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Re: [S-R] Pronunciation of a surname

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  • CurtB
    Ladislav, Yes, Majer is German in origin as many Germans settled in Slovakia throughout history, but a common name in Slovakia. See all the Majer and Majerova
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 5, 2011
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      Ladislav,
      Yes, Majer is German in origin as many Germans settled in Slovakia throughout history, but a common name in Slovakia. See all the Majer and Majerova in the census and phone records.

      I know of two specific family occurences of the transition from Hungarian spelling of Magyer to current Majer in Slovakia.

      Curt B.

      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Ladislav Rosival" <lacoros@...> wrote:
      >
      > The slovak transcription of this name would be Mader - in 1995 there were 166 persons in Slovakia with this surname. Mostly in Stupava (50), Bratislava, ...
      >
      > http://slovniky.korpus.sk/?w=MAder&s=exact&c=ef97&lang=en&d=priezviska&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8
      >
      > The way to a Mayer or Majer is quite far - in spoken form - and they sound to german.
      >
      >
      > Ladislav
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: CurtB
      > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Friday, August 05, 2011 9:33 PM
      > Subject: Re: [S-R] Pronunciation of a surname
      >
      >
      >
      > Elaine,
      > Quite a different story. This one may be a bit more difficult. Remember that the writer is writing in the Hungarian alphabet and trying to express how the locals pronounce their name. So the name is probably just like Mayer in "Oscar Mayer". Spelled Majer in Slovak, but Mayer in German. Though, in strict Hungarian of the time it would be more like Mazher. With a very light touch in the zh part.
      >
      > Strange they didn't end up Mayer or Meyer in the U.S.,instead of Miller.
      >
      > Curt B.
      >
      > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Elaine Summerhill <jato791@> wrote:
      > >
      > > It sure looks like a surname to me but it also looks like I misspelled it. The name should have been written, MAGYER.
      > >
      > > https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-1-14323-22376-41%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10599568%c3%af%c2%bf%c2%bd (page 500, 31 Oct entry, just above November heading).
      > >
      > >
      > > Elaine
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > >________________________________
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >Magyar is the Hungarian word for Hungarian, referring both to its people and
      > > >its language. The "gy" is a Hungarian letter which is pronounced like [dj],
      > > >the sound you hear in the French word adieu. Most English-speaking people
      > > >tend to pronounce it MAG-yar, which of course is not quite correct.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >Janet
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • William
      When I visited Jablonov in Spis to find where my GF was born I was taken to what remains of a Majer which is a group of one-story homes, all connected.
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 7, 2011
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        When I visited Jablonov in Spis to find where my GF was born I was taken to what remains of a "Majer" which is a group of one-story homes, all connected. There were only a few left of where my GF was born. Most of them were torn down in the 1970's/80's because they were uninhabitable. I was given some photos taken in the early 80's on which someone had written "Majer" and that is how the local people referred to them.
        Just another bit of trivia.
        Bill

        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@...> wrote:
        >
        > Ladislav,
        > Yes, Majer is German in origin as many Germans settled in Slovakia throughout history, but a common name in Slovakia. See all the Majer and Majerova in the census and phone records.
        >
        > I know of two specific family occurences of the transition from Hungarian spelling of Magyer to current Majer in Slovakia.
        >
        > Curt B.
        >
        > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Ladislav Rosival" <lacoros@> wrote:
        > >
        > > The slovak transcription of this name would be Mader - in 1995 there were 166 persons in Slovakia with this surname. Mostly in Stupava (50), Bratislava, ...
        > >
        > > http://slovniky.korpus.sk/?w=MAder&s=exact&c=ef97&lang=en&d=priezviska&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8
        > >
        > > The way to a Mayer or Majer is quite far - in spoken form - and they sound to german.
        > >
        > >
        > > Ladislav
        > >
        > >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: CurtB
        > > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        > > Sent: Friday, August 05, 2011 9:33 PM
        > > Subject: Re: [S-R] Pronunciation of a surname
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Elaine,
        > > Quite a different story. This one may be a bit more difficult. Remember that the writer is writing in the Hungarian alphabet and trying to express how the locals pronounce their name. So the name is probably just like Mayer in "Oscar Mayer". Spelled Majer in Slovak, but Mayer in German. Though, in strict Hungarian of the time it would be more like Mazher. With a very light touch in the zh part.
        > >
        > > Strange they didn't end up Mayer or Meyer in the U.S.,instead of Miller.
        > >
        > > Curt B.
        > >
        > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Elaine Summerhill <jato791@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > It sure looks like a surname to me but it also looks like I misspelled it. The name should have been written, MAGYER.
        > > >
        > > > https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-1-14323-22376-41%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10599568%c3%af%c2%bf%c2%bd (page 500, 31 Oct entry, just above November heading).
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Elaine
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > >________________________________
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >Magyar is the Hungarian word for Hungarian, referring both to its people and
        > > > >its language. The "gy" is a Hungarian letter which is pronounced like [dj],
        > > > >the sound you hear in the French word adieu. Most English-speaking people
        > > > >tend to pronounce it MAG-yar, which of course is not quite correct.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >Janet
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
      • William
        When I visited Jablonov in Spis to find where my GF was born I was taken to what remains of a Majer which is a group of one-story homes, all connected.
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 7, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          When I visited Jablonov in Spis to find where my GF was born I was taken to what remains of a "Majer" which is a group of one-story homes, all connected. There were only a few left of where my GF was born. Most of them were torn down in the 1970's/80's because they were uninhabitable. I was given some photos taken in the early 80's on which someone had written "Majer" and that is how the local people referred to them.
          Just another bit of trivia.
          Bill

          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@...> wrote:
          >
          > Ladislav,
          > Yes, Majer is German in origin as many Germans settled in Slovakia throughout history, but a common name in Slovakia. See all the Majer and Majerova in the census and phone records.
          >
          > I know of two specific family occurences of the transition from Hungarian spelling of Magyer to current Majer in Slovakia.
          >
          > Curt B.
          >
          > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Ladislav Rosival" <lacoros@> wrote:
          > >
          > > The slovak transcription of this name would be Mader - in 1995 there were 166 persons in Slovakia with this surname. Mostly in Stupava (50), Bratislava, ...
          > >
          > > http://slovniky.korpus.sk/?w=MAder&s=exact&c=ef97&lang=en&d=priezviska&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8
          > >
          > > The way to a Mayer or Majer is quite far - in spoken form - and they sound to german.
          > >
          > >
          > > Ladislav
          > >
          > >
          > > ----- Original Message -----
          > > From: CurtB
          > > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          > > Sent: Friday, August 05, 2011 9:33 PM
          > > Subject: Re: [S-R] Pronunciation of a surname
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Elaine,
          > > Quite a different story. This one may be a bit more difficult. Remember that the writer is writing in the Hungarian alphabet and trying to express how the locals pronounce their name. So the name is probably just like Mayer in "Oscar Mayer". Spelled Majer in Slovak, but Mayer in German. Though, in strict Hungarian of the time it would be more like Mazher. With a very light touch in the zh part.
          > >
          > > Strange they didn't end up Mayer or Meyer in the U.S.,instead of Miller.
          > >
          > > Curt B.
          > >
          > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Elaine Summerhill <jato791@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > It sure looks like a surname to me but it also looks like I misspelled it. The name should have been written, MAGYER.
          > > >
          > > > https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-1-14323-22376-41%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10599568%c3%af%c2%bf%c2%bd (page 500, 31 Oct entry, just above November heading).
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Elaine
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > >________________________________
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >Magyar is the Hungarian word for Hungarian, referring both to its people and
          > > > >its language. The "gy" is a Hungarian letter which is pronounced like [dj],
          > > > >the sound you hear in the French word adieu. Most English-speaking people
          > > > >tend to pronounce it MAG-yar, which of course is not quite correct.
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >Janet
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
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