Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Would Like Some Help If Possible

Expand Messages
  • Sandra Hansen
    I have been researching my Hungarian roots and have been led to believe that those roots may have begun in eastern Slovakia. The surname is JANU (without the
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 3, 2012
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      I have been researching my Hungarian roots and have been led to believe
      that those roots may have begun in eastern Slovakia. The surname is JANU
      (without the accent on the 'u'). It apparently is not a Hungarian surname,
      but a Slovakian one. My grandparents were born in Kislonya and Nagylonya
      Hungary. The 2 towns consolidated in 1934 to become Lonya. The town is
      very close to the very southeastern border of Slovakia. I have been able
      to obtain information regarding my Hungarian roots only as far back as my
      great-grandparents. I believe further research is needed to see if there
      is a Slovakian connection and perhaps my earlier relatives migrated from
      Slovakia to Hungary. Other than ancestry.com and LDS records, I am stumped
      for resources to see if there is just such a connection. Any advice would
      be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much. Sandra L Janu (McLean,
      Virginia)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • William C. Wormuth
      Sandra, There are some listings in the Phone Directory.  The Little O ovr the u in Janu is the Czech spelling. Z Bohom, Vilo
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 3, 2012
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Sandra,

        There are some listings in the Phone Directory.  The Little "O" ovr the u in Janu is the Czech spelling.

        Z Bohom,

        Vilo



        ________________________________
        From: Sandra Hansen <sjhoreo@...>
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, June 3, 2012 10:51 PM
        Subject: [S-R] Would Like Some Help If Possible


         
        I have been researching my Hungarian roots and have been led to believe
        that those roots may have begun in eastern Slovakia. The surname is JANU
        (without the accent on the 'u'). It apparently is not a Hungarian surname,
        but a Slovakian one. My grandparents were born in Kislonya and Nagylonya
        Hungary. The 2 towns consolidated in 1934 to become Lonya. The town is
        very close to the very southeastern border of Slovakia. I have been able
        to obtain information regarding my Hungarian roots only as far back as my
        great-grandparents. I believe further research is needed to see if there
        is a Slovakian connection and perhaps my earlier relatives migrated from
        Slovakia to Hungary. Other than ancestry.com and LDS records, I am stumped
        for resources to see if there is just such a connection. Any advice would
        be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much. Sandra L Janu (McLean,
        Virginia)

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • htcstech
        Hello Sandra, I can tell you how I found how my ancestors migrated from town to town until they settled. It s not easy work, though it paid dividends. That
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 3, 2012
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Hello Sandra,

          I can tell you how I found how my ancestors 'migrated' from town to town
          until they settled.
          It's not easy work, though it paid dividends.
          That is, to radiate outwards away from Lony, ignoring borders and check
          every church for records of the name - but only before the date of the last
          confirmed entry in Kiss~Nagy Lony. So if your GGParents were born in 1900,
          you are looking for records prior to that time. If you find no record
          working backwards for about 25 years, then move on. I prefer to start with
          death records as often they have the place of birth listed for the
          deceased.
          The easiest way to do this is to follow the road and river network of the
          time and by plotting the name Janu using the Cisarik website. Cisarik is
          not infallible as it only shows data from 1715 (tax records of peasants)
          and 2005+ telephone directory entries, but it may give clues.
          There are also tax records of 1720 where the name can be searchable.

          There are absolutely no guarantees in your belief that because Janu is not
          a Hungarian name, that it is Slovak/Rusyn or Czech. Millions of Hungarians
          have non-Hungarian names, and name etymology has proven in a significant
          amount of cases that last names do not equate to ethnicity. I think what
          you are actually looking for is the origin of the name?
          Janu is a form of John in Czech. In Hungarian it is Janos (nickname as Jani
          as in Johnny), Latin = Joannes. You should ask yourself how was that name
          given to your ancestor, or more correctly, why did he call himself that?
          When you go through that process and deal with the possibilities, it could
          come down to the following:
          1. He was named after the apostle - ie for religious or church reasons,
          maybe after a famous identity or a place referred to as Janu for example.
          2. His name was John, and his family was known as John's, so you had names
          like Maria John, George John etc.
          On that note, name order convention between Latin and Hungarian switched in
          1849, So John Miller became Miller John - Doubtful but possible. Most
          recently I have seen many examples of this as late as 1946, where family
          names were turned around between Czech and Magyar forms *on the same page*
          in official documentation AND spelled in Czech and not in the original
          Magyar.
          3. His name got Slavicised from Joannes to Janu.
          4. It was Jeno (Magyar) and due to local dialect, he was called Janu
          5. He was gyanús, therefore transliterated into Janu. Gyanus means
          suspicious and there is a form of the word spelled gyanu which sounds
          remarkably similar to janu. This is called 'ornametal naming' like
          'blondie' or 'woody' etc.

          You may be left with the conclusion that although Janu sounds unique, it is
          in fact untraceable to a specific location because of naming conventions.
          In your case it may not matter since you should be looking for
          concentrations of the name Janu in different towns and villages and that
          will provide the original location.

          On 4 June 2012 12:51, Sandra Hansen <sjhoreo@...> wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > I have been researching my Hungarian roots and have been led to believe
          > that those roots may have begun in eastern Slovakia. The surname is JANU
          > (without the accent on the 'u'). It apparently is not a Hungarian surname,
          > but a Slovakian one. My grandparents were born in Kislonya and Nagylonya
          > Hungary. The 2 towns consolidated in 1934 to become Lonya. The town is
          > very close to the very southeastern border of Slovakia. I have been able
          > to obtain information regarding my Hungarian roots only as far back as my
          > great-grandparents. I believe further research is needed to see if there
          > is a Slovakian connection and perhaps my earlier relatives migrated from
          > Slovakia to Hungary. Other than ancestry.com and LDS records, I am stumped
          > for resources to see if there is just such a connection. Any advice would
          > be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much. Sandra L Janu (McLean,
          > Virginia)
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Sandra Hansen
          Thank you so much for this valuable information. I will take your advice and work slowly backwards. I guess what I was really looking for was web sites to
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 4, 2012
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            Thank you so much for this valuable information. I will take your advice
            and work slowly backwards. I guess what I was really looking for was web
            sites to browse as I am only familiar with familysearch.org and ancestry.com.
            If anyone could recommend other web sites, I would be very grateful. Thank
            you again, Sandra

            On Mon, Jun 4, 2012 at 12:13 AM, htcstech <htcstech@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > Hello Sandra,
            >
            > I can tell you how I found how my ancestors 'migrated' from town to town
            > until they settled.
            > It's not easy work, though it paid dividends.
            > That is, to radiate outwards away from Lony, ignoring borders and check
            > every church for records of the name - but only before the date of the last
            > confirmed entry in Kiss~Nagy Lony. So if your GGParents were born in 1900,
            > you are looking for records prior to that time. If you find no record
            > working backwards for about 25 years, then move on. I prefer to start with
            > death records as often they have the place of birth listed for the
            > deceased.
            > The easiest way to do this is to follow the road and river network of the
            > time and by plotting the name Janu using the Cisarik website. Cisarik is
            > not infallible as it only shows data from 1715 (tax records of peasants)
            > and 2005+ telephone directory entries, but it may give clues.
            > There are also tax records of 1720 where the name can be searchable.
            >
            > There are absolutely no guarantees in your belief that because Janu is not
            > a Hungarian name, that it is Slovak/Rusyn or Czech. Millions of Hungarians
            > have non-Hungarian names, and name etymology has proven in a significant
            > amount of cases that last names do not equate to ethnicity. I think what
            > you are actually looking for is the origin of the name?
            > Janu is a form of John in Czech. In Hungarian it is Janos (nickname as Jani
            > as in Johnny), Latin = Joannes. You should ask yourself how was that name
            > given to your ancestor, or more correctly, why did he call himself that?
            > When you go through that process and deal with the possibilities, it could
            > come down to the following:
            > 1. He was named after the apostle - ie for religious or church reasons,
            > maybe after a famous identity or a place referred to as Janu for example.
            > 2. His name was John, and his family was known as John's, so you had names
            > like Maria John, George John etc.
            > On that note, name order convention between Latin and Hungarian switched in
            > 1849, So John Miller became Miller John - Doubtful but possible. Most
            > recently I have seen many examples of this as late as 1946, where family
            > names were turned around between Czech and Magyar forms *on the same page*
            > in official documentation AND spelled in Czech and not in the original
            > Magyar.
            > 3. His name got Slavicised from Joannes to Janu.
            > 4. It was Jeno (Magyar) and due to local dialect, he was called Janu
            > 5. He was gyan�s, therefore transliterated into Janu. Gyanus means
            > suspicious and there is a form of the word spelled gyanu which sounds
            > remarkably similar to janu. This is called 'ornametal naming' like
            > 'blondie' or 'woody' etc.
            >
            > You may be left with the conclusion that although Janu sounds unique, it is
            > in fact untraceable to a specific location because of naming conventions.
            > In your case it may not matter since you should be looking for
            > concentrations of the name Janu in different towns and villages and that
            > will provide the original location.
            >
            > On 4 June 2012 12:51, Sandra Hansen <sjhoreo@...> wrote:
            >
            > > **
            > >
            > >
            > > I have been researching my Hungarian roots and have been led to believe
            > > that those roots may have begun in eastern Slovakia. The surname is JANU
            > > (without the accent on the 'u'). It apparently is not a Hungarian
            > surname,
            > > but a Slovakian one. My grandparents were born in Kislonya and Nagylonya
            > > Hungary. The 2 towns consolidated in 1934 to become Lonya. The town is
            > > very close to the very southeastern border of Slovakia. I have been able
            > > to obtain information regarding my Hungarian roots only as far back as my
            > > great-grandparents. I believe further research is needed to see if there
            > > is a Slovakian connection and perhaps my earlier relatives migrated from
            > > Slovakia to Hungary. Other than ancestry.com and LDS records, I am
            > stumped
            > > for resources to see if there is just such a connection. Any advice would
            > > be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much. Sandra L Janu (McLean,
            > > Virginia)
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.