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changing last names

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  • Peg's Gmail
    Since this group seems to be answering all my odd questions today, I m going for a third one. Is it typical for names to change in the parish records over
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 4 1:01 PM
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      Since this group seems to be answering all my odd questions today, I'm going for a third one.

      Is it typical for names to change in the parish records over time?

      For example, the last couple of days I've been extracting records from 1832-1860, baptisms. I am finding Ivanyo, and Ivanyov. But now, on image 24 of 94 I'm seeing a Janos Ivany??ov--several extra letters. Early in this same record he is listed as just Janos Ivanyo.

      Earlier this year in a similar set of records I found an Anna Ádámcsik which was later shortened to just Ádám.

      Common practice? Does it have a meaning of some kind?

      Peg
    • CurtB
      Not sure whether this is typical , but it is not unusual. As different alphabets of Latin, Hungarian, and Slovak are used, the spellings change, and first
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 4 1:44 PM
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        Not sure whether this is "typical", but it is not unusual. As different alphabets of Latin, Hungarian, and Slovak are used, the spellings change, and first names such as Janos [hungarian] and Jan [slovak] are really the same. Shortening of names is also common

        Adamcsik, Adamcik, Adam, is not unusual.

        This happens not just in Slovak records but other European countries and in the U.S. records we well. Spelling and orthography were regularized in the U.S. only in the 20th century and recording of surnames still undergoes changes in the U.S.

        Curt B.



        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Peg's Gmail <pegivanyo@...> wrote:
        >
        > Since this group seems to be answering all my odd questions today, I'm going for a third one.
        >
        > Is it typical for names to change in the parish records over time?
        >
        > For example, the last couple of days I've been extracting records from 1832-1860, baptisms. I am finding Ivanyo, and Ivanyov. But now, on image 24 of 94 I'm seeing a Janos Ivany??ov--several extra letters. Early in this same record he is listed as just Janos Ivanyo.
        >
        > Earlier this year in a similar set of records I found an Anna �d�mcsik which was later shortened to just �d�m.
        >
        > Common practice? Does it have a meaning of some kind?
        >
        > Peg
        >
      • Peg's Gmail
        Thanks Curt. You have been very helpful! Peg ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 4 1:51 PM
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          Thanks Curt. You have been very helpful!

          Peg


          On Aug 4, 2011, at 2:44 PM, CurtB wrote:

          > Not sure whether this is "typical", but it is not unusual. As different alphabets of Latin, Hungarian, and Slovak are used, the spellings change, and first names such as Janos [hungarian] and Jan [slovak] are really the same. Shortening of names is also common
          >
          > Adamcsik, Adamcik, Adam, is not unusual.
          >
          > This happens not just in Slovak records but other European countries and in the U.S. records we well. Spelling and orthography were regularized in the U.S. only in the 20th century and recording of surnames still undergoes changes in the U.S.
          >
          > Curt B.
          >
          > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Peg's Gmail <pegivanyo@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Since this group seems to be answering all my odd questions today, I'm going for a third one.
          > >
          > > Is it typical for names to change in the parish records over time?
          > >
          > > For example, the last couple of days I've been extracting records from 1832-1860, baptisms. I am finding Ivanyo, and Ivanyov. But now, on image 24 of 94 I'm seeing a Janos Ivany??ov--several extra letters. Early in this same record he is listed as just Janos Ivanyo.
          > >
          > > Earlier this year in a similar set of records I found an Anna ���d���mcsik which was later shortened to just ���d���m.
          > >
          > > Common practice? Does it have a meaning of some kind?
          > >
          > > Peg
          > >
          >
          >



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