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On-Line record Success

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  • Ed
    I just wanted to thank the group for pointing me toward the on-line records. I had not thought about selecting Slovakia, rather than Hungary, when I ve looked
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 25, 2012
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      I just wanted to thank the group for pointing me toward the on-line records. I had not thought about selecting Slovakia, rather than Hungary, when I've looked for records in the past.

      I managed to get three more generations back in almost all lines. Most were from Hummencz and having the records on-line, rather than just the index, filled in so much info. Since the indexes don't seem to do well with marriages and death records there was a lot of page by page viewing, but we found nearly everybody.

      One question that I have had, especially now that I find that my GGrandparents were classified as Zseller, or tenant farmers, was how did my Grandfather find his way to Vienna, to a Technical School there and become an engineer. Born in 1886, he immigrated to the US in 1905, so must have come right out of school and was hired as a machinist.

      How does a young boy from the country, with tenant farmers as parents manage to get a good education in Vienna?

      ED
    • htcstech
      That period was at the height of the Austro Hungarian industrialization and during times of peace. Peasant serfs didn t exist then and Zsellers owned their
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 25, 2012
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        That period was at the height of the Austro Hungarian industrialization and
        during times of peace. Peasant 'serfs' didn't exist then and Zsellers owned
        their house and land unless they were renting. Many younger people needed
        to be trained in the new technologies like electrical, welders, machinists
        and all other types of manufacturing. It was the AH industrial revolution.
        So in my family of Zsellers and Gazdas - typical farming community, many of
        the youth travelled to larger centres for work. They needed to be trained,
        often as cadets or apprentices.
        Most likely that's what happened to your Grandfather.
        I have evidence that my relatives and friends travelled to Budapest in
        small groups, lived in boarding houses and sought work. I actually have a
        'corporate' postcard inviting one of them for an interview to a large
        department store called 'Hangya' = Ant. Eventually he was sent to study
        textile technology (using large German made looms and yarn spinners).
        Others worked in foundries, railway yards, carpenters, machinists. One
        became a newspaper editor, another a technical teacher for engineers,
        another a photographer. One even became a 'brick woman'.
        But how did this happen? Initially through better schooling 'Gymnasium'
        where students can specialise at an earlier age. By the time they were 14
        or 15, they had enough credentials for better prospects.
        Industrialization was pushed hard by the Austrians and Timisoara was their
        pride and joy: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timi%C5%9Foara
        This city was called 'Little Vienna'.
        Your Gfather had the opportunity and took it. Good for him!

        Peter M.


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