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Re: [S-R] Re: American WWII Prisoner of War Camps

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  • htcstech
    Ron and others, Thank you all. Great responses that have enlightened me somewhat on this issue. Looks like my father had some cause to be worried. I think he
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 11, 2011
      Ron and others,

      Thank you all. Great responses that have enlightened me somewhat on this
      issue.
      Looks like my father had some cause to be worried. I think he would have
      been repatriated back to Slovakia given time, but he took matters into his
      own hands and got back home a few months before.
      He passed away almost 20 years ago, but told me he started to miss
      'porridge' - cooked oats - that was a main food in the POW camps.
      Today 11/11/2011 at the 11th hour there was a minute's silence
      for Armistice Day - or Remembrance Day for Commonwealth Countries.
      Lest we Forget those who lost their lives in WWI

      Peter
      On 11 November 2011 14:20, Ron <amiak27@...> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > There were POW camps for the axis soldiers throughout the USA, including a
      > camp or two in Alaska, where there are some amusing stories of attempted
      > escapes being thwarted by raw nature.
      >
      > The first answers are good ones, and you can read more about forced
      > repatriation in the many histories in books and on line, including of Fr.
      > Tiso being returned to Czechoslovakia, and Russian and Ukrainian soldiers
      > being forcefully repatriated to Soviet control.
      >
      > Fears among the defeated soldiers ran from rational to irrational. I had
      > veterans in Germany tell me with solid belief that the US seriously
      > considered the Morgenthau plan to limit postwar Germany to agriculture
      > only, removing all industry. Another knew quite well that castration of all
      > defeated axis soldiers was considered as well.
      >
      > Those are quite ridiculous to us, but they evidently were taken quite
      > seriously by the defeated soldiers at the time.
      >
      > So after the brutality and slaughter of the war, the fear of never seeing
      > his homeland again was perhaps quite reasonable to your father.
      >
      > Ron
      >
      >
      > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, htcstech <htcstech@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello All,
      > >
      > > I was wondering if anyone knew/knows of US policy regarding repatriation
      > of > prisoners in WWII camps?
      > > My family history tells of an incident where my father, who was in a POW
      > > camp in Holland or Denmark, escaped with 3 other Hungarians and returned
      > to > his home town.
      > > Evidently, he was afraid that he would be sent to the US or another
      > country > and never see his family again.
      > >
      > > Now I know that would be improbable, but at the time he thought it was
      > more > than a possibility.
      > >
      > > Is there any evidence that the US military or occupational forces
      > > repatriated POWs to other countries or for that matter, sent POWs to the
      > > USA?
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > >
      > > Peter
      >
      >
      >


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