken by men, only shows the paternal line, gives you a haplogroup, has the most research done about it).

              3) mt-DNA (can be taken by men or women, only shows the maternal line, gives you a haplogroup (completely different system from the Y ones)).

              So when you compare one company to another, be sure you state which test. It's not helpful when someone compares the Ancestry DNA test to a test from another company that gives a haplogroup, since they aren't the same test.

              I wish I had a male relative who was descended from my Slovakia line (Deutelbaum). But there aren't any I know. Would love to do a Y-DNA test. I might do an mt-DNA on me at some point to get my maternal Slovakian line. And I love the idea of autosomal too. It's just a budget thing.

              Cyndi






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Cyndi Norwitz
              ... They ve had free memberships for years. Just don t confuse membership with subscriptions. Subscriptions are not free, unless they re a deal from
              Message 6 of 21 , Aug 1 5:46 PM
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                On Jul 31, 2012, at 8:55 AM, Nick Kerpchar wrote:

                > Hi Cyndi,
                > I did not know that Ancestory had free membership. I know that they occasionally offer a free trial membership
                > for a week or so but not open-ended. Even if a free membership only provided limited data access that would still
                > be a good thing. Thank you very much for sharing this information.

                They've had free memberships for years. Just don't confuse membership with subscriptions. Subscriptions are not free, unless they're a deal from something (I got 6 months free for buying Family Tree Maker).

                Just go to http://www.ancestry.com/ and sign up.

                Free services include access to the discussion boards (full access), ability to maintain and edit a family tree, ability to send and receive messages to and from other members, access to many free databases (including the 1940 US Census), access to certain databases when Ancestry runs a special (they often open up a database or a set of them for a few days, usually on holiday weekends or around various events), and ability to run searches.

                When you click on a search finding to look at the listing or the scan of the actual document, if it's not a free database, you'll be taken to a page asking you to sign up for US or World subscriptions.

                Note that once you have a membership you have it forever. When I got my 6 month US subscription, I still used my same account, with all my saved info. I simply then had database access I didn't have before. When the subscription ended, I kept my account, I just lost some access.

                > This DNA thing is intriguing and I too wish it was more economical.

                Me too. It's the only thing holding me back.

                Cyndi
              • Nick Kerpchar
                Thank you Cyndi for the great information about Ancestory.  I am going to sign up today.   Nick ________________________________ From: Cyndi Norwitz
                Message 7 of 21 , Aug 2 7:40 AM
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                  Thank you Cyndi for the great information about Ancestory.  I am going to sign up today.
                   
                  Nick


                  ________________________________
                  From: Cyndi Norwitz <cyndi@...>
                  To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2012 7:46 PM
                  Subject: Re: [S-R] Ancestry DNA test



                   


                  On Jul 31, 2012, at 8:55 AM, Nick Kerpchar wrote:

                  > Hi Cyndi,
                  > I did not know that Ancestory had free membership. I know that they occasionally offer a free trial membership
                  > for a week or so but not open-ended. Even if a free membership only provided limited data access that would still
                  > be a good thing. Thank you very much for sharing this information.

                  They've had free memberships for years. Just don't confuse membership with subscriptions. Subscriptions are not free, unless they're a deal from something (I got 6 months free for buying Family Tree Maker).

                  Just go to http://www.ancestry.com/ and sign up.

                  Free services include access to the discussion boards (full access), ability to maintain and edit a family tree, ability to send and receive messages to and from other members, access to many free databases (including the 1940 US Census), access to certain databases when Ancestry runs a special (they often open up a database or a set of them for a few days, usually on holiday weekends or around various events), and ability to run searches.

                  When you click on a search finding to look at the listing or the scan of the actual document, if it's not a free database, you'll be taken to a page asking you to sign up for US or World subscriptions.

                  Note that once you have a membership you have it forever. When I got my 6 month US subscription, I still used my same account, with all my saved info. I simply then had database access I didn't have before. When the subscription ended, I kept my account, I just lost some access.

                  > This DNA thing is intriguing and I too wish it was more economical.

                  Me too. It's the only thing holding me back.

                  Cyndi




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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