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Re: [S-R] TAX COLLECTORS

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  • htcstech
    Sorry - part of those quotes were in white text... This should be ok now. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 44 , Apr 18, 2012
      Sorry - part of those quotes were in white text... This should be ok now.

      On 19 April 2012 12:20, htcstech <htcstech@...> wrote:

      > A bit of clarification on Tax collection procedures.
      >
      > I found an on-line text: Hungary and Transylvania by John Paget (1850)
      > which looks like a faithful copy of the original I read a few months ago as
      > a pdf from a Hungarian source. As I can copy and paste from this, I'd like
      > to sahre what this educated English gentleman said about tax collection
      > circa 1835 - before the 1848 revolution.
      >
      > "There is still one part of the municipal system to be considered,�that
      > which refers to the local government of a village. Every Hungarian village
      > forms a Communitas in itself, and is governed by its own elected officers,
      > assesses and collects its own taxes, [551]<http://depts.washington.edu/cartah/text_archive/paget/pages/p1_551.jpg> GOVERNMENT
      > OF VILLAGES. and manages its own affairs, very much after its own fancy.
      > The Lord of the Manor, has, to a certain extent, the same power in the
      > village as the Monarch in the county."
      >
      > and
      >
      > "GENERAL TAXES. distribution of this, and the amount which comes to the
      > share of each village, the assessment on the individual peasants falls to
      > the Biro and his Jurassores (elected from the people and by the people of
      > the village - Peter M). The common manner of dividing it is so much per
      > head for every grown-up man ; and then so much on each article of
      > property,�as oxen, sheep, horses,�which he may possess. It is one of the
      > great advantages of an elected officer, that those who elect him are
      > commonly content with his manner of performing his duty; or, if they are
      > not, the remedy rests with themselves. I do not recollect in other parts of
      > Europe to have often seen the tax-gatherer and police-officers objects of
      > respect to their neighbours; while in Hungary I never heard of a Biro being
      > ill-regarded because he had performed his duty. It is a well-known fact,
      > that, when the peasant is perfectly unmanageable in the hands of the lord
      > or his steward, he is at once obedient to his own elected Biro."
      >
      > There were 2 taxes - a military tax and a domestic tax. Church tax was
      > food, wine and wood.
      >
      > It's not a long book, and contains descriptions of towns, landforms,
      > Slovaks and Jews of the time.
      > One interesting this that struck me was that many towns had a little
      > 'Cavalry Hill' where religious ceremonies were conducted!
      > A very interesting read.
      >
      > http://depts.washington.edu/cartah/text_archive/paget/toc_pag.shtml
      >
      > Peter M.
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • htcstech
      Sorry - part of those quotes were in white text... This should be ok now. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 44 of 44 , Apr 18, 2012
        Sorry - part of those quotes were in white text... This should be ok now.

        On 19 April 2012 12:20, htcstech <htcstech@...> wrote:

        > A bit of clarification on Tax collection procedures.
        >
        > I found an on-line text: Hungary and Transylvania by John Paget (1850)
        > which looks like a faithful copy of the original I read a few months ago as
        > a pdf from a Hungarian source. As I can copy and paste from this, I'd like
        > to sahre what this educated English gentleman said about tax collection
        > circa 1835 - before the 1848 revolution.
        >
        > "There is still one part of the municipal system to be considered,�that
        > which refers to the local government of a village. Every Hungarian village
        > forms a Communitas in itself, and is governed by its own elected officers,
        > assesses and collects its own taxes, [551]<http://depts.washington.edu/cartah/text_archive/paget/pages/p1_551.jpg> GOVERNMENT
        > OF VILLAGES. and manages its own affairs, very much after its own fancy.
        > The Lord of the Manor, has, to a certain extent, the same power in the
        > village as the Monarch in the county."
        >
        > and
        >
        > "GENERAL TAXES. distribution of this, and the amount which comes to the
        > share of each village, the assessment on the individual peasants falls to
        > the Biro and his Jurassores (elected from the people and by the people of
        > the village - Peter M). The common manner of dividing it is so much per
        > head for every grown-up man ; and then so much on each article of
        > property,�as oxen, sheep, horses,�which he may possess. It is one of the
        > great advantages of an elected officer, that those who elect him are
        > commonly content with his manner of performing his duty; or, if they are
        > not, the remedy rests with themselves. I do not recollect in other parts of
        > Europe to have often seen the tax-gatherer and police-officers objects of
        > respect to their neighbours; while in Hungary I never heard of a Biro being
        > ill-regarded because he had performed his duty. It is a well-known fact,
        > that, when the peasant is perfectly unmanageable in the hands of the lord
        > or his steward, he is at once obedient to his own elected Biro."
        >
        > There were 2 taxes - a military tax and a domestic tax. Church tax was
        > food, wine and wood.
        >
        > It's not a long book, and contains descriptions of towns, landforms,
        > Slovaks and Jews of the time.
        > One interesting this that struck me was that many towns had a little
        > 'Cavalry Hill' where religious ceremonies were conducted!
        > A very interesting read.
        >
        > http://depts.washington.edu/cartah/text_archive/paget/toc_pag.shtml
        >
        > Peter M.
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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