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Reading Cyrillic Names

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  • Ron
    Finding your Name in Cyrillic and Cursive Cyrillic Records With eyes trained to read the Latin alphabet, what can we do to read hand written records in
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 5, 2011
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      Finding your Name in Cyrillic and Cursive Cyrillic Records

      With eyes trained to read the Latin alphabet, what can we do to read hand written records in Cyrillic?

      Here is one solution.

      First, take full advantage of the tabular format for most church records to help locate key words and names quickly. Headers can be deciphered by using word lists and references at sites like Bill T's, but we can also puzzle out names with a bit more effort.

      Start by listing all the variations on the family names, e.g.: Matviak, Matviyak, Matvijak, Matfiak and then visit another great product by Steve Morse at

      http://stevemorse.org/russian/cyrprintcurs.html?font=print

      and methodically enter all of the variations in UPPER CASE, in lower case, and again in Cursive. Take a screen shot of each page as it is generated. Crop these and assemble them on a single reference page for printing. Later hold this next to the record so you can match the "patterns" formed by the names.

      Having transcirptions in upper, lower and cursive should help with reading writing from different scribes, different times, and different spelling / writing conventions (standard writing did change over time).

      Another simplification when looking for names is to first look for the first four letters, and when these match up, check the full name. That is much easier and quicker than trying to scan the entire name at once in Cyrillic.

      Seeing the family names in small case cursive Cyrillic can be quite a shock. The names look very different than they do in printed Cyrillic.

      I hope this method helps a few of you and opens a few doors. The method is tedious, but should pay off in the final hunt.

      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@...> wrote:
      >
      > Peg,
      > Yes, this register is in Rusyn, written in the Cyrillic alphabet. If you just want to read the names you can memorize the alphabet and their sound equilavents, though you will need a copy in both small and capital script as well as printing.
      >
      > Not for the faint of heart!!
      >
      > If you need only a small part or set of dates and not the whole register, I will be happy to check it for you and translate.
      >
      > Curt B.
      >
      > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Peg's Gmail <pegivanyo@> wrote:
      > >
      > > OK, I know I've taken more than my share of time today. But then, I have been kind of quite up until now :) I beg your patience.
      > >
      > > Someone please tell me this record is not written in Cyrillic! All of a sudden things have taken a turn for the impossible to read and understand. If it is, what suggestions do you have for learning how to pick out the surnames I'm looking for (and then extract the results). If it is not, then what is it?
      > >
      > > Peg
    • Peg's Gmail
      OK, Curt or Elaine--I will take you up on your kind offer. Please speak up when you begin so you both don t waste your time doing the same thing. I did glance
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 5, 2011
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        OK, Curt or Elaine--I will take you up on your kind offer. Please speak up when you begin so you both don't waste your time doing the same thing.

        I did glance around through several other sets of records last night and found that I will definitely need to start learning how to do this sooner than I originally believed when I start on some extended records. For now, it would appear that just a few pages here and there in these earlier (how do you call 1832-1860 earlier?!) records are in Cyrillic. The rest are either in Hungarian or Latin.

        Beginning with image 29 of 94, for the Blatne Reviste, Sobrance, Greek Catholic records 1832-1860, and ending with image 48, the records are written in Cyrillic.
        Here is the link to image 29:
        https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11022-57613-89%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10598381

        Note there are two pages per image as is typical with these records. We are in the baptismal records. I am extracting any record that has a parent with the surname of IVANYO or Ivanyov or Ivanyouv. It sounds like you said Cyrillic has a lot to do with sound, so you should know that the I makes a long E sound and the "an" really sounds like "on". It would sound like E-von-yo (long o).

        And just in case.....I'm also extracting the name PENAK. Normally I wouldn't bother to mention this, as they lived in a completely different village. The Ivanyos lived in Zavatka and attended church in Sarosreviscse, which is present-day Blatne Reviste. The Penaks lived in Vinne, which was then called Vinnabanka, and attended church in the same village. However, in extracting records from this particular section I found one Pinak, with an i. Could have been visiting family or who knows what, but I'd hate to miss them. So, Penak is pronounced Pen-jhak.

        At this point in time, I'm extracting all information for related entries EXCEPT the name of the priest and the godparents--neither of those will help me link relationships at this point in time and I can always come back as long as I know which image and entry to come back to. If that is too much to do, just a note with which images and entries have Ivanyo or Penak on them would be helpful; then I can eventually learn to struggle my way through the rest.

        I will owe you big time for this one!

        Thanks again!

        Peg (Ivanyo)




        On Aug 4, 2011, at 11:30 PM, Elaine Summerhill wrote:

        > I also would be happy to check for you. Which surnames are you searching and about when?
        >
        > Elaine S.
        >
        > >________________________________
        > >Peg,
        > >Yes, this register is in Rusyn, written in the Cyrillic alphabet. If you just want to read the names you can memorize the alphabet and their sound equilavents, though you will need a copy in both small and capital script as well as printing.
        > >
        > >Not for the faint of heart!!
        > >
        > >If you need only a small part or set of dates and not the whole register, I will be happy to check it for you and translate.
        > >
        > >Curt B.
        > >
        > >--- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Peg's Gmail <pegivanyo@...> wrote:
        > >>
        > >> OK, I know I've taken more than my share of time today. But then, I have been kind of quite up until now :) I beg your patience.
        > >>
        > >> Someone please tell me this record is not written in Cyrillic! All of a sudden things have taken a turn for the impossible to read and understand. If it is, what suggestions do you have for learning how to pick out the surnames I'm looking for (and then extract the results). If it is not, then what is it?
        > >>
        > >> Peg
        > >>
        > >> https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11022-57614-80%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10598381
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >------------------------------------
        > >
        > >PLEASE STAY ON-TOPIC (GENEALOGY). OFF-TOPIC ITEMS WILL BE BLOCKED.
        > >
        > >To visit your group on the web, go to:
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
        > >
        > >To unsubscribe from this group, go to http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • CurtB
        Peg, I offered to check a few dates or entries, but 40 pages with transcription and translation of two possible surnames is a project I do not have the time
        Message 3 of 15 , Aug 5, 2011
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          Peg,
          I offered to check a few dates or entries, but 40 pages with transcription and translation of two possible surnames is a project I do not have the time for now.

          Curt B.

          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Peg's Gmail <pegivanyo@...> wrote:
          >
          > OK, Curt or Elaine--I will take you up on your kind offer. Please speak up when you begin so you both don't waste your time doing the same thing.
          >
          > I did glance around through several other sets of records last night and found that I will definitely need to start learning how to do this sooner than I originally believed when I start on some extended records. For now, it would appear that just a few pages here and there in these earlier (how do you call 1832-1860 earlier?!) records are in Cyrillic. The rest are either in Hungarian or Latin.
          >
          > Beginning with image 29 of 94, for the Blatne Reviste, Sobrance, Greek Catholic records 1832-1860, and ending with image 48, the records are written in Cyrillic.
          > Here is the link to image 29:
          > https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11022-57613-89%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10598381
          >
          > Note there are two pages per image as is typical with these records. We are in the baptismal records. I am extracting any record that has a parent with the surname of IVANYO or Ivanyov or Ivanyouv. It sounds like you said Cyrillic has a lot to do with sound, so you should know that the I makes a long E sound and the "an" really sounds like "on". It would sound like E-von-yo (long o).
          >
          > And just in case.....I'm also extracting the name PENAK. Normally I wouldn't bother to mention this, as they lived in a completely different village. The Ivanyos lived in Zavatka and attended church in Sarosreviscse, which is present-day Blatne Reviste. The Penaks lived in Vinne, which was then called Vinnabanka, and attended church in the same village. However, in extracting records from this particular section I found one Pinak, with an i. Could have been visiting family or who knows what, but I'd hate to miss them. So, Penak is pronounced Pen-jhak.
          >
          > At this point in time, I'm extracting all information for related entries EXCEPT the name of the priest and the godparents--neither of those will help me link relationships at this point in time and I can always come back as long as I know which image and entry to come back to. If that is too much to do, just a note with which images and entries have Ivanyo or Penak on them would be helpful; then I can eventually learn to struggle my way through the rest.
          >
          > I will owe you big time for this one!
          >
          > Thanks again!
          >
          > Peg (Ivanyo)
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > On Aug 4, 2011, at 11:30 PM, Elaine Summerhill wrote:
          >
          > > I also would be happy to check for you. Which surnames are you searching and about when?
          > >
          > > Elaine S.
          > >
          > > >________________________________
          > > >Peg,
          > > >Yes, this register is in Rusyn, written in the Cyrillic alphabet. If you just want to read the names you can memorize the alphabet and their sound equilavents, though you will need a copy in both small and capital script as well as printing.
          > > >
          > > >Not for the faint of heart!!
          > > >
          > > >If you need only a small part or set of dates and not the whole register, I will be happy to check it for you and translate.
          > > >
          > > >Curt B.
          > > >
          > > >--- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Peg's Gmail <pegivanyo@> wrote:
          > > >>
          > > >> OK, I know I've taken more than my share of time today. But then, I have been kind of quite up until now :) I beg your patience.
          > > >>
          > > >> Someone please tell me this record is not written in Cyrillic! All of a sudden things have taken a turn for the impossible to read and understand. If it is, what suggestions do you have for learning how to pick out the surnames I'm looking for (and then extract the results). If it is not, then what is it?
          > > >>
          > > >> Peg
          > > >>
          > > >> https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11022-57614-80%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10598381
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > >>
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >------------------------------------
          > > >
          > > >PLEASE STAY ON-TOPIC (GENEALOGY). OFF-TOPIC ITEMS WILL BE BLOCKED.
          > > >
          > > >To visit your group on the web, go to:
          > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
          > > >
          > > >To unsubscribe from this group, go to http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@...! Groups Links
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Elaine Summerhill
          Ivanyo in Cyrillic would look like иванё.  In script, the и looks like a capital U .  Penak looks like пенак .  The P looks like the
          Message 4 of 15 , Aug 5, 2011
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            Ivanyo in Cyrillic would look like иванё.  In script, the "и" looks like a capital "U".  Penak looks like "пенак".  The "P" looks like the symbol for "pi".   I know Russian, which is why I know the Cyrillic alphabet.  Wiki has a Cyrillic alphabet online here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_alphabet, if you want to teach yourself the alphabet.

            I will take a look as time allows to help you out.  I wasn't expecting to go through so many records for you, oops. I do not know any Hungarian.

            Elaine

            >________________________________
            >
            >>
            >> I did glance around through several other sets of records last night and found that I will definitely need to start learning how to do this sooner than I originally believed when I start on some extended records.  For now, it would appear that just a few pages here and there in these earlier (how do you call 1832-1860 earlier?!) records are in Cyrillic.  The rest are either in Hungarian or Latin.
            >>
            >> Beginning with image 29 of 94, for the Blatne Reviste, Sobrance, Greek Catholic records 1832-1860, and ending with image 48, the records are written in Cyrillic.
            >> Here is the link to image 29:
            >> https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11022-57613-89%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10598381
            >>
            >> Note there are two pages per image as is typical with these records.  We are in the baptismal records.  I am extracting any record that has a parent with the surname of IVANYO or Ivanyov or Ivanyouv.  It sounds like you said Cyrillic has a lot to do with sound, so you should know that the I makes a long E sound and the "an" really sounds like "on".  It would sound like E-von-yo (long o). 
            >>
            >> And just in case.....I'm also extracting the name PENAK.  Normally I wouldn't bother to mention this, as they lived in a completely different village.  The Ivanyos lived in Zavatka and attended church in Sarosreviscse, which is present-day Blatne Reviste.  The Penaks lived in Vinne, which was then called Vinnabanka, and attended church in the same village.  However, in extracting records from this particular section I found one Pinak, with an i.  Could have been visiting family or who knows what, but I'd hate to miss them.  So, Penak is pronounced Pen-jhak.
            >>
            >> At this point in time, I'm extracting all information for related entries EXCEPT the name of the priest and the godparents--neither of those will help me link relationships at this point in time and I can always come back as long as I know which image and entry to come back to.  If that is too much to do, just a note with which images and entries have Ivanyo or Penak on them would be helpful; then I can eventually learn to struggle my way through the rest.
            >>
            >> I will owe you big time for this one! 
            >>
            >> Thanks again!
            >>
            >> Peg (Ivanyo)
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Peg's Gmail
            This is great. That way I ll be able to start learning to find the names myself. Thanks! Peg ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 15 , Aug 6, 2011
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              This is great. That way I'll be able to start learning to find the names myself. Thanks!
              Peg


              On Aug 5, 2011, at 9:19 PM, Elaine Summerhill wrote:

              > Ivanyo in Cyrillic would look like иванё. In script, the "и" looks like a capital "U". Penak looks like "пенак". The "P" looks like the symbol for "pi". I know Russian, which is why I know the Cyrillic alphabet. Wiki has a Cyrillic alphabet online here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_alphabet, if you want to teach yourself the alphabet.
              >
              > I will take a look as time allows to help you out. I wasn't expecting to go through so many records for you, oops. I do not know any Hungarian.
              >
              > Elaine
              >
              > >________________________________
              > >
              > >>
              > >> I did glance around through several other sets of records last night and found that I will definitely need to start learning how to do this sooner than I originally believed when I start on some extended records. For now, it would appear that just a few pages here and there in these earlier (how do you call 1832-1860 earlier?!) records are in Cyrillic. The rest are either in Hungarian or Latin.
              > >>
              > >> Beginning with image 29 of 94, for the Blatne Reviste, Sobrance, Greek Catholic records 1832-1860, and ending with image 48, the records are written in Cyrillic.
              > >> Here is the link to image 29:
              > >> https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11022-57613-89%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10598381
              > >>
              > >> Note there are two pages per image as is typical with these records. We are in the baptismal records. I am extracting any record that has a parent with the surname of IVANYO or Ivanyov or Ivanyouv. It sounds like you said Cyrillic has a lot to do with sound, so you should know that the I makes a long E sound and the "an" really sounds like "on". It would sound like E-von-yo (long o).
              > >>
              > >> And just in case.....I'm also extracting the name PENAK. Normally I wouldn't bother to mention this, as they lived in a completely different village. The Ivanyos lived in Zavatka and attended church in Sarosreviscse, which is present-day Blatne Reviste. The Penaks lived in Vinne, which was then called Vinnabanka, and attended church in the same village. However, in extracting records from this particular section I found one Pinak, with an i. Could have been visiting family or who knows what, but I'd hate to miss them. So, Penak is pronounced Pen-jhak.
              > >>
              > >> At this point in time, I'm extracting all information for related entries EXCEPT the name of the priest and the godparents--neither of those will help me link relationships at this point in time and I can always come back as long as I know which image and entry to come back to. If that is too much to do, just a note with which images and entries have Ivanyo or Penak on them would be helpful; then I can eventually learn to struggle my way through the rest.
              > >>
              > >> I will owe you big time for this one!
              > >>
              > >> Thanks again!
              > >>
              > >> Peg (Ivanyo)
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >
              > >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • CurtB
              Peg, Go to image number 31, line 21. There you will find a child Mikhail , born to Pavol Ivano. This should give you some idea of what the Cyrillic feels
              Message 6 of 15 , Aug 6, 2011
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                Peg,
                Go to image number 31, line 21.

                There you will find a child Mikhail', born to Pavol Ivano. This should give you some idea of what the Cyrillic feels like.
                Note that the capital letter of the Ivano last name follows the Rusyn pattern with an I, instead of the traditional capital that looks like U capital found in Russian.

                Curt B.

                --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Peg's Gmail <pegivanyo@...> wrote:
                >
                > This is great. That way I'll be able to start learning to find the names myself. Thanks!
                > Peg
                >
                >
                > On Aug 5, 2011, at 9:19 PM, Elaine Summerhill wrote:
                >
                > > Ivanyo in Cyrillic would look like иванÑ`. In script, the "и" looks like a capital "U". Penak looks like "пенак". The "P" looks like the symbol for "pi". I know Russian, which is why I know the Cyrillic alphabet. Wiki has a Cyrillic alphabet online here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_alphabet, if you want to teach yourself the alphabet.
                > >
                > > I will take a look as time allows to help you out. I wasn't expecting to go through so many records for you, oops. I do not know any Hungarian.
                > >
                > > Elaine
                > >
                > > >________________________________
                > > >
                > > >>
                > > >> I did glance around through several other sets of records last night and found that I will definitely need to start learning how to do this sooner than I originally believed when I start on some extended records. For now, it would appear that just a few pages here and there in these earlier (how do you call 1832-1860 earlier?!) records are in Cyrillic. The rest are either in Hungarian or Latin.
                > > >>
                > > >> Beginning with image 29 of 94, for the Blatne Reviste, Sobrance, Greek Catholic records 1832-1860, and ending with image 48, the records are written in Cyrillic.
                > > >> Here is the link to image 29:
                > > >> https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11022-57613-89%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10598381
                > > >>
                > > >> Note there are two pages per image as is typical with these records. We are in the baptismal records. I am extracting any record that has a parent with the surname of IVANYO or Ivanyov or Ivanyouv. It sounds like you said Cyrillic has a lot to do with sound, so you should know that the I makes a long E sound and the "an" really sounds like "on". It would sound like E-von-yo (long o).
                > > >>
                > > >> And just in case.....I'm also extracting the name PENAK. Normally I wouldn't bother to mention this, as they lived in a completely different village. The Ivanyos lived in Zavatka and attended church in Sarosreviscse, which is present-day Blatne Reviste. The Penaks lived in Vinne, which was then called Vinnabanka, and attended church in the same village. However, in extracting records from this particular section I found one Pinak, with an i. Could have been visiting family or who knows what, but I'd hate to miss them. So, Penak is pronounced Pen-jhak.
                > > >>
                > > >> At this point in time, I'm extracting all information for related entries EXCEPT the name of the priest and the godparents--neither of those will help me link relationships at this point in time and I can always come back as long as I know which image and entry to come back to. If that is too much to do, just a note with which images and entries have Ivanyo or Penak on them would be helpful; then I can eventually learn to struggle my way through the rest.
                > > >>
                > > >> I will owe you big time for this one!
                > > >>
                > > >> Thanks again!
                > > >>
                > > >> Peg (Ivanyo)
                > > >>
                > > >>
                > > >>
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • CurtB
                Peg, One more example to help you get used to spotting your names in Cyrillic script. Image 32, line 3, 30 Jan 1855. Child Zuzanna born to Ioan Ivano. Curt
                Message 7 of 15 , Aug 6, 2011
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                  Peg,
                  One more example to help you get used to spotting your names in Cyrillic script. Image 32, line 3, 30 Jan 1855. Child Zuzanna born to Ioan Ivano.

                  Curt B.



                  --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Peg's Gmail <pegivanyo@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > This is great. That way I'll be able to start learning to find the names myself. Thanks!
                  > Peg
                  >
                  >
                  > On Aug 5, 2011, at 9:19 PM, Elaine Summerhill wrote:
                  >
                  > > Ivanyo in Cyrillic would look like иванÑ`. In script, the "и" looks like a capital "U". Penak looks like "пенак". The "P" looks like the symbol for "pi". I know Russian, which is why I know the Cyrillic alphabet. Wiki has a Cyrillic alphabet online here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_alphabet, if you want to teach yourself the alphabet.
                  > >
                  > > I will take a look as time allows to help you out. I wasn't expecting to go through so many records for you, oops. I do not know any Hungarian.
                  > >
                  > > Elaine
                  > >
                  > > >________________________________
                  > > >
                  > > >>
                  > > >> I did glance around through several other sets of records last night and found that I will definitely need to start learning how to do this sooner than I originally believed when I start on some extended records. For now, it would appear that just a few pages here and there in these earlier (how do you call 1832-1860 earlier?!) records are in Cyrillic. The rest are either in Hungarian or Latin.
                  > > >>
                  > > >> Beginning with image 29 of 94, for the Blatne Reviste, Sobrance, Greek Catholic records 1832-1860, and ending with image 48, the records are written in Cyrillic.
                  > > >> Here is the link to image 29:
                  > > >> https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11022-57613-89%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10598381
                  > > >>
                  > > >> Note there are two pages per image as is typical with these records. We are in the baptismal records. I am extracting any record that has a parent with the surname of IVANYO or Ivanyov or Ivanyouv. It sounds like you said Cyrillic has a lot to do with sound, so you should know that the I makes a long E sound and the "an" really sounds like "on". It would sound like E-von-yo (long o).
                  > > >>
                  > > >> And just in case.....I'm also extracting the name PENAK. Normally I wouldn't bother to mention this, as they lived in a completely different village. The Ivanyos lived in Zavatka and attended church in Sarosreviscse, which is present-day Blatne Reviste. The Penaks lived in Vinne, which was then called Vinnabanka, and attended church in the same village. However, in extracting records from this particular section I found one Pinak, with an i. Could have been visiting family or who knows what, but I'd hate to miss them. So, Penak is pronounced Pen-jhak.
                  > > >>
                  > > >> At this point in time, I'm extracting all information for related entries EXCEPT the name of the priest and the godparents--neither of those will help me link relationships at this point in time and I can always come back as long as I know which image and entry to come back to. If that is too much to do, just a note with which images and entries have Ivanyo or Penak on them would be helpful; then I can eventually learn to struggle my way through the rest.
                  > > >>
                  > > >> I will owe you big time for this one!
                  > > >>
                  > > >> Thanks again!
                  > > >>
                  > > >> Peg (Ivanyo)
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >>
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • Ron
                  Peg, You can go to http://stevemorse.org/russian/cyrprintcurs.html?font=print and write out your family names in Cyrillic, in capitals, small letters and in
                  Message 8 of 15 , Aug 6, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Peg,

                    You can go to
                    http://stevemorse.org/russian/cyrprintcurs.html?font=print

                    and write out your family names in Cyrillic, in capitals, small letters and in written form of the letters. That way you will recognize the name in different forms.

                    This was the reason form my posting #30234, "Reading Cyrillic Names". Maybe I am the only one who thinks this tool by Morse is the best thing since buttered bread.

                    --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Peg's Gmail <pegivanyo@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > This is great. That way I'll be able to start learning to find the names myself. Thanks!
                    > Peg
                    >
                    >
                    > On Aug 5, 2011, at 9:19 PM, Elaine Summerhill wrote:
                    >
                    > > Ivanyo in Cyrillic would look like иванÑ`. In script, the "и" looks like a capital "U". Penak looks like "пенак". The "P" looks like the symbol for "pi". I know Russian, which is why I know the Cyrillic alphabet. Wiki has a Cyrillic alphabet online here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_alphabet, if you want to teach yourself the alphabet.
                    > >
                    > > I will take a look as time allows to help you out. I wasn't expecting to go through so many records for you, oops. I do not know any Hungarian.
                    > >
                    > > Elaine
                    > >
                    > > >________________________________
                    > > >
                    > > >>
                    > > >> I did glance around through several other sets of records last night and found that I will definitely need to start learning how to do this sooner than I originally believed when I start on some extended records. For now, it would appear that just a few pages here and there in these earlier (how do you call 1832-1860 earlier?!) records are in Cyrillic. The rest are either in Hungarian or Latin.
                    > > >>
                    > > >> Beginning with image 29 of 94, for the Blatne Reviste, Sobrance, Greek Catholic records 1832-1860, and ending with image 48, the records are written in Cyrillic.
                    > > >> Here is the link to image 29:
                    > > >> https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11022-57613-89%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10598381
                    > > >>
                    > > >> Note there are two pages per image as is typical with these records. We are in the baptismal records. I am extracting any record that has a parent with the surname of IVANYO or Ivanyov or Ivanyouv. It sounds like you said Cyrillic has a lot to do with sound, so you should know that the I makes a long E sound and the "an" really sounds like "on". It would sound like E-von-yo (long o).
                    > > >>
                    > > >> And just in case.....I'm also extracting the name PENAK. Normally I wouldn't bother to mention this, as they lived in a completely different village. The Ivanyos lived in Zavatka and attended church in Sarosreviscse, which is present-day Blatne Reviste. The Penaks lived in Vinne, which was then called Vinnabanka, and attended church in the same village. However, in extracting records from this particular section I found one Pinak, with an i. Could have been visiting family or who knows what, but I'd hate to miss them. So, Penak is pronounced Pen-jhak.
                    > > >>
                    > > >> At this point in time, I'm extracting all information for related entries EXCEPT the name of the priest and the godparents--neither of those will help me link relationships at this point in time and I can always come back as long as I know which image and entry to come back to. If that is too much to do, just a note with which images and entries have Ivanyo or Penak on them would be helpful; then I can eventually learn to struggle my way through the rest.
                    > > >>
                    > > >> I will owe you big time for this one!
                    > > >>
                    > > >> Thanks again!
                    > > >>
                    > > >> Peg (Ivanyo)
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • CurtB
                    Ron, Peg, Elaine, To read the Rusyn church registers you need to know the Ukrainian and Rusyn variants of Cyrillic, for instance, the variant form of letter
                    Message 9 of 15 , Aug 6, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Ron, Peg, Elaine,

                      To read the Rusyn church registers you need to know the Ukrainian and Rusyn variants of Cyrillic, for instance, the variant form of letter "i". This is called the grazhdanka script by Rusyns. Modern usage has changed it a bit, but you need it to read the old church registers. Modern Russian script doesn't get you the "I" in Ivanyo.

                      You will find the script that you need with the English letter equivalent at this good University of Alberta site. Print out this PDF file.

                      http://www.spiritsd.ca/ukrainian/hbe/ukr/Writing%20The%20Alphabet%202007.pdf

                      You may also want to see their little interactive language show.

                      http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/~ukrdev/ALPHA_DEV/ALPHABET.html


                      Curt B.

                      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Ron" <amiak27@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Peg,
                      >
                      > You can go to
                      > http://stevemorse.org/russian/cyrprintcurs.html?font=print
                      >
                      > and write out your family names in Cyrillic, in capitals, small letters and in written form of the letters. That way you will recognize the name in different forms.
                      >
                      > This was the reason form my posting #30234, "Reading Cyrillic Names". Maybe I am the only one who thinks this tool by Morse is the best thing since buttered bread.
                      >
                      > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Peg's Gmail <pegivanyo@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > This is great. That way I'll be able to start learning to find the names myself. Thanks!
                      > > Peg
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > On Aug 5, 2011, at 9:19 PM, Elaine Summerhill wrote:
                      > >
                      > > > Ivanyo in Cyrillic would look like иван�`. In script, the "и" looks like a capital "U". Penak looks like "пенак". The "P" looks like the symbol for "pi". I know Russian, which is why I know the Cyrillic alphabet. Wiki has a Cyrillic alphabet online here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_alphabet, if you want to teach yourself the alphabet.
                      > > >
                      > > > I will take a look as time allows to help you out. I wasn't expecting to go through so many records for you, oops. I do not know any Hungarian.
                      > > >
                      > > > Elaine
                      > > >
                      > > > >________________________________
                      > > > >
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >> I did glance around through several other sets of records last night and found that I will definitely need to start learning how to do this sooner than I originally believed when I start on some extended records. For now, it would appear that just a few pages here and there in these earlier (how do you call 1832-1860 earlier?!) records are in Cyrillic. The rest are either in Hungarian or Latin.
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >> Beginning with image 29 of 94, for the Blatne Reviste, Sobrance, Greek Catholic records 1832-1860, and ending with image 48, the records are written in Cyrillic.
                      > > > >> Here is the link to image 29:
                      > > > >> https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11022-57613-89%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10598381
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >> Note there are two pages per image as is typical with these records. We are in the baptismal records. I am extracting any record that has a parent with the surname of IVANYO or Ivanyov or Ivanyouv. It sounds like you said Cyrillic has a lot to do with sound, so you should know that the I makes a long E sound and the "an" really sounds like "on". It would sound like E-von-yo (long o).
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >> And just in case.....I'm also extracting the name PENAK. Normally I wouldn't bother to mention this, as they lived in a completely different village. The Ivanyos lived in Zavatka and attended church in Sarosreviscse, which is present-day Blatne Reviste. The Penaks lived in Vinne, which was then called Vinnabanka, and attended church in the same village. However, in extracting records from this particular section I found one Pinak, with an i. Could have been visiting family or who knows what, but I'd hate to miss them. So, Penak is pronounced Pen-jhak.
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >> At this point in time, I'm extracting all information for related entries EXCEPT the name of the priest and the godparents--neither of those will help me link relationships at this point in time and I can always come back as long as I know which image and entry to come back to. If that is too much to do, just a note with which images and entries have Ivanyo or Penak on them would be helpful; then I can eventually learn to struggle my way through the rest.
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >> I will owe you big time for this one!
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >> Thanks again!
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >> Peg (Ivanyo)
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >>
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      >
                    • Elaine Summerhill
                      Yeah...  I kinda figured that out earlier today.  Thanks. Elaine ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      Message 10 of 15 , Aug 6, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Yeah...  I kinda figured that out earlier today.  Thanks.

                        Elaine



                        >________________________________
                        >
                        >Ron, Peg, Elaine,
                        >
                        >To read the Rusyn church registers you need to know the Ukrainian and Rusyn variants of Cyrillic, for instance, the variant form of letter "i".  This is called the grazhdanka script by Rusyns.  Modern usage has changed it a bit, but you need it to read the old church registers.  Modern Russian script doesn't get you the "I" in Ivanyo.
                        >
                        >You will find the script that you need with the English letter equivalent at this good University of Alberta site.  Print out this PDF file.
                        >
                        >http://www.spiritsd.ca/ukrainian/hbe/ukr/Writing%20The%20Alphabet%202007.pdf
                        >
                        >You may also want to see their little interactive language show.
                        >
                        >http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/~ukrdev/ALPHA_DEV/ALPHABET.html
                        >
                        >
                        >Curt B.
                        >
                        >--- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Ron" <amiak27@...> wrote:
                        >>
                        >> Peg,
                        >>
                        >> You can go to
                        >> http://stevemorse.org/russian/cyrprintcurs.html?font=print
                        >>
                        >> and write out your family names in Cyrillic, in capitals, small letters and in written form of the letters. That way you will recognize the name in different forms.
                        >>
                        >> This was the reason form my posting #30234, "Reading Cyrillic Names".  Maybe I am the only one who thinks this tool by Morse is the best thing since buttered bread.
                        >>
                        >> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Peg's Gmail <pegivanyo@> wrote:
                        >> >
                        >> > This is great.  That way I'll be able to start learning to find the names myself.  Thanks!
                        >> > Peg
                        >> >
                        >> >
                        >> > On Aug 5, 2011, at 9:19 PM, Elaine Summerhill wrote:
                        >> >
                        >> > > Ivanyo in Cyrillic would look like иван�`.  In script, the "и" looks like a capital "U".  Penak looks like "пенак".  The "P" looks like the symbol for "pi".  I know Russian, which is why I know the Cyrillic alphabet.  Wiki has a Cyrillic alphabet online here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_alphabet, if you want to teach yourself the alphabet.
                        >> > >
                        >> > > I will take a look as time allows to help you out.  I wasn't expecting to go through so many records for you, oops. I do not know any Hungarian.
                        >> > >
                        >> > > Elaine
                        >> > >
                        >> > > >________________________________
                        >> > > >
                        >> > > >>
                        >> > > >> I did glance around through several other sets of records last night and found that I will definitely need to start learning how to do this sooner than I originally believed when I start on some extended records.  For now, it would appear that just a few pages here and there in these earlier (how do you call 1832-1860 earlier?!) records are in Cyrillic.  The rest are either in Hungarian or Latin.
                        >> > > >>
                        >> > > >> Beginning with image 29 of 94, for the Blatne Reviste, Sobrance, Greek Catholic records 1832-1860, and ending with image 48, the records are written in Cyrillic.
                        >> > > >> Here is the link to image 29:
                        >> > > >> https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11022-57613-89%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10598381
                        >> > > >>
                        >> > > >> Note there are two pages per image as is typical with these records.  We are in the baptismal records.  I am extracting any record that has a parent with the surname of IVANYO or Ivanyov or Ivanyouv.  It sounds like you said Cyrillic has a lot to do with sound, so you should know that the I makes a long E sound and the "an" really sounds like "on".  It would sound like E-von-yo (long o). 
                        >> > > >>
                        >> > > >> And just in case.....I'm also extracting the name PENAK.  Normally I wouldn't bother to mention this, as they lived in a completely different village.  The Ivanyos lived in Zavatka and attended church in Sarosreviscse, which is present-day Blatne Reviste.  The Penaks lived in Vinne, which was then called Vinnabanka, and attended church in the same village.  However, in extracting records from this particular section I found one Pinak, with an i.  Could have been visiting family or who knows what, but I'd hate to miss them.  So, Penak is pronounced Pen-jhak.
                        >> > > >>
                        >> > > >> At this point in time, I'm extracting all information for related entries EXCEPT the name of the priest and the godparents--neither of those will help me link relationships at this point in time and I can always come back as long as I know which image and entry to come back to.  If that is too much to do, just a note with which images and entries have Ivanyo or Penak on them would be helpful; then I can eventually learn to struggle my way through the rest.
                        >> > > >>
                        >> > > >> I will owe you big time for this one! 
                        >> > > >>
                        >> > > >> Thanks again!
                        >> > > >>
                        >> > > >> Peg (Ivanyo)
                        >> > > >>
                        >> > > >>
                        >> > > >>
                        >> > > >
                        >> > > >
                        >> > >
                        >> > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >> > >
                        >> > >
                        >> >
                        >> >
                        >> >
                        >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >> >
                        >>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >------------------------------------
                        >
                        >PLEASE STAY ON-TOPIC (GENEALOGY).  OFF-TOPIC ITEMS WILL BE BLOCKED.
                        >
                        >To visit your group on the web, go to:
                        >    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
                        >
                        >To unsubscribe from this group, go to http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS%c2%a0 -or- send  blank email to SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Ron
                        Thanks Curt, I am aware of two I s, what we (Roman alphabet people) see as I and the backward N. I don t know which is used when, nor by whom, not do I much
                        Message 11 of 15 , Aug 6, 2011
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Thanks Curt,

                          I am aware of two I's, what we (Roman alphabet people) see as I and the backward N. I don't know which is used when, nor by whom, not do I much need to know for my limited purposes. It is nice when working with it to distinguish between the Russian, Ukrainain and the Rusyn, as you point out.

                          For me the great advantage of the web page I posted is that for me the printed Cyrillic is totally different to my eye than the written Cyrillic, and it means much more to me seeing the entire name in one piece. I tried taking individual letters and combining them, but was unhappy with the results.

                          Next time I do work with Cyrillic I will take more care to differentiate Rusyn from the other languages.

                          Ron


                          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Ron, Peg, Elaine,
                          >
                          > To read the Rusyn church registers you need to know the Ukrainian and Rusyn variants of Cyrillic, for instance, the variant form of letter "i". This is called the grazhdanka script by Rusyns. Modern usage has changed it a bit, but you need it to read the old church registers. Modern Russian script doesn't get you the "I" in Ivanyo.
                          >
                          > You will find the script that you need with the English letter equivalent at this good University of Alberta site. Print out this PDF file.
                          >
                          > http://www.spiritsd.ca/ukrainian/hbe/ukr/Writing%20The%20Alphabet%202007.pdf
                          >
                          > You may also want to see their little interactive language show.
                          >
                          > http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/~ukrdev/ALPHA_DEV/ALPHABET.html
                          >
                          >
                          > Curt B.
                          >
                          > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Ron" <amiak27@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Peg,
                          > >
                          > > You can go to
                          > > http://stevemorse.org/russian/cyrprintcurs.html?font=print
                          > >
                          > > and write out your family names in Cyrillic, in capitals, small letters and in written form of the letters. That way you will recognize the name in different forms.
                          > >
                          > > This was the reason form my posting #30234, "Reading Cyrillic Names". Maybe I am the only one who thinks this tool by Morse is the best thing since buttered bread.
                          > >
                          > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Peg's Gmail <pegivanyo@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > This is great. That way I'll be able to start learning to find the names myself. Thanks!
                          > > > Peg
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > On Aug 5, 2011, at 9:19 PM, Elaine Summerhill wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > > Ivanyo in Cyrillic would look like иван�`. In script, the "и" looks like a capital "U". Penak looks like "пенак". The "P" looks like the symbol for "pi". I know Russian, which is why I know the Cyrillic alphabet. Wiki has a Cyrillic alphabet online here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_alphabet, if you want to teach yourself the alphabet.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > I will take a look as time allows to help you out. I wasn't expecting to go through so many records for you, oops. I do not know any Hungarian.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > Elaine
                          > > > >
                          > > > > >________________________________
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >>
                          > > > > >> I did glance around through several other sets of records last night and found that I will definitely need to start learning how to do this sooner than I originally believed when I start on some extended records. For now, it would appear that just a few pages here and there in these earlier (how do you call 1832-1860 earlier?!) records are in Cyrillic. The rest are either in Hungarian or Latin.
                          > > > > >>
                          > > > > >> Beginning with image 29 of 94, for the Blatne Reviste, Sobrance, Greek Catholic records 1832-1860, and ending with image 48, the records are written in Cyrillic.
                          > > > > >> Here is the link to image 29:
                          > > > > >> https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11022-57613-89%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10598381
                          > > > > >>
                          > > > > >> Note there are two pages per image as is typical with these records. We are in the baptismal records. I am extracting any record that has a parent with the surname of IVANYO or Ivanyov or Ivanyouv. It sounds like you said Cyrillic has a lot to do with sound, so you should know that the I makes a long E sound and the "an" really sounds like "on". It would sound like E-von-yo (long o).
                          > > > > >>
                          > > > > >> And just in case.....I'm also extracting the name PENAK. Normally I wouldn't bother to mention this, as they lived in a completely different village. The Ivanyos lived in Zavatka and attended church in Sarosreviscse, which is present-day Blatne Reviste. The Penaks lived in Vinne, which was then called Vinnabanka, and attended church in the same village. However, in extracting records from this particular section I found one Pinak, with an i. Could have been visiting family or who knows what, but I'd hate to miss them. So, Penak is pronounced Pen-jhak.
                          > > > > >>
                          > > > > >> At this point in time, I'm extracting all information for related entries EXCEPT the name of the priest and the godparents--neither of those will help me link relationships at this point in time and I can always come back as long as I know which image and entry to come back to. If that is too much to do, just a note with which images and entries have Ivanyo or Penak on them would be helpful; then I can eventually learn to struggle my way through the rest.
                          > > > > >>
                          > > > > >> I will owe you big time for this one!
                          > > > > >>
                          > > > > >> Thanks again!
                          > > > > >>
                          > > > > >> Peg (Ivanyo)
                          > > > > >>
                          > > > > >>
                          > > > > >>
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • Peg's Gmail
                          Ron, Curt, Elaine, Gina: OK, my head is swimming. I ve only been working on my husband s Slovakian lines off and on for a little over a year now, so I thought
                          Message 12 of 15 , Aug 6, 2011
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Ron, Curt, Elaine, Gina:

                            OK, my head is swimming. I've only been working on my husband's Slovakian lines off and on for a little over a year now, so I thought I was doing great being able to just get them across the pond into specific villages and read a little bit of Hungarian and Latin! Boy am I glad I joined this group--so much knowledge out there!

                            I sincerely appreciate all of your comments and help. It might take me a while to absorb what you have contributed to the point that I can eventually come back with any kind of intelligent questions. Two huge curve-balls were served up--first the Cyrillic script issue, which I didn't think I would need to do battle with until I got into much older records. And then the Rusyn possibility. A lot to tackle all of a sudden. So, if you don't hear from me for a while now, that would be the "why", it definitely won't be from a lack of interest.

                            Oh yes, then I might disappear a little again when fall university classes begin as I will be taking a British Research class and Latin for Genealogists at the local university. I will need to focus what extra time I have on homework related to those courses and will only be able to come back to this intermittently. You see, all of my ancestors came from England, and my mother, who is 98, has passed her brick walls onto me :)

                            I have much to learn over the next few years between the two geographical areas. I should have a great deal of fun.

                            Again, thanks, thanks, and thanks!

                            Peg


                            On Aug 6, 2011, at 2:52 PM, Ron wrote:

                            > Thanks Curt,
                            >
                            > I am aware of two I's, what we (Roman alphabet people) see as I and the backward N. I don't know which is used when, nor by whom, not do I much need to know for my limited purposes. It is nice when working with it to distinguish between the Russian, Ukrainain and the Rusyn, as you point out.
                            >
                            > For me the great advantage of the web page I posted is that for me the printed Cyrillic is totally different to my eye than the written Cyrillic, and it means much more to me seeing the entire name in one piece. I tried taking individual letters and combining them, but was unhappy with the results.
                            >
                            > Next time I do work with Cyrillic I will take more care to differentiate Rusyn from the other languages.
                            >
                            > Ron
                            >
                            > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Ron, Peg, Elaine,
                            > >
                            > > To read the Rusyn church registers you need to know the Ukrainian and Rusyn variants of Cyrillic, for instance, the variant form of letter "i". This is called the grazhdanka script by Rusyns. Modern usage has changed it a bit, but you need it to read the old church registers. Modern Russian script doesn't get you the "I" in Ivanyo.
                            > >
                            > > You will find the script that you need with the English letter equivalent at this good University of Alberta site. Print out this PDF file.
                            > >
                            > > http://www.spiritsd.ca/ukrainian/hbe/ukr/Writing%20The%20Alphabet%202007.pdf
                            > >
                            > > You may also want to see their little interactive language show.
                            > >
                            > > http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/~ukrdev/ALPHA_DEV/ALPHABET.html
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > Curt B.
                            > >
                            > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Ron" <amiak27@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > Peg,
                            > > >
                            > > > You can go to
                            > > > http://stevemorse.org/russian/cyrprintcurs.html?font=print
                            > > >
                            > > > and write out your family names in Cyrillic, in capitals, small letters and in written form of the letters. That way you will recognize the name in different forms.
                            > > >
                            > > > This was the reason form my posting #30234, "Reading Cyrillic Names". Maybe I am the only one who thinks this tool by Morse is the best thing since buttered bread.
                            > > >
                            > > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Peg's Gmail <pegivanyo@> wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > This is great. That way I'll be able to start learning to find the names myself. Thanks!
                            > > > > Peg
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > On Aug 5, 2011, at 9:19 PM, Elaine Summerhill wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > > Ivanyo in Cyrillic would look like �����������`. In script, the "��" looks like a capital "U". Penak looks like "����������". The "P" looks like the symbol for "pi". I know Russian, which is why I know the Cyrillic alphabet. Wiki has a Cyrillic alphabet online here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_alphabet, if you want to teach yourself the alphabet.
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > I will take a look as time allows to help you out. I wasn't expecting to go through so many records for you, oops. I do not know any Hungarian.
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > Elaine
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > >________________________________
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >>
                            > > > > > >> I did glance around through several other sets of records last night and found that I will definitely need to start learning how to do this sooner than I originally believed when I start on some extended records. For now, it would appear that just a few pages here and there in these earlier (how do you call 1832-1860 earlier?!) records are in Cyrillic. The rest are either in Hungarian or Latin.
                            > > > > > >>
                            > > > > > >> Beginning with image 29 of 94, for the Blatne Reviste, Sobrance, Greek Catholic records 1832-1860, and ending with image 48, the records are written in Cyrillic.
                            > > > > > >> Here is the link to image 29:
                            > > > > > >> https://www.familysearch.org/search/image/show#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/pal%3A/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11022-57613-89%3Fcc%3D1554443%26wc%3D10598381
                            > > > > > >>
                            > > > > > >> Note there are two pages per image as is typical with these records. We are in the baptismal records. I am extracting any record that has a parent with the surname of IVANYO or Ivanyov or Ivanyouv. It sounds like you said Cyrillic has a lot to do with sound, so you should know that the I makes a long E sound and the "an" really sounds like "on". It would sound like E-von-yo (long o).
                            > > > > > >>
                            > > > > > >> And just in case.....I'm also extracting the name PENAK. Normally I wouldn't bother to mention this, as they lived in a completely different village. The Ivanyos lived in Zavatka and attended church in Sarosreviscse, which is present-day Blatne Reviste. The Penaks lived in Vinne, which was then called Vinnabanka, and attended church in the same village. However, in extracting records from this particular section I found one Pinak, with an i. Could have been visiting family or who knows what, but I'd hate to miss them. So, Penak is pronounced Pen-jhak.
                            > > > > > >>
                            > > > > > >> At this point in time, I'm extracting all information for related entries EXCEPT the name of the priest and the godparents--neither of those will help me link relationships at this point in time and I can always come back as long as I know which image and entry to come back to. If that is too much to do, just a note with which images and entries have Ivanyo or Penak on them would be helpful; then I can eventually learn to struggle my way through the rest.
                            > > > > > >>
                            > > > > > >> I will owe you big time for this one!
                            > > > > > >>
                            > > > > > >> Thanks again!
                            > > > > > >>
                            > > > > > >> Peg (Ivanyo)
                            > > > > > >>
                            > > > > > >>
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